SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6 OPERATION OF AIRCRAFT PART II INTERNATIONAL GENERAL AVIATION AEROPLANES. (Sixth Edition)

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6 OPERATION OF AIRCRAFT PART II INTERNATIONAL GENERAL AVIATION AEROPLANES. (Sixth Edition)"

Transcription

1 Transmittal Note SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6 OPERATION OF AIRCRAFT PART II INTERNATIONAL GENERAL AVIATION AEROPLANES (Sixth Edition) 1. The attached Supplement supersedes all previous Supplements to Annex 6, Part II, and includes differences notified by Contracting States up to 15 July 2004 with respect to all amendments up to and including Amendment This Supplement should be inserted at the end of Annex 6, Part II (Sixth Edition). Additional differences received from Contracting States will be issued at intervals as amendments to this Supplement.

2 SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6 OPERATION OF AIRCRAFT Part II International General Aviation Aeroplanes (Sixth Edition) Differences between the national regulations and practices of Contracting States and the corresponding International Standards and Recommended Practices contained in Annex 6, Part II, as notified to ICAO in accordance with Article 38 of the Convention on International Civil Aviation and the Council s resolution of 21 November JULY 2004 I N T E R N A T I O N A L C I V I L A V I A T I O N O R G A N I Z A T I O N

3 (ii) SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) RECORD OF AMENDMENTS TO SUPPLEMENT No. Date Entered by No. Date Entered by AMENDMENTS TO ANNEX 6, PART II, ADOPTED OR APPROVED BY THE COUNCIL SUBSEQUENT TO THE SIXTH EDITION ISSUED JULY 1998 No. Date of adoption or approval Date applicable No. Date of adoption or approval Date applicable 19 15/3/99 4/11/ /3/00 2/11/ /3/01 1/11/ /3/02 28/11/02

4 SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) (iii) 1. Contracting States which have notified ICAO of differences The Contracting States listed below have notified ICAO of differences which exist between their national regulations and practices and the International Standards and Recommended Practices of Annex 6, Part II (Sixth Edition), up to and including Amendment 22, or have commented on implementation. The page numbers shown for each State and the dates of publication of those pages correspond to the actual pages in this Supplement. State Date of notification Pages in Supplement Date of publication Argentina 17/4/02 2 Belarus 6/11/02 1 Belgium 22/5/02 1 Brazil 6/1/03 2 Chile 24/6/02 1 China 23/10/02 1 Cook Islands 13/10/02 3 Croatia 28/5/02 1 Czech Republic 13/3/03 1 France 21/10/02 2 Germany 15/10/ /5/ /5/02 2 Malaysia 21/5/02 1 Myanmar 22/1/03 1 Norway 6/11/02 1 Panama 7/1/03 2 Republic of Korea 30/10/ /5/03 4 Singapore 21/11/01 1 Sweden 12/3/03 2 Uganda 14/6/02 1 United Kingdom 8/11/02 3 6/11/ Contracting States which have notified ICAO that no differences exist State Date of notification State Date of notification Bahamas 22/11/02 Ireland 5/10/03 Bahrain 2/6/02 Jordan 9/10/02 Barbados 18/4/02 Kuwait 17/8/02 Burundi 18/6/02 Paraguay 20/6/02 China (Hong Kong SAR) 23/10/02 Portugal 28/10/02 Estonia 29/10/02 Romania 28/10/02 Ghana 3/6/02 Slovakia 26/8/02 Greece 28/10/02 United Arab Emirates 21/9/02 Iraq 22/6/02

5 (iv) SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) 3. Contracting States from which no information has been received Afghanistan Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Antigua and Barbuda Armenia Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bangladesh Belize Benin Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Central African Republic Chad Colombia Comoros Congo Costa Rica Côte d Ivoire Cuba Cyprus Democratic People s Republic of Korea Democratic Republic of the Congo Denmark Djibouti Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Ethiopia Fiji Finland Gabon Gambia Georgia Grenada Guatemala Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran (Islamic Republic of) Israel Jamaica Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Kyrgyzstan Lao People s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Lithuania Luxembourg Madagascar Malawi Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Mauritania Mauritius Mexico Micronesia (Federated States of) Monaco Mongolia Morocco Mozambique Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Oman Pakistan Palau Papua New Guinea Peru Philippines Poland Qatar Republic of Moldova Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Vincent and the Grenadines San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia and Montenegro Seychelles Sierra Leone Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Swaziland Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Tajikistan Thailand The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia Togo Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Ukraine United Republic of Tanzania Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela Viet Nam Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe

6 SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) (v) 4. Paragraphs with respect to which differences have been notified Paragraph Differences notified by Paragraph Differences notified by General Chapter 1 Definitions Belgium Croatia Myanmar Argentina Cook Islands Sweden United Kingdom Chapter 3 General 3.2 Cook Islands 3.3 Panama 3.5 Cook Islands Germany Chapter 4 General Germany Argentina Sweden Brazil France 4.5 Panama France United Kingdom Cook Islands France United Kingdom Cook Islands Cook Islands Panama Argentina Argentina 4.9 United Kingdom 4.10 Sweden United Kingdom Cook Islands 4.13 Cook Islands 4.14 Sweden Germany 4.17 Sweden Cook Islands Germany Cook Islands Germany Chapter 5 General Chapter 6 General Argentina Singapore United Kingdom Brazil Cook Islands France Germany Panama Sweden United Kingdom

7 (vi) SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) Paragraph Differences notified by Paragraph Differences notified by Brazil Cook Islands France Germany Cook Islands France Brazil Sweden Cook Islands United Kingdom Cook Islands Germany United Kingdom Czech Republic Sweden France 6.3 Uganda Brazil Cook Islands United Kingdom United Kingdom 6.4 Brazil Cook Islands Panama Uganda United Kingdom 6.5 Germany Brazil Sweden Argentina 6.7 Cook Islands Czech Republic France United Kingdom 6.8 Cook Islands Panama 6.9 Malaysia Sweden Belarus Cook Islands France Chile Cook Islands France Germany Norway Brazil China Cook Islands France Germany Republic of Korea Argentina Brazil China

8 SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) (vii) Paragraph Differences notified by Paragraph Differences notified by Cook Islands France Germany Republic of Korea Cook Islands Germany Belarus United Kingdom Brazil France 6.10 Panama Germany Brazil Cook Islands Brazil Cook Islands Germany Cook Islands Germany Sweden Cook Islands Germany Sweden United Kingdom Brazil Cook Islands France Germany Sweden United Kingdom Brazil Cook Islands France Germany Sweden United Kingdom Brazil Cook Islands France Sweden United Kingdom Brazil Cook Islands Germany Brazil France Sweden United Kingdom Sweden Sweden Sweden Sweden Sweden Brazil Cook Islands Germany Brazil Cook Islands Germany United Kingdom Argentina Brazil

9 (viii) SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) Paragraph Differences notified by Paragraph Differences notified by Cook Islands France Germany Brazil Cook Islands France United Kingdom Germany Germany Cook Islands Germany United Kingdom Cook Islands Germany Germany Brazil Cook Islands Brazil Cook Islands France Brazil Cook Islands Sweden United Kingdom Cook Islands Germany Germany Germany Sweden Cook Islands France Cook Islands Cook Islands Germany Brazil 6.11 Brazil France Germany Sweden Argentina Germany United Kingdom Argentina Germany United Kingdom Germany United Kingdom Argentina Argentina 6.13 Argentina Panama United Kingdom United Kingdom 6.14 Argentina Brazil Cook Islands France Germany Chapter 7 General Panama United Kingdom

10 SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) (ix) Paragraph Differences notified by Paragraph Differences notified by United Kingdom Chapter 8 General Panama 8.1 Cook Islands United Kingdom France United Kingdom Cook Islands Sweden Cook Islands Sweden 8.3 United Kingdom Chapter 9 General 9.1 Cook Islands 9.2 Panama

11 SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) ARGENTINA 1 Chapter 1 Definitions Aerial Work. The national regulations stipulate that aerial work is the commercial operation of aircraft in any manner except for air transport service. Chapter e) Passenger emergency briefing cards are not required. 4.8 The national regulations replace the word oil by lubricant a) The national regulations require the fuel and lubricant necessary to fly to the planned destination and to prolong the flight by an additional 30 per cent of the time calculated for that stage, but this supply must not be less than 45 minutes. Chapter 6 Use of an airborne collision avoidance system (ACAS). From 1 January 2005, aeroplanes and helicopters registered in Argentina and abroad, which have a maximum certificated take-off mass in excess of kg or an approved maximum configuration of more than 30 seats, excluding any pilots seats, and which engage in general aviation flights in which the Argentine Republic provides air traffic services, must be equipped with an airborne collision avoidance system of the ACAS II type or equipment having similar parameters. From January 2005, all aeroplanes and helicopters registered in Argentina and abroad which engage in flights above a height of ft in the airspace in which the Argentine Republic provides air traffic services and which have: a) a maximum certificated take-off mass in excess of kg; or b) an approved maximum configuration of 10 seats or more, excluding any pilots seats, must be equipped with ACAS II equipment or equipment having similar parameters. From 1 January 2003, the airborne collision avoidance system (ACAS II or equipment having similar parameters) shall operate in accordance with the relevant provisions of Annex 10, Volume IV. 6.6 c) The national regulations require two sensitive pressure altimeters * Ground proximity warning system not required for piston-engined aircraft * All turbine-powered multi-engined aeroplanes of a maximum certificated take-off mass in excess of kg or configured for 10 or more passengers, excluding any pilots seats, must be equipped with one or more approved flight recorders. Parameter read-outs required: From 1 July 2000, Argentina requires one automatically activated emergency locator transmitter (ELT) which operates on 406 and MHz From 1 July 2002, Argentina requires one automatically activated ELT which operates on 406 and MHz.

12 2 ARGENTINA SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) * The obligation established in this section does not apply to: a) commercial air transport aircraft in training operations, within a 50 NM radius of the airport from which the operation began; b) aircraft engaged in design and flight test operations; and c) aircraft during any period in which the automatic ELT has been temporarily removed for inspection, repair, modification or replacement, subject to the following: 1) the aircraft s records must contain a note including the date of initial removal, the brand, model, serial number and reasons for the removal of the automatic ELT, and a plate located within view of the pilot bearing the legend ELT NOT INSTALLED. The absences of the ELT must be indicated in all flight plans; and 2) operations covered by this exception will cease 90 days after the date on which the automatic ELT was removed from the aircraft All aircraft are exempted from the installation of the ELT remote control until 1 January From 1 July 2000, aircraft registered in Argentina and abroad which engage in general aviation flights in the airspace in which the Argentine Republic provides air traffic services, except those authorized for aerial air application work and those assigned to flying schools while they are used in flight training and gliders, must be equipped with an airborne pressure-altitude reporting transponder (secondary surveillance radar (SSR) Mode C). 6.14* Not implemented.

13 SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) BELARUS 1 Chapter As of 1 January 2001, all turbine-engined aeroplanes of a maximum certificated take-off mass in excess of kg or authorized to carry more than nine passengers shall be equipped with a ground proximity warning system if conducting international flights The ground proximity warning system shall provide, as a minimum, warnings of the following circumstances: a) excessive terrain closure rate; b) excessive altitude loss after take-off or go-around; and c) unsafe terrain clearance while gear not locked down.

14 SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) BELGIUM 1 General Belgium has not promulgated regulations for international general aviation corresponding to the requirements of Annex 6, Part II International General Aviation Aeroplanes, except for rules of the air and maintenance requirements for these types of aircraft.

15 SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) BRAZIL 1 Chapter * Not implemented. Chapter a) Remark: This subject is being analysed. Implementation will possibly occur after 31 December 2003 for aeroplanes with more than kg maximum take-off mass e) Brazilian regulations apply this requirement only to IFR and night VFR flights * Not implemented The Brazilian regulations do not require break-in points. Remark: Brazilian regulations require only external marking of the emergency exits The Brazilian regulations do not presently require anchors. 6.4 Not implemented. Remark: Anchors will be required after 31 March Remark: There is intention to do so in the near future, as practicable The operational rules in Brazil do not require such a device because it is mandatory through the 6.5.3* type certification rules * Brazilian regulations require all aeroplanes manufactured after 31 December 2003 and authorized to carry more than six passengers to be equipped with a ground proximity warning system with a forward looking terrain avoidance function, and aeroplanes manufactured before 1 January 2004 to be equipped with a ground proximity warning system with a forward looking avoidance function before 1 January * Not implemented * Brazilian regulations require all aeroplanes manufactured after 31 December 2003 and authorized to carry more than six passengers to be equipped with a ground proximity warning system with a forward looking terrain avoidance function, and aeroplanes manufactured before 1 January 2004 to be equipped with a ground proximity warning system with a forward looking avoidance function before 1 January The Brazilian regulations use the FAA requirements and consider them similar to the ICAO requirements Not implemented

16 2 BRAZIL SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) Remark: This subject is being analysed. Implementation will occur after 31 December * Not implemented. Remark: There is intention to do so in the near future, as practicable In the Brazilian regulations, the Type IA flight data recorder (FDR) or similar is not required for general aviation Brazilian regulations require capacity to record at least the last eight hours of operation The Brazilian regulations do not require a Type I FDR or similar for general aviation * The Brazilian regulations require a Type II FDR or similar which must record at least the last eight minutes Not implemented. Remark: This subject is being analysed. Implementation will not occur before 31 December Brazilian regulations require the capacity to record the last 15 minutes of operation * Not implemented Not implemented Not implemented. Remark: There is intention to do so in the near future, as practicable. This rule is not mandatory. Remark: This subject is being analysed. Implementation will not occur before 31 December Remark: There is intention to do so in the near future, as practicable Brazilian regulations do not have a Mach number indicator. 6.14* Not implemented. Remark: There is intention to do so in the near future. Remark: There is intention to do so in the near future. This rule is not mandatory.

17 SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) CHILE 1 Chapter Only applicable to turbojets with a passenger seating capacity of more than ten.

18 SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) CHINA 1 Chapter * Not implemented * Remark: Date of compliance to be determined.

19 SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) COOK ISLANDS 1 Chapter 1 Definitions Flight crew member. A crew member assigned by an operator for duty in an aircraft during flight time as a pilot or flight engineer. Flight time aeroplanes. The total time from the moment the aircraft first moves under its own power for the purpose of taking off until the moment it comes to rest at the end of the flight. General aviation operation. In the Cook Islands, the generic term general aviation may include commercial operations. In such cases, the more stringent provision of Annex 6, Part I, as appropriate, is applied. Pilot-in-command. In relation to any aircraft, means the pilot responsible for the operation and safety of the aircraft. Chapter The pilot-in-command of an aircraft shall: 3.5* Not implemented. a) be responsible for the safe operation of the aircraft in flight, the safety and well-being of all passengers and crew, and the safety of cargo carried; b) have final authority to control the aircraft while in command and for the maintenance of discipline by all persons on board; and c) subject to Section 23, Subsections 3) and 7) of the Civil Aviation Act (Duties of pilot-incommand and operator during emergencies), be responsible for compliance with all relevant requirements of this Act and regulations and rules made under this Act. Chapter Not implemented Operation below DA, DH or MDA. Where a DA, DH or MDA is applicable, no pilot-in-command shall operate an aircraft at any aerodrome below the MDA, or continue an instrument approach procedure below the DA or DH prescribed in paragraph b), unless: a) the aircraft is continuously in a position from which a descent to a landing on the intended runway can be made at a normal rate of descent using normal manoeuvres that will allow touchdown to occur within the touchdown zone of the runway of intended landing; and b) the flight visibility is not less than the visibility prescribed under Part 19 for the instrument approach procedure being used. c) Landing. A pilot-in-command shall not land an aircraft when the flight visibility is less than the visibility prescribed under Part 19 for the instrument approach procedure used.

20 2 COOK ISLANDS SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) 4.12* Not implemented. 4.13* * * d) Missed approach procedures. Each pilot-in-command shall immediately execute the missed approach procedure prescribed under Part 19 if: 1) the requirements of paragraph c) are not met at either of the following times: i) when the aircraft is being operated below MDA; or ii) upon arrival at the missed approach point, including a DA or DH where a DA or DH is specified and its use is required, and any time after that until touchdown; or 2) an identifiable part of the aerodrome is not distinctly visible to the pilot during a circling manoeuvre at or above MDA, unless the inability to see an identifiable part of the aerodrome results only from normal manoeuvring of the aircraft during approach. Chapter d) Not implemented. 3) 4) and e) * * For aircraft with 10 passenger seats or more and for aircraft when low flying Not implemented There are no requirements for equipment for making sound signals and an anchor. Each aircraft in excess of kg shall be equipped with one sea anchor. 6.4 There is no requirement for means of sustaining life. 6.7 There are no requirements for a landing light and lights in all passenger compartments. 6.8 Not implemented * 6.9.4* *

21 SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) COOK ISLANDS Not implemented * * * * * Chapter In the context of the Cook Islands Civil Aviation Rules, the owner is the operator. Ministry of Transport define operator in relation to an aircraft, as the person flying or using the aircraft, or causing or permitting the aircraft to be flown, be used, or be in any place, whether or not the person is present with the aircraft CAR , retention of records, provides for periods of five years or one year respectively In the context of the Cook Islands Civil Aviation Rules, the lessee, like the owner, is the operator. Chapter Not implemented.

22 SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) CROATIA 1 General The national regulations are not completed. The decisions on particular applications are taken by virtue of ICAO SARPs.

23 SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) CZECH REPUBLIC 1 Chapter b) Not applied for aeroplanes operating above the territory of the Czech Republic for which the Certificate of Airworthiness was issued for the first time before 31 December a) The following instruments are not required for VFR night flights: a) a means of indicating in the flight crew compartment the outside air temperature; or b) a turn and slip indicator, an attitude indicator (artificial horizon), a heading indicator (directional gyroscope) or their combinations or integrated flight director systems.

24 SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) FRANCE 1 Chapter * France has no particular requirements concerning the climb gradient information other than those contained in the flight manual France does not require the existence of an instrument approach procedure for isolated aerodromes with no alternate aerodrome France has no particular requirement concerning the continuation of the flight as being dependent upon the meteorological conditions at the destination or alternate aerodrome. Chapter France requires light aeroplanes (maximum certificated take-off mass below kg and a maximum passenger capacity of nine) to carry first-aid kits only on flights over water or designated land areas, and does not require carriage of an extinguisher. The carriage of fuses is required only for night flights * France requires carriage of the ground-air signal codes used for search and rescue only on flights over designated land areas * France does not require a safety harness for old aeroplanes (those manufactured before 1983) * France has no particular requirements for controlled VFR flights other than compliance with ATC requirements. 6.7 France does not require aeroplanes flying VFR at night to be equipped with a timepiece, a thermometer, pitot anti-icing or passenger cabin lighting * 6.9.4* French regulations for general aviation concern only aeroplanes of more than kg or more than 30 passengers French regulations do not yet include requirements for the recording of data link communications The list of parameters required under French regulations is not in complete compliance with the requirements of Annex * France requires a Type II data recorder for aeroplanes with a maximum take-off mass of kg or over, which conducted their first flight on or after 1 January It only requires the flight path to be recorded for aeroplanes with a maximum take-off mass of kg or over, which conducted their first flight before 1 January The list of parameters for Type IA recorders has not yet been included in French regulations. The scope of application with respect to Type IA recorders has consequently not yet been defined.

25 2 FRANCE SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) * France requires cockpit voice recorders for aeroplanes of over kg only if they were certificated on or after 1 April Not implemented France requires a Mach number indicator only for heavy aeroplanes (maximum certificated take-off mass of over kg or a passenger capacity of more than nine). 6.14* Not implemented. Chapter France permits the maintenance release to be signed by a person who is not licensed in accordance with Annex 1 for maintenance operations carried out outside an approved organization in the following cases: a) simple maintenance; and b) maintenance on light aircraft for which a restricted certificate that is not in accordance with Annex 8 has been issued. In these cases, the airworthiness certificate is valid for only six months and renewal is carried out directly by the French authorities.

26 SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) GERMANY 1 Chapter 3 3.5* Not implemented. Chapter Not implemented * * * Chapter Germany does not yet have regulations concerning the carriage of the relevant documents, but in practice the specific documents are already carried on board aircraft * Not implemented Not implemented. 6.5 This paragraph has not yet been introduced into the national regulations of Germany Not implemented * 6.9.4* Not implemented Use of metal foil recorders was not discontinued on 1 January * Not implemented * * * *

27 2 GERMANY SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) 6.11 Not implemented *

28 SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) ITALY 1 Chapter 3 Not implemented. Chapter 4 Not implemented except for paragraph 4.4. Chapter 5 Not implemented. Chapter * Not implemented * Not implemented. Controlled VFR flights are not permitted in Not implemented * * 6.9.4* * * * * Chapter There are no operational requirements. 9.2

29 SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) JAPAN 1 Chapter 3 3.5* Not implemented. Chapter d) Aeroplanes are not required to be equipped with manuals containing procedures and visual signals 3) and 4) for intercepted or intercepting aircraft * Not implemented has no requirement for marking of break-in points * Aeroplanes operated as controlled VFR flights are not required to carry all equipment necessary for IFR flights c) and d) Not implemented. has no requirement for aeroplanes to be equipped with an anchor or a sea anchor (drogue) b) Multi-engined aeroplanes are required to carry lifesaving rafts on overwater flights of more than 720 km. The distance will be amended to 370 km on 17 January a) Aeroplanes operated at night in accordance with VFR are not required to be equipped with all equipment necessary for IFR flights Not implemented. GPWS is required for aeroplanes used for air transportation services Not implemented. has no requirement for discontinuation of photographic film FDR Not implemented. has no requirement for recording digital communications to Not implemented. has no requirement for Type IA FDR Aeroplanes other than those used for air transportation services will be required to be equipped with FDRs on and after 11 July * Not implemented. Aeroplanes of a maximum take-off mass of kg or less and not engaged in air transportation services are not required to be equipped with FDRs Not implemented. has no requirement for Type IA FDR Aeroplanes other than those used for air transportation services will be required to be equipped with a CVR on and after 11 July 2002.

30 2 JAPAN SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) * Aeroplanes of a maximum take-off mass of kg or less and not engaged in air transportation services are not required to be equipped with a CVR * A CVR is required to be capable of retaining the information recorded during the last 30 minutes of its operation A CVR is required to be capable of retaining the information recorded during the last 30 minutes of its operation Multi-engined aeroplanes are required to carry an ELT on overwater flights of more than 720 km. The distance will be amended to 370 km on 17 January 2003, and aeroplanes will be required to be equipped with an ELT when operated over a designated land area on and after 17 January Not implemented. has no requirement for aeroplanes to be equipped with an automatic ELT * Aeroplanes are required to be equipped with a pressure altitude transponder when operated in airspace designated by the Minister of Land, Infrastructure and Transport. 6.14* Not implemented. has no requirement for the use of boom or throat microphones.

31 SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) MALAYSIA 1 Chapter Not implemented. Aircraft not fitted with GPWS with a forward looking terrain avoidance function are restricted to less than 10 persons for international operations.

32 SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) MYANMAR 1 General Myanmar has not promulgated regulations for international general aviation corresponding to the requirements of Annex 6, Part II, except for maintenance requirements.

33 SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) NORWAY 1 Chapter Norway will not require retrofitting for aeroplanes equipped with GPWS before 1 October 2001.

34 SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) PANAMA 1 Chapter Reports concerning violations of regulations in emergency situations must be submitted within five days. Chapter Completed flight preparation forms must be retained for one year Parameters have been established for Category II and Category III operations. Chapter It is obligatory to carry the flight clearance documents on board. 6.4 The entire airspace of Panama is designated land area, and it is obligatory for all aircraft to be equipped with an emergency locator transmitter. 6.8 Panama permits the operation of aircraft that do not meet Stage 2 or 3 noise level requirements if they have been registered prior to 1 January Aircraft registered after this date must meet Stage 3 noise level requirements These recommendations are obligatory, and the requirements established for turbine-powered aeroplanes have been extended to turbo-propeller aeroplanes It is obligatory for aircraft used for commercial passenger transport to be equipped with a device to provide warning in the case of loss of pressurization. Chapter 7 Panama requires the use of two-way communication equipment for all aircraft and all operations carried out in its airspace. Chapter 8 The following special airworthiness requirements are obligatory for aircraft operating in Panama s airspace: a) every 24 months the static pressure, system, altimeter and automatic pressure-altitude reporting system must be inspected; b) every 24 months the transponder must be inspected; and c) the passenger and crew compartments must contain materials that are at the very least fire-resistant, and each receptacle for towels, paper and trash must be made of fire-resistant material that includes a medium for containing possible fires. Chapter 9

35 2 PANAMA SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) 9.2 A flight crew of two pilots is obligatory for aircraft authorized to operate using IFR and to carry more than 10 passengers.

36 SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) REPUBLIC OF KOREA 1 Chapter * Not implemented * Not regulated. Remark: Korea has no turbine-engined general aviation aeroplanes of a maximum take-off mass of kg or less and authorized to carry more than five but not more than nine passengers. Remark: Korea has no piston-engined general aviation aeroplanes of a maximum certificated takeoff mass in excess of kg or authorized to carry more than nine passengers.

37 SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) SAMOA 1 Chapter 1 Definitions Flight crew member. A crew member assigned by an operator for duty in an aircraft during flight time as a pilot or flight engineer. Flight time aeroplanes. The total time from the moment the aircraft first moves under its own power for the purpose of taking off until the moment it comes to rest at the end of the flight. General aviation operation. In the Civil Aviation System, the generic term general aviation can include commercial operations. In such cases, the more stringent provision of Annex 6, Part I, as appropriate, is applied. Pilot-in-command. In relation to any aircraft, means the pilot responsible for the operation and safety of the aircraft. Chapter The pilot-in-command shall: 3.5* Not implemented. a) be responsible for the safe operation of the aircraft in flight, the safety and well-being of all passengers and crew, and the safety of cargo carried; b) have final authority to control the aircraft while in command and for the maintenance of discipline by all persons on board; and c) subject to Section 13A of the Civil Aviation Act ( Duties of pilot-in-command and operator during emergencies ), be responsible for compliance with all relevant requirements of this Act and regulations and rules made under this Act. Chapter Not implemented CAR c). Operation below DA, DH or MDA. Where a DA, DH or MDA is applicable, no pilot-in-command shall operate an aircraft at any aerodrome below the MDA, or continue an instrument approach procedure below the DA or DH prescribed in paragraph b) unless: a) the aircraft is continuously in a position from which a descent to a landing on the intended runway can be made at a normal rate of descent using normal manoeuvres that will allow touchdown to occur within the touchdown zone of the runway of intended landing; and b) the flight visibility is not less than the visibility prescribed under Part 97 for the instrument approach procedure being used; and c) except for a Category II or Category III precision approach procedure prescribed under Part 97 for that aerodrome that includes any necessary visual reference requirements, at least one of

38 2 SAMOA SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) the following visual references for the intended runway is distinctly visible and identifiable to the pilot: 1) the approach lighting system; or 2) the threshold markings; or 3) the threshold lights; or 4) the runway-end identification lights; or 5) the visual approach slope indicator; or 6) the touchdown zone or touchdown zone markings; or 7) the touchdown zone lights; or 8) the runway or runway markings; or 9) the runway lights. 4.12* Not implemented. 4.13* * * d) Landing. A pilot-in-command shall not land an aircraft when the flight visibility is less than the visibility prescribed under Part 97 for the instrument approach procedure used. e) Missed approach procedures. Each pilot-in-command shall immediately execute the missed approach procedure prescribed under Part 97 if: 1) the requirements of paragraph c) are not met at either of the following times: i) when the aircraft is being operated below MDA; or ii) upon arrival at the missed approach point, including a DA or DH where a DA or DH is specified and its use is required, and any time after that until touchdown; or 2) an identifiable part of the aerodrome is not distinctly visible to the pilot during a circling manoeuvre at or above MDA, unless the inability to see an identifiable part of the aerodrome results only from normal manoeuvring of the aircraft during approach. Chapter d) 3), Not implemented. 4) and e) *

39 SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) SAMOA * For aircraft with 10 passenger seats or more and for aircraft when low flying Not implemented Except for equipment for making sound signals and an anchor. Each aircraft in excess of kg shall be equipped with one sea anchor. 6.7 Except for a landing light and lights in all passenger compartments. 6.8 Not implemented * 6.9.4* * * * * * Chapter In the context of the Civil Aviation Rules (CARs), the owner is the operator. The CARs define operator in relation to an aircraft, as the person flying or using the aircraft, or causing or permitting the aircraft to be flown, be used, or be in any place whether or not the person is present with the aircraft CAR Retention of records provides for a period of two years or six months In the context of the Civil Aviation Rules, the lessee, like the owner, is the operator.

40 4 SAMOA SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) Chapter Not implemented.

41 SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) SINGAPORE 1 Chapter General aviation aircraft in Singapore are required to be registered in the Public Transport Category.

42 SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) SWEDEN 1 Chapter 1 Definitions Aerodrome operating minima. Not explicitly defined, but partly covered by other definitions. Approach and landing operations using instrument approach procedures. Not explicitly defined, but partly covered by other definitions. Approach and landing operations with vertical guidance. Not defined. Decision altitude (DA) or decision height (DH). Only precision approach is included in the definition. Maintenance programme. Not explicitly defined, but partly covered by other definitions. Chapter Briefing card is not included among the mandatory items in the passenger briefing Swedish regulations only demand carrying of oxygen and breathing equipment, not that it must be used The pilot-in-command is not explicitly responsible for the fitness of the flight crew members Not implemented. Chapter b) Partly covered d) Not implemented. 3) and 4) Not implemented b) and c) The altimeter is not required to be of a sensitive type and no timepiece is required for VFR operations Not implemented. 6.9 Swedish regulations require GPWS on aircraft with maximum take-off mass exceeding kg or more than 30 passenger seats and do not require the forward looking terrain avoidance function Metal foil FDR recorders are still allowed Not implemented

43 2 SWEDEN SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) to Partly covered Not implemented Not implemented. Chapter No 90-day requirement after permanent withdrawal of unit from service Not implemented.

44 SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) UGANDA 1 Chapter Not implemented. 6.4

45 SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) UNITED KINGDOM 1 Chapter 1 Definitions Pilot-in-command. In United Kingdom legislation, pilot-in-command in relation to an aircraft means a person who for the time being is in charge of the piloting of the aircraft without being under the direction of any other pilot in the aircraft. Chapter The commander of the aircraft must be satisfied before flight that the flight can be safely made, taking into account the weather reports and forecasts and any alternative course of action in case the flight cannot be completed as planned The requirement to discontinue the flight towards the destination is not mandated. 4.9 Oxygen requirements are not mandated Oxygen requirements are not mandated. Chapter The following are not required to be approved: maps, charts and codes; first-aid equipment; timepieces; torches; whistles; sea anchors; rocket signals; equipment for mooring, anchoring and manoeuvring on water; paddles; food and water; stoves, cooking utensils, snow shovels, ice saws, sleeping bags, arctic suits; and megaphones a), b) and c) 1) The requirements for a first-aid kit, fire extinguishers and seats are not mandated for all types of flight The method of marking break-in areas may differ The method of marking break-in areas may differ Seaplane special equipment is not mandated United Kingdom relies on provision of guidance material. United Kingdom recommendations on life jackets and rafts provide a higher level of safety. 6.4 Signalling devices and lifesaving equipment are not mandated for areas where search and rescue would be especially difficult. 6.7 c), e) and f) A landing light, passenger compartment lights, and torches for each crew member station, are not mandated TAWS Class B parameters are not specified in CAA regulatory material Use of photographic film flight data recorders has not been prohibited from 1 January 2003.

46 2 UNITED KINGDOM SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) The requirements for recording, correlation and duration of data link communications are not mandated for new aeroplanes from 1 January The requirements for recording, correlation and duration of data link communications are not mandated for new aeroplanes from 1 January The requirement to record the content and time of data link messages is not mandated The parameters for Type IA flight data recorders are not specified in United Kingdom regulatory material Type I flight data recorders are not mandated for all categories of certificates of airworthiness for aeroplanes over kg maximum certificated take-off mass The requirement for Type IA flight data recorders in new aeroplanes over kg from 1 January 2005 is not mandated Cockpit voice recorders are not mandated for all categories of certificates of airworthiness for aeroplanes over kg maximum certificated take-off mass The requirement for the cockpit voice recorder in new aeroplanes over kg from 1 January 2003 to retain the last two hours of information is not mandated The ELT requirements applicable until 1 January 2005 for extended flights over water and designated land areas as described in 6.4 are not mandated The automatic ELT requirements for extended flights over water and designated land areas as described in 6.4 are not mandated for new aeroplanes from 1 January The automatic ELT requirements for extended flights over water and designated land areas as described in 6.4 are not mandated for all aeroplanes from 1 January Partially implemented. United Kingdom requires pressure-altitude reporting transponder for flights in designated airspace * Not implemented. Chapter United Kingdom requires radio communication equipment for IFR flights in controlled and notified airspace. Gliders are excepted Radio communication equipment capable of communicating on prescribed frequencies is not mandated for extended flights over water and designated land areas as described in 6.4.

47 SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) UNITED KINGDOM 3 Chapter The operator is responsible for maintenance

48 SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) UNITED STATES 1 General The does not accept any provision of Annexes 2, 6, 10 or 11 or any other Annex as a Standard or Recommended Practice as applicable to State aircraft. In accordance with Article 3(a) of the Convention on International Civil Aviation, the Convention and its Annexes are not applicable to State aircraft. In so far as any provisions of Annexes 2, 6, 10 or 11 address the operation or control of State aircraft, the considers such provisions to be in the nature of a special recommendation of the Council, advisory only, and not requiring the filing of differences under Article 38 of the Convention. Chapter 1 Definitions Note. The expresses distances in terms of feet and miles rather than metres. A significant number of North American operators and aircraft are not equipped with metric unit displays. Approach and landing operations using instrument approach procedures. Category I (CAT I) operation. For a Category I operation, the requires a decision height (DH) of not less than 200 ft (60 m) and either visibility of not less than one-half mile (800 m) or a runway visual range of ft (732 m) (RVR ft (548 m) with operative touchdown zone and runway centre line lights). Category II (CAT II) operation. The requires that Category II provide approaches to minima of less than 200 ft (60 m) decision height/2 400 ft (732 m) runway visual range to as low as 100 ft (30 m) decision height/1 200 ft (365 m) runway visual range. Category IIIB (CAT IIIB) operation. The criteria are the same as those adopted in Annex 6, Part II. However, the runway visual range is expressed in feet less than 700 ft (200 m) but not less than 150 ft (50 m). Minimum descent altitude (MDA) or minimum descent height (MDH). The does not use the term MDH (or height above aerodrome) to describe an altitude or height in a non-precision approach or circling approach below which descent must be made without the required visual reference. Chapter 3 3.5* The pilot-in-command is not required to have available on board the aeroplane information concerning search and rescue services. Chapter 4 General In addition to the flight preparation requirements of Annex 6, Part II, Chapter 4, the requires -registered large or turbine-powered multi-engined general aviation, passenger-carrying aircraft, wherever operated, to adequately secure and stow food, beverage, and passenger service equipment during aircraft movement on the surface, take-off and landing.

49 2 UNITED STATES SUPPLEMENT TO ANNEX 6, PART II (SIXTH EDITION) Except for large and turbine-powered multi-engined aeroplanes, the does not require the pilot-in-command to ensure that crew members and passengers are familiar with the location and use of emergency exits, life jackets, oxygen dispensing equipment or other emergency equipment provided for individual use Except for large and turbine-powered multi-engined aeroplanes, the does not require the pilot-in-command to ensure that all persons on board are aware of the location and general manner of use of the principal emergency equipment carried for collective use The does not require a destination alternate aerodrome when the weather at the aerodrome of intended landing is forecast to have a ceiling of at least ft (600 m) and a visibility of at least 3 miles (4.8 km). In addition, standard alternate aerodrome minima are prescribed 600 ft (185 m) ceiling and 2 miles (3.2 km) visibility for precision approaches, and 800 ft (243 m) ceiling and 2 miles (3.2 km) visibility for non-precision approaches b) Under regulations, the forecast period for the destination alternate aerodrome is from one hour before to one hour after the estimated time of arrival. In addition, the minima for ceiling/visibility at the aerodrome of intended landing are ft (600 m) and 3 miles (4.8 km); that is, when at least such minima exist, no alternate aerodrome is required In addition to the Standard prescribed in Annex 6, Part II, 4.6.4, the prohibits a pilot from taking off a -registered large or turbine-powered multi-engined general aviation aeroplane if there is frost, snow, or ice adhering to critical systems, components and surfaces of the aircraft The pilot-in-command is not required to ensure that all persons on board the aircraft during an emergency are instructed in emergency procedures The does not specify the authority, qualifications or competency of persons permitted to taxi aeroplanes on the movement area of an aerodrome * The has no provisions concerning aircraft refuelling with passengers on board * Chapter 6 General In addition to the aeroplane instruments and equipment Standards prescribed in Annex 6, Part II, Chapter 6, the requires that all -registered turbojet-powered aeroplanes, wherever operated, be equipped with an altitude alerting system or device. The also requires that all transport category aeroplanes used in air commerce in the and all -registered transport category aeroplanes used in air commerce outside the United States must use an aural speed warning device The requires that all large and turbine-powered multi-engined general aviation aircraft of registry have the following emergency equipment in addition to the equipment specified in Annex 6, Part II, 6.1.3: two fire extinguishers in the passenger compartment of aircraft accommodating 30 or more passengers; a crash axe for aeroplanes accommodating more than 19 passengers; a portable megaphone for aeroplanes seating more than 60 but less than 100 passengers, and two megaphones for aeroplanes with a seating capacity of more than 100 passengers.