including the Sherman Pass Scenic Byway. 1

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "including the Sherman Pass Scenic Byway. 1"

Transcription

1 This document is submitted as part of the analysis file for the Sherman Pass Project Environmental Assessment. Knowledge of the planning area was developed through five half-day and two full-day field tours and discussions with the West Zone s Outdoor Recreation Planner, Forest Landscape Architect, and West Zone Silviculturist. Management Framework The primary management authorities for recreation and related resources are the Term Permit Act of 1915 (38 Stat. 1101, as amended; 16 USC 497), the Multiple Use Sustained-Yield Act of June 12, 1960 (74 Stat. 215, as amended; 16 USC ), the 1964 Wilderness Act (16 USC ), and the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (Pub. L ; 80 Stat. 915; 16 USC 470 et seq.). General management direction for recreation is supplied by the 1988 Colville National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan Forestwide Standards and Guidelines on pages 4-35 through Direction specific to management areas within the planning area can be found on pages 4-69 to 4-72 (MA 1), 4-77 to 4-79 (MA 3A), 4-89 to 4-91 (MA4), 4-93 to 4-96 (MA 5), 4-97 to (MA 6), to (MA7), to (MA 8), to (MA 10) and to (MA 11). Affected Environment/Existing Condition The Sherman Pass Project area consists of National Forest System lands located along the eastern and western slopes of the Kettle Crest both north and south of State Highway 20. The northern boundary is generally described by a line ranging from one to three miles north of State Highway 20 that extends from the Forest s eastern boundary with the Sherman Creek State Wildlife Recreation Area west towards Graves Mountain and along the hydrologic divide between Deadman Creek and Sherman Creek to the top of the Kettle Crest, then turning south through Jungle Hill and Columbia Mountain back to State Highway 20. The southern boundary is generally described by a line ranging from one to three miles south of State Highway 20 that extends from the Forest s eastern boundary with the Sherman Creek State Wildlife Recreation Area west along the hydrologic divide between Sherman Creek and the Columbia River towards Bangs Mountain, then west towards the hydrologic divide between the South Fork Sherman Creek and Sherman Creek to Sherman Peak, heading south along the Kettle Crest to Snow Peak, then turning west along the hydrologic divide between South Fork O Brien Creek and North Fork O Brien Creek to Murphy Hill, then Southwest to within about ½ mile of Quartz Mountain and then turning northwest towards the Forest s western boundary at the corner of sections 21, 27, and 28. The area View of the western portion of the planning area including the Sherman Pass Scenic Byway. Eastern view of the planning area from the Kettle Crest. 1

2 consists of National Forest Lands that exist within the North Fork O Brien Creek and Sherman Creek watersheds. Elevations range from approximately 2,080 feet along Sherman Creek on the far eastern boundary of the project area to over 7,000 feet along the high points of the Kettle Crest. A system of Forest roads and trails provides visitors with easy access throughout the planning area. State Highway 20, the Sherman Pass Scenic Byway, offers travelers the best panoramic views of the planning area. Likewise, the Kettle Crest National Recreation Trail, part of the Pacific Northwest National Scenic Trail Corridor, offers excellent views of the planning area both north and south of State Highway 20. In general, the area consists of lightly to densely forested north and east slopes with natural openings along many of the south and west slopes and ridgelines. Areas adjacent to State Highway 20 show little signs of recent management while some areas adjacent to the non-paved road system have been harvested in the past, providing management created openings and thinned timber stands. Both the natural and management created openings are used for recreational parking and overnight camping. The heaviest recreational use in the planning area occurs primarily during the summer and fall, although a considerable amount of winter recreation occurs on the designated trails within the planning area. Types of recreation use within the planning area includes: developed and dispersed camping, visiting developed scenic overlooks and historic sites, scenic driving, hiking, mountain biking, pack and saddle stock use, hunting, berry picking, firewood gathering, fishing, picnicking, Nordic skiing, backcountry skiing, snowshoeing, snowmobiling, and Off Highway Vehicle (OHV) use. Developed Recreation Several developed recreation sites are located within the Sherman Pass Project area including: two campgrounds, a scenic overlook, three interpretive/heritage sites with picnic area facilities, three trailheads (two with horse camping facilities), and two designated sno-parks. Campgrounds Canyon Creek Campground is a small fee campground located just south of State Highway 20 off Forest Road This moderately used, development scale three (Moderate Site Modification/Investment) campground consists of twelve campsites, two large parking areas and two vault toilets. The campground also accesses a one mile scenic trail (Canyon Creek Trail #93) along Sherman Creek that connects with the Log Flume Heritage Site. The area is very popular for huckleberry picking and is used heavily on summer weekends. Site amenities (tables, grills, signs, etc.) are in generally good condition with little deferred maintenance. Entrance to Sherman Overlook Campground. Typical Campsite at Canyon Creek Campground. 2

3 Sherman Overlook Campground is a small fee campground located just north of State Highway 20, approximately one mile east of Sherman Pass. This lightly used high elevation campground provides the only source of potable water along the Sherman Pass Scenic Byway between Kettle Falls and Republic. The campground meets development scale three (Moderate Site Modification/Investment) classification guidelines and contains nine campsites, a single vault toilet, a handpump water system, and the entrance to Sherman Tie Trail #96. Site amenities (table, grills, signs, etc.) are in generally good condition with little deferred maintenance. The entrance to the campground is shared with Sherman Overlook, which lies just east of the Campground. Vegetation within both campgrounds is diverse; however, much of the overstory is comprised of mature lodgepole pine and larch. The lodgepole has been recently infected with the mountain pine beetle and heavy mortality has already occurred in Sherman Overlook Campground and is expected to occur over the next 3-5 years in Canyon Creek Campground. Extensive hazard tree removal has been occurring at the campground since Both campgrounds are in need of vegetation plans that would define the preferred mix of tree species, spacing, and removal timeline for the existing overstory vegetation. Implementation of approved vegetation plans should enhance the long-term resiliency of the sites to future mortality, ensure adequate screening between sites, encourage proper placement of shade trees and, in general, improve the quality of each campground s recreation setting. Scenic Overlook Sherman Pass Scenic Overlook is a fully wheelchair accessible development scale four (Heavy Site Modification/ High Investment) recreation site. The site was reconstructed in 2008 as part of the Sherman Pass Scenic Byway improvement project and has well-maintained amenities with little deferred maintenance. The site offers three picnic sites, a double unit outhouse, two interpretive kiosks, and a 0.4 mile paved interpretive trail. Vegetation within the site is diverse; however, much of the overstory is comprised of mature lodgepole pine and larch. The lodgepole has been recently infected with the mountain pine beetle and heavy mortality has already occurred at the site. Extensive hazard tree removal has been occurring at the overlook since The Overlook is in need of a vegetation plan that would define the preferred mix of tree species, spacing, and removal timeline for the remaining overstory vegetation. Implementation of an approved vegetation plan should enhance the long-term resiliency of the site to future mortality, ensure adequate screening between the site and the road, encourage proper viewshed maintenance and improve the quality of the recreation setting. Accessible trail with interpretive kiosk and down lodgepole pine caused by pine beetle mortality. Southwest view from entrance to overlook taken in early June. 3

4 Interpretive/Heritage Sites The Log Flume Heritage Site is a primary stop along the Sherman Pass Scenic Byway. The site is wheelchair accessible and designed/built to development scale four (Heavy Site Modification/High Investment) guidelines. The site offers several picnic sites, large paved parking areas, a double unit outhouse, life size interpretive displays and a 0.7 mile paved interpretive trail. This site also acts as a secondary trailhead to the wheelchair accessible, paved Canyon Creek Trail #93 that connects with Canyon Creek Campground. The site is in generally good condition. However, the site does require new interpretive signs and the completion of an interpretive kiosk associated with the Scenic Byway Improvement Project completed in Camp Growden is also a primary stop along the Sherman Pass Scenic Byway. This development scale four (Heavy Site Modification/High Investment) interpretive site offers a short interpretive trail, a couple of picnic sites, a double unit outhouse, and a couple of historic structures (changing house and water fountain) built by the Civilian Conservation Corps. This site was partially reconstructed in and is also in need of new interpretive signs and the installation of an interpretive kiosk planned during the Scenic Byway Improvement Project. The Sherman Pass Scenic Byway interpretive stop sits north of State Highway 20 at the top of Sherman Pass. This development scale three (Moderate Site Modification/Moderate Investment) interpretive pullout consists of a large parking area and an interpretive kiosk. The site is surrounded by rock and the highway, with little vegetation. The site is in good condition but could use additional surfacing material along the seam of the graveled parking area and paved highway where storm run-off has caused erosion. Sherman Pass Scenic Byway interpretive kiosk. Winter view of the Kettle Crest Scenic Byway site marker. Vegetation within the Log Flume site is diverse with a fairly dense overstory and shrub component. Camp Growden, on the other hand, offers a limited amount of mature overstory trees and much less ground cover and shrubs. The overstory in both sites has a high component of mature lodgepole pine which, at this time, appears to be free of mortality caused by the mountain pine beetle. However, mountain pine beetle mortality is expected in both sites over the next 3-5 years as the current population of beetles continues to spread to new suitable habitats along State Highway 20. Therefore, both interpretive sites would benefit from vegetation plans that would define the preferred mix of tree species, spacing, and removal timeline for the existing overstory vegetation. Implementation of approved 4

5 vegetation plans should enhance the long-term resiliency of the sites to future mortality, ensure adequate screening between the sites and the Highway 20, and improve the quality of each sites recreation setting. Trailheads Sherman Creek Trailhead is located on Forest Road (FR) , near the entrance to Canyon Creek Campground. The trailhead was constructed in 2013 and consists of a small (2-3 car) parking area with rock barriers. This development scale two (Minimal Site Modification/Some Investment) trailhead receives low to moderate use during the summer months. The trailhead is in need of a paved path to connect the parking area with the trail, a registration box and an information board. Both of these items are scheduled to be completed in This trailhead is in good condition, requiring only annual maintenance to meet operation and maintenance (O&M) standards. Jungle Hill Trailhead is located on FR approximately ½ mile north of State Highway 20. This development scale three (Moderate Site Modification/Moderate Investment) trailhead consists of a single vault toilet, information board, registration box, unloading ramp, several stock ties, and a large parking area. The trailhead also provides five campsites designed for stock use, including a table, fire grill, pullthrough parking, and high-line posts. The trailhead and camping area receive moderate use throughout the summer and fall. This trailhead is in good condition, requiring only annual maintenance to meet operation and maintenance (O&M) standards. This trailhead is located within the Profanity Inventoried Roadless Area. As a result, commercial vegetation treatments to improve vegetation conditions are not permitted. Jungle Hill Trailhead. Canyon Creek Trailhead. Kettle Crest Trailhead on Sherman Pass is located on FR immediately north of State Highway 20. This development scale three (Moderate Site Modification/Moderate Investment) trailhead consists of a single vault toilet, information board, registration box, several stock ties, and a large parking area. The trailhead also provides three campsites designed for stock use. All of these sites offer parking and a fire grill, while two of the sites also offer a table. The trailhead and camping area receives moderate use throughout the summer and fall with heavy use on summer weekends. This trailhead is in need of new stock ties, a drainage structure on the entrance road, and a new table. Each of these facilities were damaged while removing mountain pine beetle infested trees from the site over the past two years. Vegetation within the three trailheads consists primarily of low growing groundcover and lodgepole pine with some larch in the overstory. The lodgepole pine within the Kettle Crest Trailhead has been recently 5

6 infected with the mountain pine beetle and heavy mortality with extensive hazard tree removal has already occurred at the site over the past two years. Mountain pine beetle mortality can also be found in the Jungle Hill Trailhead and immediately adjacent to the Sherman Creek Trailhead within Canyon Creek Campground. As a result, additional lodgepole pine mortality is expected to occur over the next 3-5 years in Jungle Hill and Sherman Creek Trailheads. All three trailheads are in need of vegetation plans that would define the preferred mix of tree species, spacing, and removal timeline for the remaining overstory vegetation. Implementation of approved vegetation plans should enhance the long-term resiliency of the sites to future mortality, ensure adequate screening between sites, encourage proper placement of shade trees and, in general, improve the quality of each trailhead s recreation setting. Kettle Crest Trailhead camping area with down Kettle Crest Sno-park information board and toilet lodgepole pine and a damaged table resulting from facility prior to lodgepole removal in hazard tree removal. Sno-parks The planning area contains two Washington State designated sno-parks. The Kettle Crest Sno-Park is located at the top of Sherman Pass and shares the same facilities as the Kettle Crest Trailhead. This snopark provides access to backcountry skiing and snowshoeing opportunities along the Kettle Crest as well as overnight parking accommodations for recreationists that reserve the Snow Peak backcountry cabin. This sno-park is moderately used throughout the winter and heavily used on winter weekends and holidays. Washington State Sno-park permits are required to park at this area from December 1 st through March 31 st. Permit fees are used by the state to plow the parking area and maintain the facilities at the site. The Albian Hill Sno-Park is located just north of State Highway 20 at the base of the Albian Hill Road (FR 2030). This sno-park accesses an extensive groomed snowmobile trail system. The sno-park consists of a small to medium sized parking area that includes FR 2030 and a large pull-out adjacent to the road and an information board. When funding is available, the site also includes a portable toilet facility. No other facilities are provided at this location. This sno-park is moderately used throughout the winter and heavily used on winter weekends and holidays. Washington State Sno-park permits are required to park at this area from December 1 st through March 31 st. Permit fees are used by the state to plow the parking area, maintain the facilities at the site, and groom the trail system. 6

7 Dispersed Recreation Numerous forms of dispersed recreation occur throughout the Sherman Pass planning area in levels varying from seldom to frequently, depending on the activity. The most prominent forms of dispersed recreation (in no order of importance) occurring within the planning area include: camping, scenic driving, hiking, mountain biking, pack and saddle stock use, hunting, berry picking, firewood gathering, fishing, picnicking, shooting, Nordic skiing, backcountry skiing, snowshoeing, snowmobiling, and Off Highway Vehicle (OHV) use. Dispersed Camping Dispersed campsites are spread throughout the planning area. These campsites generally develop over many years as a result of impacts associated with recreational use (loss of ground vegetation as a result of vehicle use, construction of rock fire rings, etc.). Most dispersed campsites within the planning area are located in small openings adjacent to Forest System roads, with a few campsites located along the road prism or at the end of system roads. Several of these sites are located in lodgepole pine stands that show signs of mountain pine beetle mortality and will likely be in need of hazard tree removal and reforestation within the next 3-5 years in order to remain safe for visitors and provide adequate vegetation for screening and shade. Based on the level of soil disturbance, rock fire ring construction, tree damage, and user created structures (toilets, benches, deer racks, etc.), it appears that many of these dispersed campsites receive heavy use on a regular basis throughout the summer months and into the fall hunting season. These significant dispersed recreation sites (Colville National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan pg. 4-36) are of high value to the recreating public and frequently provide a nice mix of shade, open parking/camping area, views, and privacy. Twenty-one significant dispersed campsites were identified and recorded during field surveys, which represents just over 50% of the inventoried dispersed campsites within the planning area. The following pictures are just a couple examples of heavy use dispersed campsites within the planning area. Dispersed campsite along FR with large parking area and fire pit. Dispersed campsite on FR with numerous constructed features and loss of ground vegetation. About half (49%) of the inventoried dispersed campsites located in the planning area appear to be used on an irregular basis, either as an opportunistic place to set up camp before dark, or during hunting season when dispersed campsites within the planning area receive their heaviest use. This assessment is based on the lack of soil disturbance, small fire rings, lack of tree scarring, and high degree of vegetation growing in the fire rings and campsite area. The following pictures represent examples of low-use dispersed campsites within the planning area. 7

8 Dispersed campsite located near end of FR Small grown in firering with old game hanger and no exposed soil. Dispersed campsite located in a pullout along FR Small grown in fire ring, heavy vegetation on parking area. Scenic Driving Sightseeing and driving for pleasure occurs primarily on State Highway 20, the Sherman Pass Scenic Highway. This road is used as part of a larger loop which includes State Highway 21, County Road 602 (Boulder Deer Creek Highway), and US Highway 395, all of which are outside the planning area. Sightseeing/driving for pleasure occurs throughout the summer travel season and into the fall when the numerous stands of western larch and cottonwood turn the hillsides and river corridor into several shades of gold. Other routes used for sightseeing and driving for pleasure include FR 2030 (Albian Hill Road) and FR (Bangs Mountain Road). The majority of both of these routes are located outside of the planning area. Hunting Hunting (primarily deer and turkey) activities occur throughout the planning area. The area s welldeveloped Forest Service road and trail systems provide hunters with easy access to thousands of acres of lightly used terrain. In addition, the abundance of dispersed campsites along with the availability of two developed campgrounds and two trailheads with camping facilities makes getting an early start easy. At times, this area can be intensely hunted and receives consistent use by hunters throughout the late summer, fall, and early winter. Picnicking/Berry Picking Picnicking and berry picking occur throughout the planning area and are supported by the well-developed Forest Service road and trail system. This activity peaks during mid to late summer depending on the elevation and is centered around the huckleberry season. The area around Canyon Creek Campground is of special interest for berry picking and receives heavy day-use and overnight use during the period when huckleberries are ripe and most abundant. Shooting Shooting occurs throughout the planning area, but is heaviest within the Lane Creek Pit where multiple constructed targets set at various distances can be regularly observed. 8

9 Firewood Firewood cutting is limited to the opportunities on the 2013 Colville National Forest Firewood Cutting and Removal Map. All roads open to vehicle traffic on the 2013 Colville National Forest Motor Vehicle Use Map Southwest Area are open to firewood cutting except for those associated with the developed recreation sites listed in this report. Firewood cutting is, however, seasonally restricted between December 1 st and March 31 st on designated winter recreation routes (FRs 2030 and 2053) and in big game winter range including FRs , , , and all roads accessed by the and road systems. The planning area receives consistent use by firewood cutters throughout the late spring, summer, fall and early winter. Use occurs on almost every road accessible with a pickup truck. Fishing Fishing opportunities are quite limited within the planning area due to a lack of larger water bodies capable of sustaining this activity. The limited amount of fishing that occurs within the planning area is located almost entirely along Sherman Creek and the lower section of South Fork Sherman Creek. Snowshoeing/Backcountry Skiing/Nordic Skiing Snowshoeing, Backcountry Skiing, and Nordic Skiing are all popular activities at the higher elevations (Karamip Road on the west side to Albian Hill Road on the east side of Sherman Pass) within the planning area. The majority of this use occurs north and south of Sherman Pass along the Kettle Crest and originates out of the Kettle Crest Sno-park. Additional use occurs along the power corridor when snow conditions are acceptable. This area generally receives a quality snow pack and has easy paved access for passenger vehicles. As a result, the Kettle Crest receives consistent moderate to heavy use by residents of eastern Washington. In addition, the popularity of Snow Peak Cabin (located just outside of the planning area) brings many recreationists from the west side of Washington and numerous neighboring states each winter to recreate along the Kettle Crest as well. On good snow years, Nordic skiing and snowshoeing also occur along lower elevation roads accessed from pull-outs adjacent to State Highway 20. Snowmobiling Snowmobiling occurs primarily on the three designated snowmobile routes (FRs 2020, 2030 and 2053) within the Sherman Pass Project area. FRs 2030 (Albian Hill) and 2053 (Quartz Mountain) are both designated groomed snowmobile routes which are part of the Washington State Sno-park program. FR 2020 is a designated non-groomed snowmobile route that is accessed by small plowed pull-outs near the entrance to the road along State Highway 20. Use in the planning area is light on weekdays throughout the winter, but consistent. Weekend and holiday use is generally moderate to heavy, depending on snow conditions. Rarely does snowmobile use occur off designated routes or their connected road systems either as a result of inconsistent snow, limited terrain, seasonal use restrictions, or a lack of safe, offhighway parking areas. The only consistent off trail use occurs along the power corridor on the east side of Sherman Pass. This use is generally light and increases during good snow years. Trails All or part of eleven designated system trails are located in the Sherman Pass Project Area: Snow Peak Trail #10, Kettle Crest Trail #13 North, Kettle Crest Trail #13 South, Jungle Hill Trail #16, Columbia Mountain Trail #24, Columbia Mountain Spur Trail #24.1, Sherman Peak Loop Trail #72, Sherman Pass Trail #82, Canyon Creek Trail #93, Sherman Tie Trail #96, and Sherman Overlook Trail #96.A. All of these trails except Canyon Creek Trail #93 contain segments that are relatively high in elevation (over 4,300 feet), allowing trail users to enjoy panoramic views of distant valleys and mountains. The majority of these trails that are located west of the Kettle Crest are located within the 1988 White Mountain fire scar. As a result, these trails have extensive segments running through standing dead forests which 9

10 require frequent logout to keep open. All of these trails are in good condition and have received annual maintenance in the past. However, all of the trails in the vicinity of Sherman Pass are located within stands of lodgepole pine. These stands have been experiencing heavy mountain pine beetle mortality. As a result, hazard tree removal and logout efforts are expected to grow substantially over the next 3-5 years. Winter snowmobile routes within the planning area exist entirely on designated road systems and are discussed immediately above under the heading Snowmobiling. Snow Peak Trail #10 parallels a short segment of the planning area s southern boundary just west of the Kettle Crest. This trail provides easy access to the Kettle Crest Trail and Snow Peak Cabin (which sits just south of the planning area). The trail receives moderate use throughout the summer and fall from hikers, mountain bikers, and equestrian riders. The trail receives little to no winter use. The Kettle Crest Trail # 13 North and the Kettle Crest Trail #13 South (KCNRT) are both classified as a National Recreation Trail and are also part of the newly designated Pacific Northwest National Scenic Trail corridor. Over one mile of each of these trails is located within the planning area. However, only 0.12 miles of the Kettle Crest 13 North and 0.53 miles of the Kettle Crest 13 South Trails are outside of the Profanity and Bald-Snow Potential Wilderness Areas (respectively) and may be located within a vegetative treatment unit. The trails are used consistently throughout the year by hikers, equestrian riders, mountain bikers, hunters, Nordic skiers, backcountry skiers, snowshoers and nature enthusiasts. The section of trail located within the planning area receives heavy use during the summer and fall. Winter use is somewhat less, but consistent, as snowshoers, Nordic and backcountry skiers use the trail to access the Columbia Mountain lookout, Snow Peak Cabin, and quality backcountry ski terrain. The KCNRT and its feeder trails provide a multi-season, multi-user recreation experience that is regionally significant (mountain bikes, equestrian riders, backcountry skiing) and nationally recognized. Its inclusion in 2009 as part of the Pacific Northwest National Scenic Trail corridor simply added to its appeal as a trail destination for non-local backcountry trail enthusiasts. Jungle Hill Trail #16 is located completely within the planning area and provides easy access to the Kettle Crest NRT. The trail is popular with mountain bikers, hikers, and equestrian riders and receives moderate use throughout the summer and fall. The trail receives little to no winter use. This trail is located primarily in the Profanity Potential Wilderness Area (PWA). Jungle Hill Trail looking east. Sherman Peak Loop Trail in

11 White Mountain burn area. The east half of the Columbia Mountain Trail #24 loop is located in the planning area. The Columbia Mountain Spur Trail #24.1 is located on the western boundary of the planning area, just north of Sherman Pass. These trails provide easy access to the historic Columbia Mountain Fire Lookout and are popular with mountain bikers, equestrian riders and hikers throughout the summer and fall. In the winter, these trails are popular with Nordic skiers and snowshoers. Use of the trail is moderate throughout the summer, fall, and winter and heavy on weekends and holidays. These trails are located entirely in the Profanity PWA. Sherman Peak Loop Trail #72 is located entirely within the planning area. This loop trail is popular with hikers, mountain bikers, and equestrian riders during the summer and fall. During the winter, the trail is used by snowshoers, Nordic skiers, and backcountry skiers. This is the primary access trail into the Snow Peak Cabin during the winter. Use of the trail is moderate throughout the summer, fall, and winter and heavy on weekends and holidays. This trail is located entirely within the Bald-Snow PWA. Sherman Pass Trail #82 connects the Jungle Hill Trailhead with the Kettle Crest Trailhead. The trail is located entirely within the planning area and is used as part of a loop that includes trails 13N and 16. The trail receives light to moderate use from hikers, mountain bikers, and equestrian riders during the summer and fall. This trail is located along the southeast boundary of the Profanity PWA. Canyon Creek Trail #93 is a paved wheelchair accessible trail that parallels Sherman Creek and connects Canyon Creek Campground with the Log Flume Interpretive Site. The trail is located entirely within the planning area and receives high use during the summer months from hikers and bikers. A short segment of washed out trail was rerouted in The eastern and western ends of the trail are located in stands of lodgepole pine. As a result, mountain pine beetle mortality is expected to increase the need for hazard tree removal along this trail over the next 3-5 years. Bridge on the Sherman Tie Trail. Sherman Overlook Interpretive Trail with slash from mountain pine beetle mortality adjacent to trail. Sherman Tie Trail #96 is a short trail located entirely within the planning area that connects Sherman Overlook Campground with trail #82. The trail is open to mountain bikers and hikers and receives light to moderate summer and fall use. In the winter, the trail receives consistent light use by snowshoers and skiers. This trail is located partially within the Profanity PWA. 11

12 Sherman Overlook Trail #96.A is a short, wheelchair accessible, paved interpretive trail located entirely within the planning area. The trail is open to foot traffic only and receives high use throughout the summer and fall. The trail is located in a stand of lodgepole pine and larch. The lodgepole has experienced heavy mountain pine beetle mortality over the last two years and has been closed to use for public safety while hazard tree removal and clean-up has occurred. These clean-up efforts are expected to continue for the next 2-3 years. Motorized (OHV) Recreation Light to moderate OHV use has occurred historically throughout the planning area. Early use was predominantly by jeeps and motorcycles. This use has transitioned over the past decade to primarily four wheel OHVs (quads, ATVs, UTVs). Prior to the implementation of the Colville National Forest - Interim Motor Vehicle Use Map in 2006, this use occurred without designation or enforcement of routes. There are currently 18 designated routes for OHV use within the Sherman Pass Project area shown on the 2013 Colville National Forest Motor Vehicle Use Map, Southwest Area (MVUM). Table 1: Road Numbers of Designated OHV Routes The route is part of a large loop system located outside of the planning area. Those routes ending in the 200s and 300s (except for 382) are part of an extensive out-and-back road system that incorporates a couple of short loop opportunities. The road is an isolated out-and-back route. The and those roads ending in the 400s are part of two small out-and-back road system that have a main stem with a couple of side roads attached. In general, quality OHV riding opportunities are limited in the planning area. Additional motorized routes were proposed by OHV users to be included on the MVUM within the planning area during travel management collaboration meetings between 2005 and These routes included numerous open and closed roads in the following areas: Albian Hill, Bangs Mountain, Fritz Creek, Graves Mountain, Scalawag Ridge, Milk Creek, South Fork Sherman Creek, and Trout Creek to Lane Creek. Roads associated with these proposed routes are listed in the following table. Table 2: Roads Proposed as OHV Routes These proposed routes could be combined to provide several large loop opportunities both north and south of State Highway 20 and connect with other proposed routes located outside of the planning area. This opportunity would require the construction of new OHV trail between Trout Creek and Lane Creek, Milk Creek and Graves Mountain, Hart Creek and Milk Creek, and McGahee Creek and Albian Hill. In several areas, these trails could be located on existing non-system road templates. Although OHV use is generally light within the planning area, there continues to be interest from local OHV users and the Tri-County Motorized Recreation Association to provide for a system of OHV trails on the Forest that connects communities and provides loop riding opportunities. These traits were clearly identified by participants at the South End Motor Vehicle Use Project public meetings in 2009 as being important to the OHV experience on the Colville National Forest. 12

13 Currently, light to moderate levels of illegal (defined as use occurring on routes not identified on the current MVUM) OHV use is occurring throughout the majority of the planning area. Off-road illegal use is heaviest in the Lane Creek area and near well-established dispersed campsites in the Canyon Creek area. Additional illegal off-road use occurs along FR , FR , within the planning area s gravel pits and along the powerline corridor. Many of these unauthorized routes probably existed well OHV trail leading out of a dispersed campsite near Canyon Creek CG. Illegal OHV use out the end of FR in the Lane Creek area. before off road travel was prohibited in 2006 with the printing of the Colville National Forest Interim MVUM and continues to occur as users follow their historic trails. Most closed and open roads within the planning area show minimal impacts from OHV use during the summer months. However, incidents of illegal use and associated impacts from OHVs generally increase during hunting season. Based on my professional judgment, I believe that historic OHV use, combined with the current popularity of OHVs (in general) and the lack of quality riding opportunities within the Sherman Pass planning area has, in numerous locations, resulted in the continued unauthorized use of closed routes or the development of user created routes that conflict with resource and recreation management objectives. Berms and ditches (tank traps) have proven effective against full-size vehicles, but are not as effective against unauthorized access by OHVs within the planning area. While most users respect the intent of road closures, once a closure is breached, other users often become opportunistic and follow the tracks into the closed areas. Potential Wilderness Area The Sherman Pass Project area encompasses the eastern half of the southern tip of the Profanity (37,712 acres) Potential Wilderness Area (PWA), the northern tip of the Bald-Snow (20,432 acres) PWA, the western portion of the Hoodoo (11,695 acres) PWA, and the northeastern tip of the South Huckleberry (9,939 acres) PWA. There are six other PWAs (Cougar Mountain, Deer Creek, Jackknife, Owl Mountain, Thirteenmile, and Twin Sisters) encompassing 58,968 acres within fifteen air miles of either the Profanity or Bald-Snow PWAs. All but Owl Mountain and Deer Creek are within fifteen air miles of both PWAs. Combined, these ten PWAs account for 138,747 acres within the Okanogan Highlands ecoregion on the Colville National Forest. 13

14 The following is taken from a briefing paper developed by the Colville and Okanogan-Wenatchee Forest Plan Revision Team in August of 2008 titled Briefing: Forest Plan Revision and Inventoried Roadless Areas, Potential Wilderness Areas, and possible Wilderness Recommendations. The briefing paper describes the process used to evaluate inventoried roadless areas on the Colville National Forest for inclusion onto the Potential Wilderness Area Inventory. In the summer of 2005, the Forest plan revision team for the Colville and Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forests began the process of evaluating inventoried roadless areas with the help of interested members of the public. The Forest Service uses inventory criteria from the Forest Service Handbook to evaluate roadless areas for potential wilderness designation. These criteria have been in place since the 1970s. In order to qualify for placement on the inventory of potential wilderness areas, an inventoried roadless area has to meet one or more of the criteria. A few examples of the criteria follow: A potential wilderness area should contain 5,000 acres or more. A potential wilderness area can contain less than 5,000 acres due to physical terrain if it can be preserved; or the area is self-contained such as an island; or the area is contiguous to existing wilderness regardless of size. A potential wilderness area cannot contain forest roads or other permanently authorized roads. The first step of the evaluation process is to use the inventory criteria to validate the boundaries of the 2001 Roadless Rule inventory of roadless areas. Beginning in the summer of 2005, the Forest Service asked the public to participate in the review of inventoried roadless area boundaries through a series of public meetings, web site postings, and electronic and hard copy mailings/newsletters. The public provided the Forest Service with input, which the Forest Service validated. Then the Forest Service made adjustments to the inventoried roadless area boundaries based on a given area s current condition. The second step in the evaluation process is to carefully evaluate each validated inventoried roadless area as additions to the National Wilderness Preservation System. An area recommended as suitable for wilderness must meet the tests of capability, availability, and need. In addition to the inherent wilderness quality it possesses, an area must provide opportunities and experiences that are dependent upon or enhanced by a wilderness environment. Also considered was the ability of the Forest Service to manage the area as wilderness. Capability is further broken down into: 1) the level of natural and undeveloped environment, 2) the level of outstanding opportunities for solitude or primitive and unconfined recreation, 3) the special features, and 4) the manageability of the PWA boundaries. (Profanity, Bald-Snow, Hoodoo, and Wilderness Evaluations May-June 2009) Availability and need for wilderness are not discussed in the effects section of this report as those components are not directly affected by the Sherman Pass Project. The Profanity Roadless Area was assessed during the first and second Roadless Area Review and Evaluation (RARE I and RARE II) processes completed in 1973 and 1979 respectively. In 1973, it was not chosen for future wilderness study and in 1979 it was not recommended for wilderness designation. In 2006, analysis of the Profanity Roadless Area by the Forest Plan Revision Team (using the process described above) resulted in the removal of approximately 1,923 acres from the previous inventory due to nonconforming uses such as road construction and logging; 10,637 acres were added to the previous inventory as they met the criteria for a potential wilderness area as described in Forest Service Handbook (FSH) , Chapter 70. (Profanity Wilderness Evaluation, Forest Plan Revision Team, May-June 2009) The following chart depicts the current 1988 Colville National Forest Land and Resource 14

15 Management Plan direction for the land base identified in 2006 as the Profanity PWA. (Profanity Wilderness Evaluation, Forest Plan Revision Team, May-June 2009) Table 1--Management area percentages (rounded) for the Profanity PWA - Colville National Forest MA1 Old Growth Dependant Species Habitat MA11 Semi-primitive, Nonmotorized Recreation MA3A Recreation MA5 Scenic Timber MA7 Wood/ Forage 1% 60% 2% 16% 21% The Bald-Snow Roadless Area was assessed during the first and second Roadless Area Review and Evaluation (RARE I and RARE II) processes completed in 1973 and 1979 respectively. In 1973, it was identified but not chosen for future wilderness study and in 1979 it was identified as non-wilderness. In 2006, analysis of the Bald-Snow Roadless Area by the Forest Plan Revision Team (using the process described above) resulted in the removal of approximately 3,762 acres from the previous inventory due to nonconforming uses such as road construction and logging; 917 acres were added to the previous inventory as they met the criteria for a potential wilderness area as described in Forest Service Handbook (FSH) , Chapter 70. (Bald-Snow Wilderness Evaluation, Forest Plan Revision Team, May-June 2009) The following chart depicts the current 1988 Colville National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan direction for the land base identified in 2006 as the Bald-Snow PWA. (Bald-Snow Wilderness Evaluation, Forest Plan Revision Team, May-June 2009) Table 1--Management area percentages (rounded) for the Bald- Snow PWA - Colville National Forest MA11 Semi-primitive, Non-motorized Recreation MA3A Recreation MA4 Research Natural Area MA5 Scenic Timber MA7 Wood/ Forage 66% 3% 5% 21% 5% The Hoodoo Roadless Area was assessed during the first and second Roadless Area Review and Evaluation (RARE I and RARE II) processes completed in 1973 and 1979 respectively. In 1973, it was identified but not chosen for future wilderness study and in 1979 it was not recommended for wilderness designation. In 2006, analysis of the Hoodoo Roadless Area by the Forest Plan Revision Team (using the process described above) resulted in the removal of approximately 451 acres from the previous inventory due to nonconforming uses such as road construction and logging; 4,990 acres were added to the previous inventory as they met the criteria for a potential wilderness area as described in Forest Service Handbook (FSH) , Chapter 70. (Hoodoo Wilderness Evaluation, Forest Plan Revision Team, May-June 2009) The following chart depicts the current 1988 Colville National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan direction for the land base identified in 2006 as the Hoodoo PWA. (Hoodoo Wilderness Evaluation, Forest Plan Revision Team, May-June 2009) Table 1--Management area percentages (rounded) for the Hoodoo PWA - Colville National Forest MA1 Old Growth Dependent Species Habitat MA3A Recreation MA5 Scenic Timber MA7 Wood/ Forage MA11 Semi-primitive, Non-motorized Recreation 4% 3% 23% 24% 46% 15

16 The South Huckleberry Roadless Area was assessed during the first and second Roadless Area Review and Evaluation (RARE I and RARE II) processes completed in 1973 and 1979 respectively. In 1973, it was identified but not chosen for future wilderness study and in 1979 it was not recommended for wilderness designation. In 2006, analysis of the South Huckleberry Roadless Area by the Forest Plan Revision Team (using the process described above) resulted in the removal of approximately 639 acres from the previous inventory due to road construction and logging; 430 acres were added to the previous inventory as they met the criteria for a potential wilderness area as described in Forest Service Handbook (FSH) , Chapter 70. (South Huckleberry Wilderness Evaluation, Forest Plan Revision Team, May-June 2009) The following chart depicts the current 1988 Colville National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan direction for the land base identified in 2006 as the South Huckleberry PWA. (South Huckleberry Wilderness Evaluation, Forest Plan Revision Team, May-June 2009) Table 1--Management area percentages (rounded) for the South Huckleberry PWA - Colville National Forest MA1 Old Growth Dependent Species Habitat MA3A Recreation MA5 Scenic Timber MA7 Wood/ Forage MA8 Winter Range MA10 Semiprimitive Motorized Recreation 2% 1% 26% 33% 19% 18% Within the Sherman Pass Project area, access into the Profanity PWA occurs primarily through the Kettle Crest Trail #13 North, Jungle Hill Trail #16, and Sherman Pass Trail #82. In addition, several State and National Forest system roads open to motorized use are within close proximity of the PWA boundary and provide easy access from the planning area into the backcountry for hiking, camping, orienteering, skiing, skill development and nature exploration. Like the Profanity PWA, access into the Bald-Snow PWA occurs primarily through trails including the Kettle Crest Trail #13 South and the Snow Peak Trail #10. In addition, the PWA can also be accessed directly from State Highway 20 and the South Fork Sherman Creek Road (FR ). Both roads provide easy access from the planning area into the backcountry for hiking, camping, orienteering, skiing, skill development and nature exploration. Access into the Hoodoo PWA from within the Sherman Pass Project Area is limited to crosscountry travel originating from the Albian Hill Road (FR 2030), the Graves Mountain road system (FR and FR200450), and the Lane Creek road system (FR200325). There is no trail access into the Hoodoo PWA from the planning area, making access into the PWA for hiking, camping, orienteering, skiing, skill development and nature exploration more difficult than the Profanity and Bald-Snow PWAs. Access into the South Huckleberry PWA from within the Sherman Pass Project Area is also limited to cross-country travel originating from State Highway 20 and FR (Bangs Mountain). There is no trail access into the South Huckleberry PWA from the planning area, making access into the PWA for hiking, camping, orienteering, skiing, skill development and nature exploration more difficult than the Profanity and Bald-Snow PWAs. Inventoried Roadless Area (IRA) Small portions (similar in size to the PWA segments described above) of the Profanity (29,418 acres), Bald-Snow (24,383 acres), Hoodoo (7,103 acres), South Huckleberry (10,090 acres), and Bangs (3,733 acres) Inventoried Roadless Areas, as identified in Appendix C of the 1988 Final 16

17 Environmental Impact Statement for the Colville National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan and confirmed under the 2001 Roadless Rule, are all located within the Sherman Pass Project area. To remain consistent with the direction given in the 2001 Roadless Rule, these areas would not be available for road construction or commercial harvest if the Sherman Pass Project is implemented. Recreation Opportunity Spectrum The Recreation Opportunity Spectrum (ROS) is one of the tools that the Forest Service uses to frame the setting when describing the potential recreation experience within a given area. ROS is the basic framework for inventorying, planning and managing the recreation resource in accordance with the Forest and Rangeland Renewable Resources Planning Act of 1974 (RPA), as amended by the National Forest Management Act of 1976 (NFMA).(USDA Forest Service, ROS Users Guide) The Colville National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan (1988) directs recreation managers to provide for a broad range of ROS settings and recreational opportunities The Recreation Opportunity Spectrum provides a framework allowing administrators to manage settings and users to enjoy a variety of outdoor environments. It is not a land classification system, but a method of describing and providing a mix of recreation opportunities based on the desired setting, activity, and experience.(usda Forest Service, ROS Users Guide) The Sherman Pass Project Area has a fairly even mix of Roaded Modified (RM), Roaded Natural (RN), and Semi-Primitive Non-Motorized (SPNM) ROS classes. The SPNM ROS class is centered on the Kettle Crest and is consistent with the Profanity and Bald-Snow IRA and PWA designations. The RM and RN ROS classes are located along both sides of State Highway 20 where previous management activities have occurred. The planning area also contains three small pieces of Semi-Primitive Motorized (SPM) ROS classification. These areas are located south of State Highway 20, two east of the Kettle Crest and one west of the Kettle Crest. 17

Fossil Creek Wild & Scenic River Comprehensive River Management Plan Forest Service Proposed Action - details March 28, 2011

Fossil Creek Wild & Scenic River Comprehensive River Management Plan Forest Service Proposed Action - details March 28, 2011 Fossil Creek Wild & Scenic River Comprehensive River Management Plan Forest Service Proposed Action - details March 28, 2011 Primary Goals of the Proposed Action 1. Maintain or enhance ORVs primarily by

More information

Recreation Opportunity Spectrum for River Management v

Recreation Opportunity Spectrum for River Management v Recreation Opportunity Spectrum for Management v. 120803 Introduction The following Recreation Opportunity Spectrum (ROS) characterizations and matrices mirror the presentation in the ROS Primer and Field

More information

Please Tell Us What You Think: Candidate Sites for Recreation Business Activities

Please Tell Us What You Think: Candidate Sites for Recreation Business Activities Please Tell Us What You Think: Candidate Sites for Recreation Business Activities Background In January 2015, the Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission (Commission) approved some forms of privately

More information

Connie Rudd Superintendent, Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park

Connie Rudd Superintendent, Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park and Curecanti National Recreation Area Information Brochure #1 Wilderness and Backcountry Management Plan

More information

Sawtooth National Forest Fairfield Ranger District

Sawtooth National Forest Fairfield Ranger District United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Sawtooth National Forest Fairfield Ranger District P.O. Box 189 Fairfield, ID. 83327 208-764-3202 Fax: 208-764-3211 File Code: 1950/7700 Date: December

More information

Discussion Topics. But what does counting tell us? Current Trends in Natural Resource Management

Discussion Topics. But what does counting tell us? Current Trends in Natural Resource Management Discussion Topics What are the outputs of natural resource management How do we measure what we produce What are the outputs of resource recreation management Ed Krumpe CSS 287 Behavioral approach to management

More information

Stephens Rd. Nature Preserve

Stephens Rd. Nature Preserve Stephens Rd. Nature Preserve History Stephens Road Nature Preserve (SRNP) is a 350-acre nature preserve in Huntersville that comprises nine properties purchased between 1994 and 2008. Parcels included

More information

Trail Notes Palouse Region Hikes

Trail Notes Palouse Region Hikes Trail Notes Palouse Region Hikes Campus Recreation 875 Perimeter Drive MS 1230 Moscow, Idaho 83844-1230 Ph: 208.885.6810 Rentals: 208.885.6170 Fax: 208.885.6879 uidaho.edu/outdoorprogram 0 PALOUSE REGION

More information

A Publication of Friends of Sleeping Bear Dunes

A Publication of Friends of Sleeping Bear Dunes A Publication of Friends of Sleeping Bear Dunes 2014, Friends of Sleeping Bear Dunes, P.O. Box 545, Empire, MI 49630 www.friendsofsleepingbear.org info@friendsofsleepingbear.org Learn more about the Friends

More information

FEASIBILITY CRITERIA

FEASIBILITY CRITERIA This chapter describes the methodology and criteria used to evaluate the feasibility of developing trails throughout the study areas. Land availability, habitat sensitivity, roadway crossings and on-street

More information

Wilderness Character and Wilderness Characteristics. What s the difference? Why does it matter?

Wilderness Character and Wilderness Characteristics. What s the difference? Why does it matter? Introduction Wilderness Character and Wilderness Characteristics What s the difference? Why does it matter? The terms wilderness character and wilderness characteristics are sometimes used interchangeably

More information

Appendix A Appendix A (Project Specifications) Auk Auk / Black Diamond (Trail 44) Reroute

Appendix A Appendix A (Project Specifications) Auk Auk / Black Diamond (Trail 44) Reroute Appendix A (Project Specifications) Auk Auk / Black Diamond (Trail 44) Reroute I. Proposed Action: This project proposes to reroute approximately 1,800 feet of a 50 inch wide trail, off of private property

More information

SECTION 4. PUBLIC RECREATION

SECTION 4. PUBLIC RECREATION SECTION 4. PUBLIC RECREATION Brooker Creek Preserve is the largest remaining tract of wild land in Pinellas County and contains many species not found anywhere else in the County. As such, these wild lands

More information

Skiing and Snowshoes on Un-groomed Fernan Saddle Terrain

Skiing and Snowshoes on Un-groomed Fernan Saddle Terrain Skiing and Snowshoes on Un-groomed Fernan Saddle Terrain Three ski or snowshoe routes are available from the Fernan Saddle Parking Lot which either do not cover routes ordinarily groomed for snow machine

More information

(Short Listing) SOUTH FORK LOG CABIN, UTICA, MONTANA

(Short Listing) SOUTH FORK LOG CABIN, UTICA, MONTANA (Short Listing) SOUTH FORK LOG CABIN, UTICA, MONTANA The South Fork Log Cabin is in the heart of thousands of acres of public land of the Lewis & Clark National Forest Service. This Cabin offers unlimited

More information

Watchorn Provincial Park. Management Plan

Watchorn Provincial Park. Management Plan Watchorn Provincial Park Management Plan 2 Watchorn Provincial Park Table of Contents 1. Introduction... 3 2. Park History... 3 3. Park Attributes... 3 3.1 Natural... 4 3.2 Recreational... 4 3.3 Additional

More information

BROCHURE. APPLE HILL WOODS 118 +/- Acres Camino, California. Presented by Jim Copeland

BROCHURE. APPLE HILL WOODS 118 +/- Acres Camino, California. Presented by Jim Copeland BROCHURE APPLE HILL WOODS 118 +/- Acres Camino, California Presented by Jim Copeland 1 The Property This 118 acre is a rare gem in the Sierra Nevada foothills. Covered with lush forestland and scattered

More information

Lena Beach Recreation Area Renovation. Dear National Forest User:

Lena Beach Recreation Area Renovation. Dear National Forest User: United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Alaska Region Tongass National Forest Juneau Ranger District 8510 Mendenhall Loop Juneau, AK 99801 Phone: (907) 586-8800 Fax: (907) 586-8808 File

More information

BRYCE CANYON COUNTRY Boulder Mountain Scenic backways itinerary

BRYCE CANYON COUNTRY Boulder Mountain Scenic backways itinerary BRYCE CANYON COUNTRY Boulder Mountain Scenic backways itinerary Boulder Mountain Area The high plateaus of the Aquarius Plateau (Boulder Mountain), are heavily forested and covered in countless winding

More information

SPECTACLE LAKE PROVINCIAL PARK PURPOSE STATEMENT AND ZONING PLAN

SPECTACLE LAKE PROVINCIAL PARK PURPOSE STATEMENT AND ZONING PLAN SPECTACLE LAKE PROVINCIAL PARK PURPOSE STATEMENT AND ZONING PLAN August 2003 1 SPECTACLE LAKE PROVINCIAL PARK Purpose Statement and Zoning Plan Primary Role The primary role of Spectacle Lake Park is to

More information

USDA United States ~ Department of A riculture

USDA United States ~ Department of A riculture USDA United States ~ Department of A riculture Forest Service Lassen National Forest Pacific Ranger District 2550 Riverside Drive Susanville, CA 96130-4774 File Code: 1950 Date: January 14, 2015 Dear hlterested

More information

The striking colours of the setting sun reflecting on the waters is how Crimson Lake received its name. Crimson Lake Provincial Park is a meeting

The striking colours of the setting sun reflecting on the waters is how Crimson Lake received its name. Crimson Lake Provincial Park is a meeting The striking colours of the setting sun reflecting on the waters is how Crimson Lake received its name. Crimson Lake Provincial Park is a meeting place of foothills forests in the west, bog and muskeg

More information

ROYAL GORGE PARK and RECREATION AREA. A Feat of Natural and Man-Made Engineering

ROYAL GORGE PARK and RECREATION AREA. A Feat of Natural and Man-Made Engineering ROYAL GORGE PARK and RECREATION AREA A Feat of Natural and Man-Made Engineering As Growth Resumed in the 1870 s Town Leaders Began to Envision a Tourist Industry. The Arkansas River Canyon was advertised

More information

Kitimat. Pacific Inland Coast. Hiking Guide Kitimat, British Columbia, Canada

Kitimat. Pacific Inland Coast. Hiking Guide Kitimat, British Columbia, Canada Kitimat Pacific Inland Coast Hiking Guide Kitimat, British Columbia, Canada 2010-2011 Sites and Trails Emergency Call 911 Police - Fire - Medical 2 Welcome to Kitimat This information was produced to assist

More information

Procedure for the Use of Power-Driven Mobility Devices on Mass Audubon Sanctuaries 1 September 17, 2012

Procedure for the Use of Power-Driven Mobility Devices on Mass Audubon Sanctuaries 1 September 17, 2012 Procedure for the Use of Power-Driven Mobility Devices on Mass Audubon Sanctuaries 1 September 17, 2012 Background As part of Mass Audubon s mission to preserve the nature of Massachusetts for people and

More information

Pembina Valley Provincial Park. Draft Management Plan

Pembina Valley Provincial Park. Draft Management Plan Pembina Valley Provincial Park Draft Management Plan 2 Pembina Valley Provincial Park Table of Contents 1. Introduction... 3 2. Park History... 3 3. Park Attributes... 3 3.1 Natural... 3 3.2 Recreational...

More information

Finn Creek Park. Management Direction Statement Amendment

Finn Creek Park. Management Direction Statement Amendment Finn Creek Park Management Direction Statement Amendment November 2013 Management Direction Statement Amendment Approved by: Jeff Leahy Regional Director, Thompson Cariboo BC Parks November 12, 2013 Date

More information

TOURISM & PUBLIC SERVICES RURAL SIGNAGE POLICY

TOURISM & PUBLIC SERVICES RURAL SIGNAGE POLICY Policy and Procedures Subject Title: Tourism and Public Services Rural Signage Policy Corporate Policy (Approved by Council): X Policy Ref. No.: ROADS-01-07 Administrative Policy (Approved by CAO): By-Law

More information

DOYLE SPRINGS PLANNING UNIT Kern-Tule River Watershed

DOYLE SPRINGS PLANNING UNIT Kern-Tule River Watershed Existing Conditions & Uses Overview Consists of a mostly forested parcel with small hydropower developments and part of a private recreation cabin development, along with two small transmission line corridor

More information

School Group Permits for Kananaskis Country Parks and Protected Areas-Memo

School Group Permits for Kananaskis Country Parks and Protected Areas-Memo Parks and Protected Areas School Group Permits for Parks and Protected Areas-Memo From: Date: January 4, 2005 Alberta Parks and Protected Areas Telephone: (403) 678-5508 To: All Alberta School Boards and

More information

CAMPSITE 411. Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta, Inc.

CAMPSITE 411. Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta, Inc. CAMPSITE 411 Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta, Inc. What is provided for us at each campsite/cabin? Although each living unit (tents or cabins) is unique, you can expect to find certain unit equipment in

More information

Digital Terrain Analysis of Archer Mountain

Digital Terrain Analysis of Archer Mountain Digital Terrain Analysis of Archer Mountain Identifying a potential new recreational trail Photo: Justin Bush GEOG 593 - Duh Marcus Tobey Justin Bush Project Overview Background Project Area Overview Questions

More information

Auburn Trail / Ontario Pathways Trail Connector Feasibility Study Public Information Meeting Wednesday, August 22, 2012

Auburn Trail / Ontario Pathways Trail Connector Feasibility Study Public Information Meeting Wednesday, August 22, 2012 Auburn Trail / Ontario Pathways Trail Connector Feasibility Study Public Information Meeting Wednesday, August 22, 2012 Purpose of Feasibility Study Purpose Evaluate the feasibility of constructing a multiuse

More information

Prince Edward Island National Park of Canada

Prince Edward Island National Park of Canada Prince Edward Island National Park of Canada Things you should know regarding Cavendish and Stanhope Campgrounds Important Notices General Camping Information Fees If There is No Vacancy Require Additional

More information

Policy. Huts, Cabins and Lodges in BC Provincial Parks

Policy. Huts, Cabins and Lodges in BC Provincial Parks Policy Huts, Cabins and Lodges in BC Provincial Parks Federation of Mountain Clubs of BC Version 1.3 Published August 2, 2015 INTRODUCTION The Federation of Mountain Clubs of BC (FMCBC) promotes self-propelled

More information

Eagle Rock Loop Ouachita National Forest Page 1 of 8

Eagle Rock Loop Ouachita National Forest Page 1 of 8 EAGLE ROCK LOOP Eagle Rock Loop Ouachita National Forest Page 1 of 8 Hiking: Biking: Equestrian: Trail Highlights: This trail offers the longest loop trail in Arkansas. A combination of the Little Missouri,

More information

ROUTE ANALYSIS PROCESS

ROUTE ANALYSIS PROCESS ROUTE ANALYSIS PROCESS Progress to Date: 1. Recorded and labeled all routes received from PAT Meetings. 2. Determined opportunity, avoidance and exclusion areas crossed by PAT proposed routes. 3. Routes

More information

Wallace Lake Provincial Park. Management Plan

Wallace Lake Provincial Park. Management Plan Wallace Lake Provincial Park Management Plan 2 Wallace Lake Provincial Park Table of Contents 1. Introduction... 3 2. Park History... 3 3. Park Attributes... 4 3.1 Natural... 4 3.2 Recreational... 4 4.

More information

BRIAN HEAD AREA TRAILS MASTER PLAN. January 2015

BRIAN HEAD AREA TRAILS MASTER PLAN. January 2015 BRIAN HEAD AREA TRAILS MASTER PLAN January 2015.............. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS & SIGNATURES Thanks to Brian Head Town s Trails Master Plan Development Committee who includes the key partners within the

More information

MORGAN CREEK GREENWAY Final Report APPENDICES

MORGAN CREEK GREENWAY Final Report APPENDICES APPENDICES MORGAN CREEK GREENWAY Appendix A Photos of Existing Conditions in Trail Corridor Photos of existing conditions Main trail corridor - February 2009 Photos of existing conditions south bank Morgan

More information

Route #1) Mt. of the Holy Cross - North Ridge

Route #1) Mt. of the Holy Cross - North Ridge Climbing 14ers can be very dangerous, please read the Mountaineering Safety Page and make sure you have a map+compass and can use them effectively, without the help of electronic devices. Route #1) Mt.

More information

Lewis River Recreation Sites

Lewis River Recreation Sites Lewis River Recreation Sites N 0 miles 2 4 8 Parking Fees Hours Visitors entering day-use sites with vehicles must pay applicable fees during peak recreation season. * Pass holders, please check in with

More information

Piestewa Peak/Dreamy Draw Trail Guide

Piestewa Peak/Dreamy Draw Trail Guide Piestewa Peak/Dreamy Draw Trail Guide Trail #1A - Perl Charles Memorial Trail Length: 4.8 miles Elevation: 2,200 ft. - 1,340 ft. Difficulty: Moderate to difficult The Perl Charles trailhead is located

More information

3.0 EXISTING PARK & RECREATION SPACE

3.0 EXISTING PARK & RECREATION SPACE 3.0 EXISTING PARK & RECREATION SPACE TOWN PARK & RECREATION SPACE An inventory of current parks and recreation area in the Town of Cedarburg is shown in Table 3. These areas total roughly 381.89 acres.

More information

Bradshaw Trails Series

Bradshaw Trails Series Bradshaw Trails Series Curtis James Troop 7014 Curtis.James@erau.edu My Motto: Never get lost! Hiking Rules Bradshaw Hiking Patch Series Hiking Tools Hiking Rules Hiking Merit Badge* Take five 10-mile

More information

Stuart River Provincial Park Purpose Statement and Zoning Plan

Stuart River Provincial Park Purpose Statement and Zoning Plan Stuart River Provincial Park Purpose Statement and Zoning Plan Stuart River Provincial Park protects three-quarters of the 110 kilometer long Stuart River corridor between Stuart Lake and the Nechako River.

More information

Visitors Experiences and Preferences at Lost Lake in Clatsop State Forest, Oregon

Visitors Experiences and Preferences at Lost Lake in Clatsop State Forest, Oregon Visitors Experiences and Preferences at Lost Lake in Clatsop State Forest, Oregon Final Report Mark D. Needham, Ph.D. Assistant Professor Recreation Resource Management Program Department of Forest Resources

More information

HUNTING PROPERTIES Bearpaw Trail Hand constructed with reclaimed timbers from a historic Stagestop.

HUNTING PROPERTIES Bearpaw Trail Hand constructed with reclaimed timbers from a historic Stagestop. $4,500,000 #139289 428.0 AC $2,500,000 #138964 113.5 AC $24,9500,000 #137591 9,000.0 AC 8855 Bearpaw Trail Includes a 3 acre lake and borders Routt National Forest. 8925 Bearpaw Trail Hand constructed

More information

CLE ELUM RANGER DISTRICT

CLE ELUM RANGER DISTRICT CLE ELUM RANGER DISTRICT The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination in its programs on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age, disability, political

More information

Banff National Park of Canada

Banff National Park of Canada Banff National Park of Canada Things you should know regarding Tunnel Mountain Village I and Tunnel Mountain Village II Campgrounds Updated July 13, 2012 Important Notices Important Notices General Campground

More information

Flow Stand Up Paddle Board Parkway Plan Analysis

Flow Stand Up Paddle Board Parkway Plan Analysis Regional Parks Department Jeffrey R. Leatherman, Director County of Sacramento Divisions Administration Golf Leisure Services Maintenance Rangers Therapeutic Recreation Services Flow Stand Up Paddle Board

More information

APPENDIX A: Survey Instruments

APPENDIX A: Survey Instruments Three different surveys were conducted during the research phase of the NCHA Trails Study. One questionnaire was designed for elected officials and user groups (general public). The other two questionnaires

More information

Business Item No

Business Item No Metropolitan Parks and Open Space Commission Meeting date: February 6, 2018 For the Community Development Committee meeting of February 20, 2018 For the Metropolitan Council meeting of February 28, 2018

More information

CRAZY HORSE TRAIL GUIDE

CRAZY HORSE TRAIL GUIDE CRAZY HORSE TRAIL GUIDE Abridged Version: July 2016 This is a short form of our interpretive trail guide for the Crazy Horse Trail. The full version of the guide has a more detailed description of the

More information

Outdoor Developed Areas

Outdoor Developed Areas The United States Access Board is an independent federal agency that promotes equality for people with disabilities through leadership in accessible design and the development of accessibility guidelines

More information

Summary of Recreation Sites Development Name:

Summary of Recreation Sites Development Name: Development Name: Eau Pleine Site Number: 1 Owner: WVIC Eau Pleine Tailwater Boat Launch Lanes 1 Concrete plank landing, access to Eau Pleine tailwater & Lake DuBay. (45 planks long, 62.5') Picnic Tables

More information

Oregon Section B - Page m

Oregon Section B - Page m Oregon Section B - Page 1 5 35000m 5 36000m 5 37000m 5 38000m 46 57000m 46 58000m Hwy5B - Interstate Highway 5 - mi 1716.4-4271 ft RD1717 - PCT departs paved Old Highway 99 - mi 1716.8-4357 ft PL1717 -

More information

Gold Coast. Rapid Transit. Chapter twelve Social impact. Chapter content

Gold Coast. Rapid Transit. Chapter twelve Social impact. Chapter content Gold Coast Rapid Transit Chapter twelve Social impact Chapter content Social impact assessment process...235 Existing community profile...237 Consultation...238 Social impacts and mitigation strategies...239

More information

Afton State Park Management Plan Amendment

Afton State Park Management Plan Amendment This document is made available electronically by the Minnesota Legislative Reference Library as part of an ongoing digital archiving project. http://www.leg.state.mn.us/lrl/lrl.asp Afton State Park Management

More information

WARNING Due to Extensive Beetle Kill Trees, Trails are Subject to Closure or Rerouting. Please be Advised and Pay attention to On Ground Signage.

WARNING Due to Extensive Beetle Kill Trees, Trails are Subject to Closure or Rerouting. Please be Advised and Pay attention to On Ground Signage. WARNING Due to Extensive Beetle Kill Trees, Trails are Subject to Closure or Rerouting. Please be Advised and Pay attention to On Ground Signage. WYOMING RANGE WESTERN WYOMING The Wyoming Range trail system

More information

Minnesota River Valley Area Survey Summary Report

Minnesota River Valley Area Survey Summary Report Minnesota River Valley Area Survey Summary Report Report prepared by: Minnesota Department of Natural Resources Office of Management and Budget Services May 2002 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS A number of organizations

More information

PASSPORT. Discovering the Trails of Webster, NY

PASSPORT. Discovering the Trails of Webster, NY PASSPORT to family wellness Discovering the Trails of Webster, NY Join the Friends of Webster Trails, Webster Health and Education Network, The Town of Webster and Wegmans to get moving more and enjoy

More information

Dixon Trail Construction - From the Top of the Mountain 2016 Interim Report Friends of Cheyenne Mountain State Park September 2 nd, 2016

Dixon Trail Construction - From the Top of the Mountain 2016 Interim Report Friends of Cheyenne Mountain State Park September 2 nd, 2016 - Dixon Trail Construction - From the Top of the Mountain 2016 Interim Report Friends of Cheyenne Mountain State Park September 2 nd, 2016 Prepared by: Andy Riter, Program Coordinator, and Joe Lavorini,

More information

Double Bar Z Ranch 8,690 ± California. Mariposa County Exclusive Agents Allen Alsobrook Jim Watson. Sierra Foothills. La Grange

Double Bar Z Ranch 8,690 ± California. Mariposa County Exclusive Agents Allen Alsobrook Jim Watson. Sierra Foothills. La Grange Double Bar Z Ranch 8,690 ± California. Mariposa County Exclusive Agents Allen Alsobrook Jim Watson Sierra Foothills. La Grange The Double Bar Z Ranch is a spectacular working cattle ranch. It has been

More information

Hiking Las Vegas.com

Hiking Las Vegas.com Hike: Mt. Wilson via First Creek Canyon route Trailhead: First Creek marked Distance: 10 miles up and back Elevation gain: 3,400 feet Elevation of Peak: 7,070 feet Time: 7 to 9 hours (up and back) Difficulty:

More information

BRACEVILLE NATURE PRESERVE Introductions History Present Conditions Future Development Plans Implementation Strategies Statistics

BRACEVILLE NATURE PRESERVE Introductions History Present Conditions Future Development Plans Implementation Strategies Statistics BRACEVILLE NATURE PRESERVE Introductions History Present Conditions Future Development Plans Implementation Strategies Statistics Introduction Braceville Nature Preserve is one of MetroParks largest preserves.

More information

CAMPER CHARACTERISTICS DIFFER AT PUBLIC AND COMMERCIAL CAMPGROUNDS IN NEW ENGLAND

CAMPER CHARACTERISTICS DIFFER AT PUBLIC AND COMMERCIAL CAMPGROUNDS IN NEW ENGLAND CAMPER CHARACTERISTICS DIFFER AT PUBLIC AND COMMERCIAL CAMPGROUNDS IN NEW ENGLAND Ahact. Early findings from a 5-year panel survey of New England campers' changing leisure habits are reported. A significant

More information

Airport Planning Area

Airport Planning Area PLANNING AREA POLICIES l AIRPORT Airport Planning Area LOCATION AND CONTEXT The Airport Planning Area ( Airport area ) is a key part of Boise s economy and transportation network; it features a multi-purpose

More information

EXISTING CONDITIONS ON COLORADO S FOURTEENERS NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGER SURVEY RESULTS

EXISTING CONDITIONS ON COLORADO S FOURTEENERS NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGER SURVEY RESULTS EXISTING CONDITIONS ON COLORADO S FOURTEENERS NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGER SURVEY RESULTS A Little Background January 15, 2004 - Informal Gathering of Wilderness Managers. Survey Monkey survey developed with

More information

River Ridge Campgrounds Cabin and RV sites

River Ridge Campgrounds Cabin and RV sites River Ridge Campgrounds Cabin and RV sites Hooray!!! The River Ridge Campground at Sprewell Bluff Park is officially open for overnight guests! There are primitive cabins and RV sites for anyone who would

More information

HIKING/BIKING IN MERRITT AREA

HIKING/BIKING IN MERRITT AREA HIKING/BIKING IN MERRITT AREA Coquihalla Lakes: Just inside the southern boundary of BC Park's Coquihalla Summit Park, a nice little twin lakes paddle with a private campground & lodge is the Coquihalla

More information

FILE: /PERM EFFECTIVE DATE: May 16, 2014 AMENDMENT:

FILE: /PERM EFFECTIVE DATE: May 16, 2014 AMENDMENT: APPROVED AMENDMENTS: Effective Date Briefing Note /Approval Summary of Changes: FILE: 11000-00/PERM EFFECTIVE DATE: May 16, 2014 AMENDMENT: Table of Contents 1. POLICY APPLICATION... 1 2. PRINCIPLES AND

More information

Lake Red Rock Volunteer Service Opportunities Season

Lake Red Rock Volunteer Service Opportunities Season Lake Red Rock Volunteer Service Opportunities - 2015 Season A detailed description of volunteer duties relating to each position is available upon request. Requirements of all positions: 1. Available to

More information

AUGUST 2015 BRECKENRIDGE SKI RESORT MULTI-SEASON RECREATION PROJECTS FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT DRAFT RECORD OF DECISION

AUGUST 2015 BRECKENRIDGE SKI RESORT MULTI-SEASON RECREATION PROJECTS FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT DRAFT RECORD OF DECISION BRECKENRIDGE SKI RESORT MULTI-SEASON RECREATION PROJECTS FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT DRAFT RECORD OF DECISION AUGUST 2015 USDA Forest Service White River National Forest Dillon Ranger District

More information

Listing of Campsites on the Manigotagan River

Listing of Campsites on the Manigotagan River Listing of Campsites on the Manigotagan River This document lists and describes the campsites along the Manigotagan River between Highway #314 and the government dock in the community of Manigotagan. The

More information

Lava Mountain Trail Distance: Elevation Range: Trail Type: Difficulty: Season: Driving Distance: Driving Time: USGS Maps: Pros Cons

Lava Mountain Trail Distance: Elevation Range: Trail Type: Difficulty: Season: Driving Distance: Driving Time: USGS Maps: Pros Cons Lava Mountain Trail Distance: 13.4 miles (including the side trip to North Star Lake) Elevation Range: 5900'-8330' Trail Type: singletrack Difficulty: moderate Season: late June-October Driving Distance:

More information

ABOUT THE PARKS NANTAHALA NATIONAL FOREST MOUNTAINS NATIONAL PARK CHEROKEE NATIONAL FOREST PISGAH NATIONAL FOREST GREAT SMOKY HIKING TRAILS

ABOUT THE PARKS NANTAHALA NATIONAL FOREST MOUNTAINS NATIONAL PARK CHEROKEE NATIONAL FOREST PISGAH NATIONAL FOREST GREAT SMOKY HIKING TRAILS ABOUT THE PARKS GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS NATIONAL PARK NANTAHALA NATIONAL FOREST CHEROKEE NATIONAL FOREST PISGAH NATIONAL FOREST GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS NATIONAL PARK Straddling the border between North Carolina

More information

A BOAT RAMP TO NOWHERE

A BOAT RAMP TO NOWHERE A BOAT RAMP TO NOWHERE A PROPOSAL FOR ACCESS TO HARVIE PASSAGE A Presentation to the City of Calgary December 2017 Presented by: Peter Crowe-Swords Bow River Trout Foundation Background: The Bow River

More information

NORTH GEORGIA MOUNTAINS, USA. Knights Mill Farm

NORTH GEORGIA MOUNTAINS, USA. Knights Mill Farm NORTH GEORGIA MOUNTAINS, USA Knights Mill Farm Knights Mill Farm NORTH GEORGIA MOUNTAINS, USA Introduction: This historically significant property is perfect for development into a family compound with

More information

Section II. Planning & Public Process Planning for the Baker/Carver Regional Trail began in 2010 as a City of Minnetrista initiative.

Section II. Planning & Public Process Planning for the Baker/Carver Regional Trail began in 2010 as a City of Minnetrista initiative. Section II Planning & Public Process Planning for the began in 2010 as a City of initiative. city staff began discussions with the Park District on the possibility of a north/south regional trail connection

More information

THRESHOLD GUIDELINES FOR AVALANCHE SAFETY MEASURES

THRESHOLD GUIDELINES FOR AVALANCHE SAFETY MEASURES BRITISH COLUMBIA MINISTRY OF TRANSPORTATION & INFRASTRUCTURE AVALANCHE & WEATHER PROGRAMS THRESHOLD GUIDELINES FOR AVALANCHE SAFETY MEASURES British Columbia Ministry of Transportation & Infrastructure

More information

Interstate 90 and Mercer Island Mobility Study APRIL Commissioned by. Prepared by

Interstate 90 and Mercer Island Mobility Study APRIL Commissioned by. Prepared by Interstate 90 and Mercer Island Mobility Study APRIL 2017 Commissioned by Prepared by Interstate 90 and Mercer Island Mobility Study Commissioned by: Sound Transit Prepared by: April 2017 Contents Section

More information

W E L C OM E TO BAC K Y AR D N AT U R E C E N TER S SITE R E SOURCE PAC K E T S!

W E L C OM E TO BAC K Y AR D N AT U R E C E N TER S SITE R E SOURCE PAC K E T S! LITTLE HOUSE OF GLENCOE Last updated September 7, 2011 W E L C OM E TO BAC K Y AR D N AT U R E C E N TER S SITE R E SOURCE PAC K E T S! BackYard Nature Center (BYNC) has selected and described six nature

More information

Treaty Oaks Ranch 323+/- Acres Hood County, Texas $1,776,500

Treaty Oaks Ranch 323+/- Acres Hood County, Texas $1,776,500 Bret Polk Mobile: (254) 965-0349 Office: (214) 361-9191 Treaty Oaks Ranch 323+/- Acres Hood County, Texas $1,776,500 LOCATION: The ranch is located in a desirable area 10+/- miles south of Granbury, Texas,

More information

Southeastern Adirondack Forest Preserve Visitor Study

Southeastern Adirondack Forest Preserve Visitor Study Southeastern Adirondack Forest Preserve Visitor Study Chad P. Dawson, Jennifer Baker, Lindsey Barker, and Corey Williams SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry 320 Bray Hall One Forestry Drive

More information

Whychus-Deschutes Wilderness Proposal

Whychus-Deschutes Wilderness Proposal Whychus-Deschutes Wilderness Proposal Imagine a place where two pristine waterways meet in a deep, rugged canyon. Where cool, clear water rushes from ancient springs to provide the lifeblood for wildlife

More information

Isle Royale Info Section 5: Campgrounds

Isle Royale Info Section 5: Campgrounds Isle Royale Info Section 5: Campgrounds Overview: All of the campgrounds are very well marked and the sites have shelters and or tent pads. Shelters are typically available at campgrounds on Lake Superior,

More information

White Mountain National Forest. Appendix E Wilderness Management Plan

White Mountain National Forest. Appendix E Wilderness Management Plan White Mountain National Forest Appendix E Wilderness Management Plan Contents 1.0 Introduction... 3 2.0 Zoning... 4 2.1 Zone Descriptions... 5 3.0 Indicators and Standards... 10 3.1 Wilderness Indicators...

More information

2017 Amendment - Public Access and Recreation Management Plan And Road Management Plan CLHCC Review Draft

2017 Amendment - Public Access and Recreation Management Plan And Road Management Plan CLHCC Review Draft Introduction The Connecticut Lakes Headwaters Working Forest Recreation Program, managed by the Division of Parks and Recreation, works closely with local organizations and businesses and the private landowner,

More information

Bayview Escarpment. Interim Management Statement

Bayview Escarpment. Interim Management Statement Bayview Escarpment Interim Management Statement Bayview Escarpment Provincial Nature Reserve Interim Management Statement January 15, 1995 REGIONAL DIRECTOR'S APPROVAL STATEMENT This Interim Management

More information

JERICHO MOUNTAIN STATE PARK Riding Area Master Trail Development Plan December 1, 2006

JERICHO MOUNTAIN STATE PARK Riding Area Master Trail Development Plan December 1, 2006 JERICHO MOUNTAIN STATE PARK Riding Area Master Trail Development Plan December 1, 2006 Prepared For: NH Division of Parks and Recreation Bureau of Trails 172 Pembroke Road Concord, NH 03302 Prepared By:

More information

Gravel and Rock Extraction Highway Maintenance, Recapitalization and Twinning

Gravel and Rock Extraction Highway Maintenance, Recapitalization and Twinning Gravel and Rock Extraction Highway Maintenance, Recapitalization and Twinning Backgrounder: Mountain National Parks A Need for Change Existing supplies of aggregate (sand and gravel) for highway maintenance,

More information

ARTICLE 7 MOBILE HOME AND RECREATIONAL VEHICLE PARKS AND CAMPGROUNDS

ARTICLE 7 MOBILE HOME AND RECREATIONAL VEHICLE PARKS AND CAMPGROUNDS ARTICLE 7 MOBILE HOME AND RECREATIONAL VEHICLE PARKS AND CAMPGROUNDS Section 701. APPLICABILITY Where a municipality has no subdivision or land development ordinance the provisions of this article shall

More information

Triangle C Ranch Highway 26, Dubois, Wyoming 82513

Triangle C Ranch Highway 26, Dubois, Wyoming 82513 Triangle C Ranch 3737 Highway 26, Dubois, Wyoming 82513 Triangle C Ranch 3737 Highway 26, Dubois, WY 82513 Nestled between Jackson Hole and DuBois, Wyoming, Triangle C Ranch rests in an idyllic mountain

More information

White Mountain Wilderness Trails

White Mountain Wilderness Trails The area in which these hikes are located is rugged high mountain country along the Mogollon Rim. This famous eastwest escarpment separates Arizona's high plateau from the basin and range below. These

More information

Salmo Ski Hill 2015 Operating Season SVTS Annual Work Plan

Salmo Ski Hill 2015 Operating Season SVTS Annual Work Plan Salmo Ski Hill 2015 Operating Season SVTS Annual Work Plan 2014 Review Our goal for 2014 had been to complete construction of a 2.5km loop trail (Figure 1) with scouting and possibly layout for the remainder

More information

Payson City Four Bay Management Plan

Payson City Four Bay Management Plan Payson City Four Bay Management Plan January 2008 Bear West 1584 South 500 West Suite 202 Woods Cross, UT 84010 Bear West Consultants January 2008 Four Bay Management Plan City of Payson, Utah 2008 Development

More information

California Section C - Page 1

California Section C - Page 1 - Page 1 5 2m 5 2m 5 0m 5 3m 37 0m These maps are provided as a free service to PCT hikers. I believe the information is accurate but they may contain errors. The maps are distributed in the hope that

More information

MAJESTIC HIGHLANDS OF ASHEVILLE

MAJESTIC HIGHLANDS OF ASHEVILLE MAJESTIC HIGHLANDS OF ASHEVILLE Asheville s Premier, High-Elevation, Mountain-Top Property 795 ± Acres Buncombe County Western North Carolina SEALED BID AUCTION Followed by a live auction on June 21st

More information

Excelsior Pass Avalanche Accident January 1, 2008

Excelsior Pass Avalanche Accident January 1, 2008 Excelsior Pass Avalanche Accident January 1, 2008 Accident Summary Time: 1 January 2008, approximately 13:00 hrs Location: Near Excelsior Pass to east of Church Mt, Northern Washington Cascades WA Activity:

More information