including the Sherman Pass Scenic Byway. 1

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "including the Sherman Pass Scenic Byway. 1"

Transcription

1 This document is submitted as part of the analysis file for the Sherman Pass Project Environmental Assessment. Knowledge of the planning area was developed through five half-day and two full-day field tours and discussions with the West Zone s Outdoor Recreation Planner, Forest Landscape Architect, and West Zone Silviculturist. Management Framework The primary management authorities for recreation and related resources are the Term Permit Act of 1915 (38 Stat. 1101, as amended; 16 USC 497), the Multiple Use Sustained-Yield Act of June 12, 1960 (74 Stat. 215, as amended; 16 USC ), the 1964 Wilderness Act (16 USC ), and the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (Pub. L ; 80 Stat. 915; 16 USC 470 et seq.). General management direction for recreation is supplied by the 1988 Colville National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan Forestwide Standards and Guidelines on pages 4-35 through Direction specific to management areas within the planning area can be found on pages 4-69 to 4-72 (MA 1), 4-77 to 4-79 (MA 3A), 4-89 to 4-91 (MA4), 4-93 to 4-96 (MA 5), 4-97 to (MA 6), to (MA7), to (MA 8), to (MA 10) and to (MA 11). Affected Environment/Existing Condition The Sherman Pass Project area consists of National Forest System lands located along the eastern and western slopes of the Kettle Crest both north and south of State Highway 20. The northern boundary is generally described by a line ranging from one to three miles north of State Highway 20 that extends from the Forest s eastern boundary with the Sherman Creek State Wildlife Recreation Area west towards Graves Mountain and along the hydrologic divide between Deadman Creek and Sherman Creek to the top of the Kettle Crest, then turning south through Jungle Hill and Columbia Mountain back to State Highway 20. The southern boundary is generally described by a line ranging from one to three miles south of State Highway 20 that extends from the Forest s eastern boundary with the Sherman Creek State Wildlife Recreation Area west along the hydrologic divide between Sherman Creek and the Columbia River towards Bangs Mountain, then west towards the hydrologic divide between the South Fork Sherman Creek and Sherman Creek to Sherman Peak, heading south along the Kettle Crest to Snow Peak, then turning west along the hydrologic divide between South Fork O Brien Creek and North Fork O Brien Creek to Murphy Hill, then Southwest to within about ½ mile of Quartz Mountain and then turning northwest towards the Forest s western boundary at the corner of sections 21, 27, and 28. The area View of the western portion of the planning area including the Sherman Pass Scenic Byway. Eastern view of the planning area from the Kettle Crest. 1

2 consists of National Forest Lands that exist within the North Fork O Brien Creek and Sherman Creek watersheds. Elevations range from approximately 2,080 feet along Sherman Creek on the far eastern boundary of the project area to over 7,000 feet along the high points of the Kettle Crest. A system of Forest roads and trails provides visitors with easy access throughout the planning area. State Highway 20, the Sherman Pass Scenic Byway, offers travelers the best panoramic views of the planning area. Likewise, the Kettle Crest National Recreation Trail, part of the Pacific Northwest National Scenic Trail Corridor, offers excellent views of the planning area both north and south of State Highway 20. In general, the area consists of lightly to densely forested north and east slopes with natural openings along many of the south and west slopes and ridgelines. Areas adjacent to State Highway 20 show little signs of recent management while some areas adjacent to the non-paved road system have been harvested in the past, providing management created openings and thinned timber stands. Both the natural and management created openings are used for recreational parking and overnight camping. The heaviest recreational use in the planning area occurs primarily during the summer and fall, although a considerable amount of winter recreation occurs on the designated trails within the planning area. Types of recreation use within the planning area includes: developed and dispersed camping, visiting developed scenic overlooks and historic sites, scenic driving, hiking, mountain biking, pack and saddle stock use, hunting, berry picking, firewood gathering, fishing, picnicking, Nordic skiing, backcountry skiing, snowshoeing, snowmobiling, and Off Highway Vehicle (OHV) use. Developed Recreation Several developed recreation sites are located within the Sherman Pass Project area including: two campgrounds, a scenic overlook, three interpretive/heritage sites with picnic area facilities, three trailheads (two with horse camping facilities), and two designated sno-parks. Campgrounds Canyon Creek Campground is a small fee campground located just south of State Highway 20 off Forest Road This moderately used, development scale three (Moderate Site Modification/Investment) campground consists of twelve campsites, two large parking areas and two vault toilets. The campground also accesses a one mile scenic trail (Canyon Creek Trail #93) along Sherman Creek that connects with the Log Flume Heritage Site. The area is very popular for huckleberry picking and is used heavily on summer weekends. Site amenities (tables, grills, signs, etc.) are in generally good condition with little deferred maintenance. Entrance to Sherman Overlook Campground. Typical Campsite at Canyon Creek Campground. 2

3 Sherman Overlook Campground is a small fee campground located just north of State Highway 20, approximately one mile east of Sherman Pass. This lightly used high elevation campground provides the only source of potable water along the Sherman Pass Scenic Byway between Kettle Falls and Republic. The campground meets development scale three (Moderate Site Modification/Investment) classification guidelines and contains nine campsites, a single vault toilet, a handpump water system, and the entrance to Sherman Tie Trail #96. Site amenities (table, grills, signs, etc.) are in generally good condition with little deferred maintenance. The entrance to the campground is shared with Sherman Overlook, which lies just east of the Campground. Vegetation within both campgrounds is diverse; however, much of the overstory is comprised of mature lodgepole pine and larch. The lodgepole has been recently infected with the mountain pine beetle and heavy mortality has already occurred in Sherman Overlook Campground and is expected to occur over the next 3-5 years in Canyon Creek Campground. Extensive hazard tree removal has been occurring at the campground since Both campgrounds are in need of vegetation plans that would define the preferred mix of tree species, spacing, and removal timeline for the existing overstory vegetation. Implementation of approved vegetation plans should enhance the long-term resiliency of the sites to future mortality, ensure adequate screening between sites, encourage proper placement of shade trees and, in general, improve the quality of each campground s recreation setting. Scenic Overlook Sherman Pass Scenic Overlook is a fully wheelchair accessible development scale four (Heavy Site Modification/ High Investment) recreation site. The site was reconstructed in 2008 as part of the Sherman Pass Scenic Byway improvement project and has well-maintained amenities with little deferred maintenance. The site offers three picnic sites, a double unit outhouse, two interpretive kiosks, and a 0.4 mile paved interpretive trail. Vegetation within the site is diverse; however, much of the overstory is comprised of mature lodgepole pine and larch. The lodgepole has been recently infected with the mountain pine beetle and heavy mortality has already occurred at the site. Extensive hazard tree removal has been occurring at the overlook since The Overlook is in need of a vegetation plan that would define the preferred mix of tree species, spacing, and removal timeline for the remaining overstory vegetation. Implementation of an approved vegetation plan should enhance the long-term resiliency of the site to future mortality, ensure adequate screening between the site and the road, encourage proper viewshed maintenance and improve the quality of the recreation setting. Accessible trail with interpretive kiosk and down lodgepole pine caused by pine beetle mortality. Southwest view from entrance to overlook taken in early June. 3

4 Interpretive/Heritage Sites The Log Flume Heritage Site is a primary stop along the Sherman Pass Scenic Byway. The site is wheelchair accessible and designed/built to development scale four (Heavy Site Modification/High Investment) guidelines. The site offers several picnic sites, large paved parking areas, a double unit outhouse, life size interpretive displays and a 0.7 mile paved interpretive trail. This site also acts as a secondary trailhead to the wheelchair accessible, paved Canyon Creek Trail #93 that connects with Canyon Creek Campground. The site is in generally good condition. However, the site does require new interpretive signs and the completion of an interpretive kiosk associated with the Scenic Byway Improvement Project completed in Camp Growden is also a primary stop along the Sherman Pass Scenic Byway. This development scale four (Heavy Site Modification/High Investment) interpretive site offers a short interpretive trail, a couple of picnic sites, a double unit outhouse, and a couple of historic structures (changing house and water fountain) built by the Civilian Conservation Corps. This site was partially reconstructed in and is also in need of new interpretive signs and the installation of an interpretive kiosk planned during the Scenic Byway Improvement Project. The Sherman Pass Scenic Byway interpretive stop sits north of State Highway 20 at the top of Sherman Pass. This development scale three (Moderate Site Modification/Moderate Investment) interpretive pullout consists of a large parking area and an interpretive kiosk. The site is surrounded by rock and the highway, with little vegetation. The site is in good condition but could use additional surfacing material along the seam of the graveled parking area and paved highway where storm run-off has caused erosion. Sherman Pass Scenic Byway interpretive kiosk. Winter view of the Kettle Crest Scenic Byway site marker. Vegetation within the Log Flume site is diverse with a fairly dense overstory and shrub component. Camp Growden, on the other hand, offers a limited amount of mature overstory trees and much less ground cover and shrubs. The overstory in both sites has a high component of mature lodgepole pine which, at this time, appears to be free of mortality caused by the mountain pine beetle. However, mountain pine beetle mortality is expected in both sites over the next 3-5 years as the current population of beetles continues to spread to new suitable habitats along State Highway 20. Therefore, both interpretive sites would benefit from vegetation plans that would define the preferred mix of tree species, spacing, and removal timeline for the existing overstory vegetation. Implementation of approved 4

5 vegetation plans should enhance the long-term resiliency of the sites to future mortality, ensure adequate screening between the sites and the Highway 20, and improve the quality of each sites recreation setting. Trailheads Sherman Creek Trailhead is located on Forest Road (FR) , near the entrance to Canyon Creek Campground. The trailhead was constructed in 2013 and consists of a small (2-3 car) parking area with rock barriers. This development scale two (Minimal Site Modification/Some Investment) trailhead receives low to moderate use during the summer months. The trailhead is in need of a paved path to connect the parking area with the trail, a registration box and an information board. Both of these items are scheduled to be completed in This trailhead is in good condition, requiring only annual maintenance to meet operation and maintenance (O&M) standards. Jungle Hill Trailhead is located on FR approximately ½ mile north of State Highway 20. This development scale three (Moderate Site Modification/Moderate Investment) trailhead consists of a single vault toilet, information board, registration box, unloading ramp, several stock ties, and a large parking area. The trailhead also provides five campsites designed for stock use, including a table, fire grill, pullthrough parking, and high-line posts. The trailhead and camping area receive moderate use throughout the summer and fall. This trailhead is in good condition, requiring only annual maintenance to meet operation and maintenance (O&M) standards. This trailhead is located within the Profanity Inventoried Roadless Area. As a result, commercial vegetation treatments to improve vegetation conditions are not permitted. Jungle Hill Trailhead. Canyon Creek Trailhead. Kettle Crest Trailhead on Sherman Pass is located on FR immediately north of State Highway 20. This development scale three (Moderate Site Modification/Moderate Investment) trailhead consists of a single vault toilet, information board, registration box, several stock ties, and a large parking area. The trailhead also provides three campsites designed for stock use. All of these sites offer parking and a fire grill, while two of the sites also offer a table. The trailhead and camping area receives moderate use throughout the summer and fall with heavy use on summer weekends. This trailhead is in need of new stock ties, a drainage structure on the entrance road, and a new table. Each of these facilities were damaged while removing mountain pine beetle infested trees from the site over the past two years. Vegetation within the three trailheads consists primarily of low growing groundcover and lodgepole pine with some larch in the overstory. The lodgepole pine within the Kettle Crest Trailhead has been recently 5

6 infected with the mountain pine beetle and heavy mortality with extensive hazard tree removal has already occurred at the site over the past two years. Mountain pine beetle mortality can also be found in the Jungle Hill Trailhead and immediately adjacent to the Sherman Creek Trailhead within Canyon Creek Campground. As a result, additional lodgepole pine mortality is expected to occur over the next 3-5 years in Jungle Hill and Sherman Creek Trailheads. All three trailheads are in need of vegetation plans that would define the preferred mix of tree species, spacing, and removal timeline for the remaining overstory vegetation. Implementation of approved vegetation plans should enhance the long-term resiliency of the sites to future mortality, ensure adequate screening between sites, encourage proper placement of shade trees and, in general, improve the quality of each trailhead s recreation setting. Kettle Crest Trailhead camping area with down Kettle Crest Sno-park information board and toilet lodgepole pine and a damaged table resulting from facility prior to lodgepole removal in hazard tree removal. Sno-parks The planning area contains two Washington State designated sno-parks. The Kettle Crest Sno-Park is located at the top of Sherman Pass and shares the same facilities as the Kettle Crest Trailhead. This snopark provides access to backcountry skiing and snowshoeing opportunities along the Kettle Crest as well as overnight parking accommodations for recreationists that reserve the Snow Peak backcountry cabin. This sno-park is moderately used throughout the winter and heavily used on winter weekends and holidays. Washington State Sno-park permits are required to park at this area from December 1 st through March 31 st. Permit fees are used by the state to plow the parking area and maintain the facilities at the site. The Albian Hill Sno-Park is located just north of State Highway 20 at the base of the Albian Hill Road (FR 2030). This sno-park accesses an extensive groomed snowmobile trail system. The sno-park consists of a small to medium sized parking area that includes FR 2030 and a large pull-out adjacent to the road and an information board. When funding is available, the site also includes a portable toilet facility. No other facilities are provided at this location. This sno-park is moderately used throughout the winter and heavily used on winter weekends and holidays. Washington State Sno-park permits are required to park at this area from December 1 st through March 31 st. Permit fees are used by the state to plow the parking area, maintain the facilities at the site, and groom the trail system. 6

7 Dispersed Recreation Numerous forms of dispersed recreation occur throughout the Sherman Pass planning area in levels varying from seldom to frequently, depending on the activity. The most prominent forms of dispersed recreation (in no order of importance) occurring within the planning area include: camping, scenic driving, hiking, mountain biking, pack and saddle stock use, hunting, berry picking, firewood gathering, fishing, picnicking, shooting, Nordic skiing, backcountry skiing, snowshoeing, snowmobiling, and Off Highway Vehicle (OHV) use. Dispersed Camping Dispersed campsites are spread throughout the planning area. These campsites generally develop over many years as a result of impacts associated with recreational use (loss of ground vegetation as a result of vehicle use, construction of rock fire rings, etc.). Most dispersed campsites within the planning area are located in small openings adjacent to Forest System roads, with a few campsites located along the road prism or at the end of system roads. Several of these sites are located in lodgepole pine stands that show signs of mountain pine beetle mortality and will likely be in need of hazard tree removal and reforestation within the next 3-5 years in order to remain safe for visitors and provide adequate vegetation for screening and shade. Based on the level of soil disturbance, rock fire ring construction, tree damage, and user created structures (toilets, benches, deer racks, etc.), it appears that many of these dispersed campsites receive heavy use on a regular basis throughout the summer months and into the fall hunting season. These significant dispersed recreation sites (Colville National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan pg. 4-36) are of high value to the recreating public and frequently provide a nice mix of shade, open parking/camping area, views, and privacy. Twenty-one significant dispersed campsites were identified and recorded during field surveys, which represents just over 50% of the inventoried dispersed campsites within the planning area. The following pictures are just a couple examples of heavy use dispersed campsites within the planning area. Dispersed campsite along FR with large parking area and fire pit. Dispersed campsite on FR with numerous constructed features and loss of ground vegetation. About half (49%) of the inventoried dispersed campsites located in the planning area appear to be used on an irregular basis, either as an opportunistic place to set up camp before dark, or during hunting season when dispersed campsites within the planning area receive their heaviest use. This assessment is based on the lack of soil disturbance, small fire rings, lack of tree scarring, and high degree of vegetation growing in the fire rings and campsite area. The following pictures represent examples of low-use dispersed campsites within the planning area. 7

8 Dispersed campsite located near end of FR Small grown in firering with old game hanger and no exposed soil. Dispersed campsite located in a pullout along FR Small grown in fire ring, heavy vegetation on parking area. Scenic Driving Sightseeing and driving for pleasure occurs primarily on State Highway 20, the Sherman Pass Scenic Highway. This road is used as part of a larger loop which includes State Highway 21, County Road 602 (Boulder Deer Creek Highway), and US Highway 395, all of which are outside the planning area. Sightseeing/driving for pleasure occurs throughout the summer travel season and into the fall when the numerous stands of western larch and cottonwood turn the hillsides and river corridor into several shades of gold. Other routes used for sightseeing and driving for pleasure include FR 2030 (Albian Hill Road) and FR (Bangs Mountain Road). The majority of both of these routes are located outside of the planning area. Hunting Hunting (primarily deer and turkey) activities occur throughout the planning area. The area s welldeveloped Forest Service road and trail systems provide hunters with easy access to thousands of acres of lightly used terrain. In addition, the abundance of dispersed campsites along with the availability of two developed campgrounds and two trailheads with camping facilities makes getting an early start easy. At times, this area can be intensely hunted and receives consistent use by hunters throughout the late summer, fall, and early winter. Picnicking/Berry Picking Picnicking and berry picking occur throughout the planning area and are supported by the well-developed Forest Service road and trail system. This activity peaks during mid to late summer depending on the elevation and is centered around the huckleberry season. The area around Canyon Creek Campground is of special interest for berry picking and receives heavy day-use and overnight use during the period when huckleberries are ripe and most abundant. Shooting Shooting occurs throughout the planning area, but is heaviest within the Lane Creek Pit where multiple constructed targets set at various distances can be regularly observed. 8

9 Firewood Firewood cutting is limited to the opportunities on the 2013 Colville National Forest Firewood Cutting and Removal Map. All roads open to vehicle traffic on the 2013 Colville National Forest Motor Vehicle Use Map Southwest Area are open to firewood cutting except for those associated with the developed recreation sites listed in this report. Firewood cutting is, however, seasonally restricted between December 1 st and March 31 st on designated winter recreation routes (FRs 2030 and 2053) and in big game winter range including FRs , , , and all roads accessed by the and road systems. The planning area receives consistent use by firewood cutters throughout the late spring, summer, fall and early winter. Use occurs on almost every road accessible with a pickup truck. Fishing Fishing opportunities are quite limited within the planning area due to a lack of larger water bodies capable of sustaining this activity. The limited amount of fishing that occurs within the planning area is located almost entirely along Sherman Creek and the lower section of South Fork Sherman Creek. Snowshoeing/Backcountry Skiing/Nordic Skiing Snowshoeing, Backcountry Skiing, and Nordic Skiing are all popular activities at the higher elevations (Karamip Road on the west side to Albian Hill Road on the east side of Sherman Pass) within the planning area. The majority of this use occurs north and south of Sherman Pass along the Kettle Crest and originates out of the Kettle Crest Sno-park. Additional use occurs along the power corridor when snow conditions are acceptable. This area generally receives a quality snow pack and has easy paved access for passenger vehicles. As a result, the Kettle Crest receives consistent moderate to heavy use by residents of eastern Washington. In addition, the popularity of Snow Peak Cabin (located just outside of the planning area) brings many recreationists from the west side of Washington and numerous neighboring states each winter to recreate along the Kettle Crest as well. On good snow years, Nordic skiing and snowshoeing also occur along lower elevation roads accessed from pull-outs adjacent to State Highway 20. Snowmobiling Snowmobiling occurs primarily on the three designated snowmobile routes (FRs 2020, 2030 and 2053) within the Sherman Pass Project area. FRs 2030 (Albian Hill) and 2053 (Quartz Mountain) are both designated groomed snowmobile routes which are part of the Washington State Sno-park program. FR 2020 is a designated non-groomed snowmobile route that is accessed by small plowed pull-outs near the entrance to the road along State Highway 20. Use in the planning area is light on weekdays throughout the winter, but consistent. Weekend and holiday use is generally moderate to heavy, depending on snow conditions. Rarely does snowmobile use occur off designated routes or their connected road systems either as a result of inconsistent snow, limited terrain, seasonal use restrictions, or a lack of safe, offhighway parking areas. The only consistent off trail use occurs along the power corridor on the east side of Sherman Pass. This use is generally light and increases during good snow years. Trails All or part of eleven designated system trails are located in the Sherman Pass Project Area: Snow Peak Trail #10, Kettle Crest Trail #13 North, Kettle Crest Trail #13 South, Jungle Hill Trail #16, Columbia Mountain Trail #24, Columbia Mountain Spur Trail #24.1, Sherman Peak Loop Trail #72, Sherman Pass Trail #82, Canyon Creek Trail #93, Sherman Tie Trail #96, and Sherman Overlook Trail #96.A. All of these trails except Canyon Creek Trail #93 contain segments that are relatively high in elevation (over 4,300 feet), allowing trail users to enjoy panoramic views of distant valleys and mountains. The majority of these trails that are located west of the Kettle Crest are located within the 1988 White Mountain fire scar. As a result, these trails have extensive segments running through standing dead forests which 9

10 require frequent logout to keep open. All of these trails are in good condition and have received annual maintenance in the past. However, all of the trails in the vicinity of Sherman Pass are located within stands of lodgepole pine. These stands have been experiencing heavy mountain pine beetle mortality. As a result, hazard tree removal and logout efforts are expected to grow substantially over the next 3-5 years. Winter snowmobile routes within the planning area exist entirely on designated road systems and are discussed immediately above under the heading Snowmobiling. Snow Peak Trail #10 parallels a short segment of the planning area s southern boundary just west of the Kettle Crest. This trail provides easy access to the Kettle Crest Trail and Snow Peak Cabin (which sits just south of the planning area). The trail receives moderate use throughout the summer and fall from hikers, mountain bikers, and equestrian riders. The trail receives little to no winter use. The Kettle Crest Trail # 13 North and the Kettle Crest Trail #13 South (KCNRT) are both classified as a National Recreation Trail and are also part of the newly designated Pacific Northwest National Scenic Trail corridor. Over one mile of each of these trails is located within the planning area. However, only 0.12 miles of the Kettle Crest 13 North and 0.53 miles of the Kettle Crest 13 South Trails are outside of the Profanity and Bald-Snow Potential Wilderness Areas (respectively) and may be located within a vegetative treatment unit. The trails are used consistently throughout the year by hikers, equestrian riders, mountain bikers, hunters, Nordic skiers, backcountry skiers, snowshoers and nature enthusiasts. The section of trail located within the planning area receives heavy use during the summer and fall. Winter use is somewhat less, but consistent, as snowshoers, Nordic and backcountry skiers use the trail to access the Columbia Mountain lookout, Snow Peak Cabin, and quality backcountry ski terrain. The KCNRT and its feeder trails provide a multi-season, multi-user recreation experience that is regionally significant (mountain bikes, equestrian riders, backcountry skiing) and nationally recognized. Its inclusion in 2009 as part of the Pacific Northwest National Scenic Trail corridor simply added to its appeal as a trail destination for non-local backcountry trail enthusiasts. Jungle Hill Trail #16 is located completely within the planning area and provides easy access to the Kettle Crest NRT. The trail is popular with mountain bikers, hikers, and equestrian riders and receives moderate use throughout the summer and fall. The trail receives little to no winter use. This trail is located primarily in the Profanity Potential Wilderness Area (PWA). Jungle Hill Trail looking east. Sherman Peak Loop Trail in

11 White Mountain burn area. The east half of the Columbia Mountain Trail #24 loop is located in the planning area. The Columbia Mountain Spur Trail #24.1 is located on the western boundary of the planning area, just north of Sherman Pass. These trails provide easy access to the historic Columbia Mountain Fire Lookout and are popular with mountain bikers, equestrian riders and hikers throughout the summer and fall. In the winter, these trails are popular with Nordic skiers and snowshoers. Use of the trail is moderate throughout the summer, fall, and winter and heavy on weekends and holidays. These trails are located entirely in the Profanity PWA. Sherman Peak Loop Trail #72 is located entirely within the planning area. This loop trail is popular with hikers, mountain bikers, and equestrian riders during the summer and fall. During the winter, the trail is used by snowshoers, Nordic skiers, and backcountry skiers. This is the primary access trail into the Snow Peak Cabin during the winter. Use of the trail is moderate throughout the summer, fall, and winter and heavy on weekends and holidays. This trail is located entirely within the Bald-Snow PWA. Sherman Pass Trail #82 connects the Jungle Hill Trailhead with the Kettle Crest Trailhead. The trail is located entirely within the planning area and is used as part of a loop that includes trails 13N and 16. The trail receives light to moderate use from hikers, mountain bikers, and equestrian riders during the summer and fall. This trail is located along the southeast boundary of the Profanity PWA. Canyon Creek Trail #93 is a paved wheelchair accessible trail that parallels Sherman Creek and connects Canyon Creek Campground with the Log Flume Interpretive Site. The trail is located entirely within the planning area and receives high use during the summer months from hikers and bikers. A short segment of washed out trail was rerouted in The eastern and western ends of the trail are located in stands of lodgepole pine. As a result, mountain pine beetle mortality is expected to increase the need for hazard tree removal along this trail over the next 3-5 years. Bridge on the Sherman Tie Trail. Sherman Overlook Interpretive Trail with slash from mountain pine beetle mortality adjacent to trail. Sherman Tie Trail #96 is a short trail located entirely within the planning area that connects Sherman Overlook Campground with trail #82. The trail is open to mountain bikers and hikers and receives light to moderate summer and fall use. In the winter, the trail receives consistent light use by snowshoers and skiers. This trail is located partially within the Profanity PWA. 11

12 Sherman Overlook Trail #96.A is a short, wheelchair accessible, paved interpretive trail located entirely within the planning area. The trail is open to foot traffic only and receives high use throughout the summer and fall. The trail is located in a stand of lodgepole pine and larch. The lodgepole has experienced heavy mountain pine beetle mortality over the last two years and has been closed to use for public safety while hazard tree removal and clean-up has occurred. These clean-up efforts are expected to continue for the next 2-3 years. Motorized (OHV) Recreation Light to moderate OHV use has occurred historically throughout the planning area. Early use was predominantly by jeeps and motorcycles. This use has transitioned over the past decade to primarily four wheel OHVs (quads, ATVs, UTVs). Prior to the implementation of the Colville National Forest - Interim Motor Vehicle Use Map in 2006, this use occurred without designation or enforcement of routes. There are currently 18 designated routes for OHV use within the Sherman Pass Project area shown on the 2013 Colville National Forest Motor Vehicle Use Map, Southwest Area (MVUM). Table 1: Road Numbers of Designated OHV Routes The route is part of a large loop system located outside of the planning area. Those routes ending in the 200s and 300s (except for 382) are part of an extensive out-and-back road system that incorporates a couple of short loop opportunities. The road is an isolated out-and-back route. The and those roads ending in the 400s are part of two small out-and-back road system that have a main stem with a couple of side roads attached. In general, quality OHV riding opportunities are limited in the planning area. Additional motorized routes were proposed by OHV users to be included on the MVUM within the planning area during travel management collaboration meetings between 2005 and These routes included numerous open and closed roads in the following areas: Albian Hill, Bangs Mountain, Fritz Creek, Graves Mountain, Scalawag Ridge, Milk Creek, South Fork Sherman Creek, and Trout Creek to Lane Creek. Roads associated with these proposed routes are listed in the following table. Table 2: Roads Proposed as OHV Routes These proposed routes could be combined to provide several large loop opportunities both north and south of State Highway 20 and connect with other proposed routes located outside of the planning area. This opportunity would require the construction of new OHV trail between Trout Creek and Lane Creek, Milk Creek and Graves Mountain, Hart Creek and Milk Creek, and McGahee Creek and Albian Hill. In several areas, these trails could be located on existing non-system road templates. Although OHV use is generally light within the planning area, there continues to be interest from local OHV users and the Tri-County Motorized Recreation Association to provide for a system of OHV trails on the Forest that connects communities and provides loop riding opportunities. These traits were clearly identified by participants at the South End Motor Vehicle Use Project public meetings in 2009 as being important to the OHV experience on the Colville National Forest. 12

13 Currently, light to moderate levels of illegal (defined as use occurring on routes not identified on the current MVUM) OHV use is occurring throughout the majority of the planning area. Off-road illegal use is heaviest in the Lane Creek area and near well-established dispersed campsites in the Canyon Creek area. Additional illegal off-road use occurs along FR , FR , within the planning area s gravel pits and along the powerline corridor. Many of these unauthorized routes probably existed well OHV trail leading out of a dispersed campsite near Canyon Creek CG. Illegal OHV use out the end of FR in the Lane Creek area. before off road travel was prohibited in 2006 with the printing of the Colville National Forest Interim MVUM and continues to occur as users follow their historic trails. Most closed and open roads within the planning area show minimal impacts from OHV use during the summer months. However, incidents of illegal use and associated impacts from OHVs generally increase during hunting season. Based on my professional judgment, I believe that historic OHV use, combined with the current popularity of OHVs (in general) and the lack of quality riding opportunities within the Sherman Pass planning area has, in numerous locations, resulted in the continued unauthorized use of closed routes or the development of user created routes that conflict with resource and recreation management objectives. Berms and ditches (tank traps) have proven effective against full-size vehicles, but are not as effective against unauthorized access by OHVs within the planning area. While most users respect the intent of road closures, once a closure is breached, other users often become opportunistic and follow the tracks into the closed areas. Potential Wilderness Area The Sherman Pass Project area encompasses the eastern half of the southern tip of the Profanity (37,712 acres) Potential Wilderness Area (PWA), the northern tip of the Bald-Snow (20,432 acres) PWA, the western portion of the Hoodoo (11,695 acres) PWA, and the northeastern tip of the South Huckleberry (9,939 acres) PWA. There are six other PWAs (Cougar Mountain, Deer Creek, Jackknife, Owl Mountain, Thirteenmile, and Twin Sisters) encompassing 58,968 acres within fifteen air miles of either the Profanity or Bald-Snow PWAs. All but Owl Mountain and Deer Creek are within fifteen air miles of both PWAs. Combined, these ten PWAs account for 138,747 acres within the Okanogan Highlands ecoregion on the Colville National Forest. 13

14 The following is taken from a briefing paper developed by the Colville and Okanogan-Wenatchee Forest Plan Revision Team in August of 2008 titled Briefing: Forest Plan Revision and Inventoried Roadless Areas, Potential Wilderness Areas, and possible Wilderness Recommendations. The briefing paper describes the process used to evaluate inventoried roadless areas on the Colville National Forest for inclusion onto the Potential Wilderness Area Inventory. In the summer of 2005, the Forest plan revision team for the Colville and Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forests began the process of evaluating inventoried roadless areas with the help of interested members of the public. The Forest Service uses inventory criteria from the Forest Service Handbook to evaluate roadless areas for potential wilderness designation. These criteria have been in place since the 1970s. In order to qualify for placement on the inventory of potential wilderness areas, an inventoried roadless area has to meet one or more of the criteria. A few examples of the criteria follow: A potential wilderness area should contain 5,000 acres or more. A potential wilderness area can contain less than 5,000 acres due to physical terrain if it can be preserved; or the area is self-contained such as an island; or the area is contiguous to existing wilderness regardless of size. A potential wilderness area cannot contain forest roads or other permanently authorized roads. The first step of the evaluation process is to use the inventory criteria to validate the boundaries of the 2001 Roadless Rule inventory of roadless areas. Beginning in the summer of 2005, the Forest Service asked the public to participate in the review of inventoried roadless area boundaries through a series of public meetings, web site postings, and electronic and hard copy mailings/newsletters. The public provided the Forest Service with input, which the Forest Service validated. Then the Forest Service made adjustments to the inventoried roadless area boundaries based on a given area s current condition. The second step in the evaluation process is to carefully evaluate each validated inventoried roadless area as additions to the National Wilderness Preservation System. An area recommended as suitable for wilderness must meet the tests of capability, availability, and need. In addition to the inherent wilderness quality it possesses, an area must provide opportunities and experiences that are dependent upon or enhanced by a wilderness environment. Also considered was the ability of the Forest Service to manage the area as wilderness. Capability is further broken down into: 1) the level of natural and undeveloped environment, 2) the level of outstanding opportunities for solitude or primitive and unconfined recreation, 3) the special features, and 4) the manageability of the PWA boundaries. (Profanity, Bald-Snow, Hoodoo, and Wilderness Evaluations May-June 2009) Availability and need for wilderness are not discussed in the effects section of this report as those components are not directly affected by the Sherman Pass Project. The Profanity Roadless Area was assessed during the first and second Roadless Area Review and Evaluation (RARE I and RARE II) processes completed in 1973 and 1979 respectively. In 1973, it was not chosen for future wilderness study and in 1979 it was not recommended for wilderness designation. In 2006, analysis of the Profanity Roadless Area by the Forest Plan Revision Team (using the process described above) resulted in the removal of approximately 1,923 acres from the previous inventory due to nonconforming uses such as road construction and logging; 10,637 acres were added to the previous inventory as they met the criteria for a potential wilderness area as described in Forest Service Handbook (FSH) , Chapter 70. (Profanity Wilderness Evaluation, Forest Plan Revision Team, May-June 2009) The following chart depicts the current 1988 Colville National Forest Land and Resource 14

15 Management Plan direction for the land base identified in 2006 as the Profanity PWA. (Profanity Wilderness Evaluation, Forest Plan Revision Team, May-June 2009) Table 1--Management area percentages (rounded) for the Profanity PWA - Colville National Forest MA1 Old Growth Dependant Species Habitat MA11 Semi-primitive, Nonmotorized Recreation MA3A Recreation MA5 Scenic Timber MA7 Wood/ Forage 1% 60% 2% 16% 21% The Bald-Snow Roadless Area was assessed during the first and second Roadless Area Review and Evaluation (RARE I and RARE II) processes completed in 1973 and 1979 respectively. In 1973, it was identified but not chosen for future wilderness study and in 1979 it was identified as non-wilderness. In 2006, analysis of the Bald-Snow Roadless Area by the Forest Plan Revision Team (using the process described above) resulted in the removal of approximately 3,762 acres from the previous inventory due to nonconforming uses such as road construction and logging; 917 acres were added to the previous inventory as they met the criteria for a potential wilderness area as described in Forest Service Handbook (FSH) , Chapter 70. (Bald-Snow Wilderness Evaluation, Forest Plan Revision Team, May-June 2009) The following chart depicts the current 1988 Colville National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan direction for the land base identified in 2006 as the Bald-Snow PWA. (Bald-Snow Wilderness Evaluation, Forest Plan Revision Team, May-June 2009) Table 1--Management area percentages (rounded) for the Bald- Snow PWA - Colville National Forest MA11 Semi-primitive, Non-motorized Recreation MA3A Recreation MA4 Research Natural Area MA5 Scenic Timber MA7 Wood/ Forage 66% 3% 5% 21% 5% The Hoodoo Roadless Area was assessed during the first and second Roadless Area Review and Evaluation (RARE I and RARE II) processes completed in 1973 and 1979 respectively. In 1973, it was identified but not chosen for future wilderness study and in 1979 it was not recommended for wilderness designation. In 2006, analysis of the Hoodoo Roadless Area by the Forest Plan Revision Team (using the process described above) resulted in the removal of approximately 451 acres from the previous inventory due to nonconforming uses such as road construction and logging; 4,990 acres were added to the previous inventory as they met the criteria for a potential wilderness area as described in Forest Service Handbook (FSH) , Chapter 70. (Hoodoo Wilderness Evaluation, Forest Plan Revision Team, May-June 2009) The following chart depicts the current 1988 Colville National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan direction for the land base identified in 2006 as the Hoodoo PWA. (Hoodoo Wilderness Evaluation, Forest Plan Revision Team, May-June 2009) Table 1--Management area percentages (rounded) for the Hoodoo PWA - Colville National Forest MA1 Old Growth Dependent Species Habitat MA3A Recreation MA5 Scenic Timber MA7 Wood/ Forage MA11 Semi-primitive, Non-motorized Recreation 4% 3% 23% 24% 46% 15

16 The South Huckleberry Roadless Area was assessed during the first and second Roadless Area Review and Evaluation (RARE I and RARE II) processes completed in 1973 and 1979 respectively. In 1973, it was identified but not chosen for future wilderness study and in 1979 it was not recommended for wilderness designation. In 2006, analysis of the South Huckleberry Roadless Area by the Forest Plan Revision Team (using the process described above) resulted in the removal of approximately 639 acres from the previous inventory due to road construction and logging; 430 acres were added to the previous inventory as they met the criteria for a potential wilderness area as described in Forest Service Handbook (FSH) , Chapter 70. (South Huckleberry Wilderness Evaluation, Forest Plan Revision Team, May-June 2009) The following chart depicts the current 1988 Colville National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan direction for the land base identified in 2006 as the South Huckleberry PWA. (South Huckleberry Wilderness Evaluation, Forest Plan Revision Team, May-June 2009) Table 1--Management area percentages (rounded) for the South Huckleberry PWA - Colville National Forest MA1 Old Growth Dependent Species Habitat MA3A Recreation MA5 Scenic Timber MA7 Wood/ Forage MA8 Winter Range MA10 Semiprimitive Motorized Recreation 2% 1% 26% 33% 19% 18% Within the Sherman Pass Project area, access into the Profanity PWA occurs primarily through the Kettle Crest Trail #13 North, Jungle Hill Trail #16, and Sherman Pass Trail #82. In addition, several State and National Forest system roads open to motorized use are within close proximity of the PWA boundary and provide easy access from the planning area into the backcountry for hiking, camping, orienteering, skiing, skill development and nature exploration. Like the Profanity PWA, access into the Bald-Snow PWA occurs primarily through trails including the Kettle Crest Trail #13 South and the Snow Peak Trail #10. In addition, the PWA can also be accessed directly from State Highway 20 and the South Fork Sherman Creek Road (FR ). Both roads provide easy access from the planning area into the backcountry for hiking, camping, orienteering, skiing, skill development and nature exploration. Access into the Hoodoo PWA from within the Sherman Pass Project Area is limited to crosscountry travel originating from the Albian Hill Road (FR 2030), the Graves Mountain road system (FR and FR200450), and the Lane Creek road system (FR200325). There is no trail access into the Hoodoo PWA from the planning area, making access into the PWA for hiking, camping, orienteering, skiing, skill development and nature exploration more difficult than the Profanity and Bald-Snow PWAs. Access into the South Huckleberry PWA from within the Sherman Pass Project Area is also limited to cross-country travel originating from State Highway 20 and FR (Bangs Mountain). There is no trail access into the South Huckleberry PWA from the planning area, making access into the PWA for hiking, camping, orienteering, skiing, skill development and nature exploration more difficult than the Profanity and Bald-Snow PWAs. Inventoried Roadless Area (IRA) Small portions (similar in size to the PWA segments described above) of the Profanity (29,418 acres), Bald-Snow (24,383 acres), Hoodoo (7,103 acres), South Huckleberry (10,090 acres), and Bangs (3,733 acres) Inventoried Roadless Areas, as identified in Appendix C of the 1988 Final 16

17 Environmental Impact Statement for the Colville National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan and confirmed under the 2001 Roadless Rule, are all located within the Sherman Pass Project area. To remain consistent with the direction given in the 2001 Roadless Rule, these areas would not be available for road construction or commercial harvest if the Sherman Pass Project is implemented. Recreation Opportunity Spectrum The Recreation Opportunity Spectrum (ROS) is one of the tools that the Forest Service uses to frame the setting when describing the potential recreation experience within a given area. ROS is the basic framework for inventorying, planning and managing the recreation resource in accordance with the Forest and Rangeland Renewable Resources Planning Act of 1974 (RPA), as amended by the National Forest Management Act of 1976 (NFMA).(USDA Forest Service, ROS Users Guide) The Colville National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan (1988) directs recreation managers to provide for a broad range of ROS settings and recreational opportunities The Recreation Opportunity Spectrum provides a framework allowing administrators to manage settings and users to enjoy a variety of outdoor environments. It is not a land classification system, but a method of describing and providing a mix of recreation opportunities based on the desired setting, activity, and experience.(usda Forest Service, ROS Users Guide) The Sherman Pass Project Area has a fairly even mix of Roaded Modified (RM), Roaded Natural (RN), and Semi-Primitive Non-Motorized (SPNM) ROS classes. The SPNM ROS class is centered on the Kettle Crest and is consistent with the Profanity and Bald-Snow IRA and PWA designations. The RM and RN ROS classes are located along both sides of State Highway 20 where previous management activities have occurred. The planning area also contains three small pieces of Semi-Primitive Motorized (SPM) ROS classification. These areas are located south of State Highway 20, two east of the Kettle Crest and one west of the Kettle Crest. 17

Preferred Recreation Recommendations Stemilt-Squilchuck Recreation Plan March 2018

Preferred Recreation Recommendations Stemilt-Squilchuck Recreation Plan March 2018 Preferred Recreation Recommendations Stemilt-Squilchuck Recreation Plan March 2018 Below are the recommended recreation ideas and strategies that package together the various recreation concepts compiled

More information

Continental Divide National Scenic Trail Legislative History and Planning Guidance

Continental Divide National Scenic Trail Legislative History and Planning Guidance Continental Divide National Scenic Trail Legislative History and Planning Guidance Legislation, Policy, and Direction Regarding National Scenic Trails The National Trails System Act, P.L. 90-543, was passed

More information

Final Recreation Report. Sunflower Allotment Grazing Analysis. July 2015

Final Recreation Report. Sunflower Allotment Grazing Analysis. July 2015 Final Recreation Report Sunflower Allotment Grazing Analysis July 2015 Table of Contents Introduction... 3 Affected Environment... 3 Four Peaks Wilderness Area... 3 Dispersed Recreation... 3 Environmental

More information

November 6, RE: OBJECTION Regarding the Revised Colville Forest Plan. To Objection Reviewing Officer:

November 6, RE: OBJECTION Regarding the Revised Colville Forest Plan. To Objection Reviewing Officer: 305 N. 83 rd Street Seattle, WA 98103 206-633-1992 www.wawild.org info@wawild.org November 6, 2018 USDA Forest Service Attn: Chris French, Objection Reviewing Officer 1400 Independence Ave. SW, EMC-PEEARS,

More information

Non-motorized Trail Plan & Proposal. August 8, 2014

Non-motorized Trail Plan & Proposal. August 8, 2014 Town of Star Valley Ranch, Wyoming and the Star Valley Ranch Association in partnership with the USDA Forest Service, Bridger-Teton National Forest, Greys River Ranger District Non-motorized Trail Plan

More information

5.0 OUTDOOR RECREATION OPPORTUNITIES AND MANAGEMENT

5.0 OUTDOOR RECREATION OPPORTUNITIES AND MANAGEMENT 5.0 OUTDOOR RECREATION OPPORTUNITIES AND MANAGEMENT 5.1 Introduction This section describes the range of recreational activities that currently take place in Marble Range and Edge Hills Parks, as well

More information

PURPOSE AND NEED. Introduction

PURPOSE AND NEED. Introduction Public Scoping: Allocation of Recreation Capacity for Commercial Outfitter Guide Services on North Kruzof Island Trails (Kruzof Island Outfitter Guide) PURPOSE AND NEED Introduction The U.S. Department

More information

Logo Department Name Agency Organization Organization Address Information 5700 North Sabino Canyon Road

Logo Department Name Agency Organization Organization Address Information 5700 North Sabino Canyon Road Logo Department Name Agency Organization Organization Address Information United States Forest Coronado National Forest 5700 North Sabino Canyon Road Department of Service Santa Catalina Ranger District

More information

Fremont Point Cabin Reconstruction and Expansion Project Project Proposal & Public Scoping Documentation

Fremont Point Cabin Reconstruction and Expansion Project Project Proposal & Public Scoping Documentation Fremont Point Cabin Reconstruction and Expansion Project Fremont-Winema National Forests Silver Lake Ranger District The Silver Lake Ranger District of the Fremont-Winema National Forests is proposing

More information

WORKSHEET 1 Wilderness Qualities or Attributes Evaluating the Effects of Project Activities on Wilderness Attributes

WORKSHEET 1 Wilderness Qualities or Attributes Evaluating the Effects of Project Activities on Wilderness Attributes WORKSHEET 1 Wilderness Qualities or Attributes Evaluating the Effects of Project Activities on Wilderness Attributes Date: 3/7/2017 Roadless Area: Ruby South Description of Project Activity or Impact to

More information

Theme: Predominately natural/natural appearing; rustic improvements to protect resources. Size*: 2,500 + acres Infrastructure**:

Theme: Predominately natural/natural appearing; rustic improvements to protect resources. Size*: 2,500 + acres Infrastructure**: Recreation Opportunity Spectrum (ROS) Classes The Recreation Opportunity Spectrum (ROS) provides a way to describe the variations in the degree of isolation from the sounds and influences of people, and

More information

Marchand Provincial Park. Management Plan

Marchand Provincial Park. Management Plan Marchand Provincial Park Management Plan 2 Marchand Provincial Park Table of Contents 1. Introduction... 3 2. Park History... 3 3. Park Attributes... 4 3.1 Natural... 4 3.2 Recreational... 4 3.3 Additional

More information

3.12 Roadless Areas and Unroaded Areas

3.12 Roadless Areas and Unroaded Areas 3.12 Roadless Areas and Unroaded Areas Introduction This analysis focuses on the direct and indirect effects of activities proposed in the Como Forest Health project on roadless area values, including

More information

White Mountain National Forest Saco Ranger District

White Mountain National Forest Saco Ranger District United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service White Mountain National Forest 33 Kancamagus Highway Conway, NH 03818 Comm: (603) 447-5448 TTY: (603) 447-3121 File Code: 1950 Date: February 26,

More information

Lakeview-Reeder Fuel Reduction Project

Lakeview-Reeder Fuel Reduction Project Lakeview-Reeder Fuel Reduction Project Recreation Resource Report Prepared by: Dale Schrempp Recreation Manager Priest Lake Ranger District Report completed: March 25, 2008 Abstract In summary, this report

More information

RECREATION. Seven issues were identified that pertain to the effects of travel management on outdoor recreation within portions of the project area.

RECREATION. Seven issues were identified that pertain to the effects of travel management on outdoor recreation within portions of the project area. RECREATION Seven issues were identified that pertain to the effects of travel management on outdoor recreation within portions of the project area. OPPORTUNITIES FOR SOLITUDE / QUIET TRAILS. One attraction

More information

Fossil Creek Wild & Scenic River Comprehensive River Management Plan Forest Service Proposed Action - details March 28, 2011

Fossil Creek Wild & Scenic River Comprehensive River Management Plan Forest Service Proposed Action - details March 28, 2011 Fossil Creek Wild & Scenic River Comprehensive River Management Plan Forest Service Proposed Action - details March 28, 2011 Primary Goals of the Proposed Action 1. Maintain or enhance ORVs primarily by

More information

FINAL TESTIMONY 1 COMMITTEE ON RESOURCES UNITED STATES HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. July 13, 2005 CONCERNING. Motorized Recreational Use of Federal Lands

FINAL TESTIMONY 1 COMMITTEE ON RESOURCES UNITED STATES HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. July 13, 2005 CONCERNING. Motorized Recreational Use of Federal Lands FINAL TESTIMONY 1 STATEMENT OF DALE BOSWORTH CHIEF Of the FOREST SERVICE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Before the SUBCOMMITTEE ON FORESTS AND FOREST HEALTH And the SUBCOMMITTEE ON NATIONAL PARKS,

More information

Tahoe National Forest Over-Snow Vehicle Use Designation

Tahoe National Forest Over-Snow Vehicle Use Designation Tahoe National Forest Over-Snow Vehicle Use Designation USDA Forest Service Tahoe National Forest February 20, 2015 Introduction The Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture will prepare an Environmental

More information

GREENWOOD VEGETATION MANAGEMENT

GREENWOOD VEGETATION MANAGEMENT APPENDIX G GREENWOOD VEGETATION MANAGEMENT PROJECT RECREATION RESOURCE REPORT Prepared by: Laurie A. Smith Supervisory Forester Stearns Ranger District Daniel Boone National Forest August 4, 2016 The

More information

CHAPTER 5. Chapter 5 Recreation Element

CHAPTER 5. Chapter 5 Recreation Element CHAPTER 5 Recreation Element Chapter 5 Recreation Element The Recreation Element of the Meyers Area Plan is a supplement to the Recreation Element of the TRPA Regional Plan and the El Dorado County General

More information

Buford / New Castle Motorized Trail

Buford / New Castle Motorized Trail Buford / New Castle Motorized Trail Rifle Ranger District, White River National Forest Garfield County, Colorado Comments Welcome The Rifle Ranger District of the White River National Forest welcomes your

More information

Recreation Opportunity Spectrum for River Management v

Recreation Opportunity Spectrum for River Management v Recreation Opportunity Spectrum for Management v. 120803 Introduction The following Recreation Opportunity Spectrum (ROS) characterizations and matrices mirror the presentation in the ROS Primer and Field

More information

Thank you for the opportunity to comment on the proposed action to add trails and trailheads to the Red Rock District trail system.

Thank you for the opportunity to comment on the proposed action to add trails and trailheads to the Red Rock District trail system. July 14, 2010 Jennifer Burns Red Rock Ranger District PO Box 20429 Sedona, AZ 86341 Flagstaff Biking Organization PO Box 23851 Flagstaff, AZ 86002 Dear Jennifer- Thank you for the opportunity to comment

More information

Dumont Dunes Special Recreation Management Area (SRMA)

Dumont Dunes Special Recreation Management Area (SRMA) Dumont Dunes Special Recreation Management Area (SRMA) RMA/RECREATION MANAGEMENT ZONE (RMZ) OBJECTIVE(S) DECISIONS Objective Statement: Designate this area as a Special Recreation Management Area. To manage

More information

S Central Coast Heritage Protection Act APRIL 21, 2016

S Central Coast Heritage Protection Act APRIL 21, 2016 STATEMENT OF GLENN CASAMASSA ASSOCIATE DEPUTY CHIEF, NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM U.S. FOREST SERVICE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BEFORE THE UNITED STATES SENATE COMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND NATURAL RESOURCES

More information

APPENDIX C RECREATION OPPORTUNITY SPECTRUM PROCESS AND CLASSES

APPENDIX C RECREATION OPPORTUNITY SPECTRUM PROCESS AND CLASSES APPENDIX C RECREATION OPPORTUNITY SPECTRUM PROCESS AND CLASSES RECREATION OPPORTUNITY SPECTRUM PROCESS Recreation area management objectives are defined through a planning process referred to as the Recreation

More information

Trout-West Fuels Reduction Project Pike/San Isabel National Forest Recreation Specialist Report Jan Langerman

Trout-West Fuels Reduction Project Pike/San Isabel National Forest Recreation Specialist Report Jan Langerman Trout-West Fuels Reduction Project Pike/San Isabel National Forest Recreation Specialist Report Jan Langerman Note: If there are any inconsistencies between this report and the Trout-West Final EIS, the

More information

Deer Creek. Recreation Report. Prepared by: for: Pat Hart Forestry Technician. Bonners Ferry Ranger District Idaho Panhandle National Forest

Deer Creek. Recreation Report. Prepared by: for: Pat Hart Forestry Technician. Bonners Ferry Ranger District Idaho Panhandle National Forest Deer Creek Recreation Report Prepared by: Pat Hart Forestry Technician for: Bonners Ferry Ranger District Idaho Panhandle National Forest Date: January 28, 2015 The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)

More information

Recreation Effects Report Travel Management

Recreation Effects Report Travel Management United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Southwestern Region Recreation Effects Report Travel Management Camino Real Ranger District Carson National Forest September 2013 /s/ Kathryn Furr

More information

BAYFIELD COUNTY FOREST COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER 700 ACCESS MANAGEMENT ROADS AND TRAILS

BAYFIELD COUNTY FOREST COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER 700 ACCESS MANAGEMENT ROADS AND TRAILS BAYFIELD COUNTY FOREST COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER 700 ACCESS MANAGEMENT ROADS AND TRAILS 700 Access Management/Roads and Trails 3 700.1 History 3 700.2 Current Status 3 700.3

More information

Appendix A BC Provincial Parks System Goals

Appendix A BC Provincial Parks System Goals Appendix A BC Provincial Parks System Goals The British Columbia Provincial Parks System has two mandates: To conserve significant and representative natural and cultural resources To provide a wide variety

More information

White Mountain National Forest Saco Ranger District

White Mountain National Forest Saco Ranger District United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service White Mountain National Forest Saco Ranger District 33 Kancamagus Highway Conway, NH 03818 Comm: (603) 447-5448 TTY: (603) 447-3121 File Code: 1950

More information

Understanding the caring capacity of the visitor experience Provide facilities to support a high level user experience Address visual quality through

Understanding the caring capacity of the visitor experience Provide facilities to support a high level user experience Address visual quality through Understanding the caring capacity of the visitor experience Provide facilities to support a high level user experience Address visual quality through recreation ecological restoration opportunities Collaboration

More information

April 10, Mark Stiles San Juan Public Lands Center Manager 15 Burnett Court Durango, CO Dear Mark,

April 10, Mark Stiles San Juan Public Lands Center Manager 15 Burnett Court Durango, CO Dear Mark, Mark Stiles San Juan Public Lands Center Manager 15 Burnett Court Durango, CO 81301 Dear Mark, We are pleased to offer the following comments on the draft San Juan Public Lands Center management plans

More information

Hermosa Area Preservation The Colorado Trail Foundation 4/11/2008

Hermosa Area Preservation The Colorado Trail Foundation 4/11/2008 Hermosa Area Preservation The Colorado Trail Foundation 4/11/2008 Legend d o Tr ail NPA - National Protection Area ra NCA - National Conservation Area o e C Th The Colorado Trail lo FS inventoried Roadless

More information

Description of the Proposed Action for the Big Creek / Yellow Pine Travel Plan (Snow-free Season) and Big Creek Ford Project

Description of the Proposed Action for the Big Creek / Yellow Pine Travel Plan (Snow-free Season) and Big Creek Ford Project Description of the Proposed Action for the Big Creek / Yellow Pine Travel Plan (Snow-free Season) and Big Creek Ford Project Payette National Forest Krassel Ranger District Valley and Idaho Counties, Idaho

More information

Whitefish Range Partnership Tentatively Approved by WRP 11/18/2013!Rec. Wilderness Page 1

Whitefish Range Partnership Tentatively Approved by WRP 11/18/2013!Rec. Wilderness Page 1 Whitefish Range Partnership Tentatively Approved by WRP 11/18/2013!Rec. Wilderness Page 1 Recommended Wilderness Background The Whitefish Range has a long management and legislative history associated

More information

Crystal Lake Area Trails

Crystal Lake Area Trails Lake Area Trails Welcome to the Lake area of the Big Snowy Mountains! This island mountain range in central Montana features peaks reaching to 8,600 feet and long, high ridges from which vistas of the

More information

Please Tell Us What You Think: Candidate Sites for Recreation Business Activities

Please Tell Us What You Think: Candidate Sites for Recreation Business Activities Please Tell Us What You Think: Candidate Sites for Recreation Business Activities Background In January 2015, the Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission (Commission) approved some forms of privately

More information

DECISION MEMO. Rawhide Trail #7073 Maintenance and Reconstruction

DECISION MEMO. Rawhide Trail #7073 Maintenance and Reconstruction Page 1 of 6 Background DECISION MEMO USDA Forest Service Jefferson Ranger District Jefferson County, Montana Rawhide Trail #7073 is located in the Elkhorn Mountain Range approximately 10 miles east of

More information

Kreist Creek Recreation Report

Kreist Creek Recreation Report Kreist Creek Recreation Report Prepared by: Pat Hart Forestry Technician For: Bonners Ferry Ranger District Idaho Panhandle National Forest 1/30/2014 The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits

More information

Kelly Motorized Trails Project Proposed Action

Kelly Motorized Trails Project Proposed Action Kelly Motorized Trails Project Proposed Action November 28, 2011 The Flagstaff Ranger District of the Coconino National Forest is seeking public input on the proposed Kelly Motorized Trails Project (formerly

More information

Yard Creek Provincial Park. Management Plan

Yard Creek Provincial Park. Management Plan Yard Creek Provincial Park Management Plan Draft January 2010 Yard Creek Provincial Park Management Plan Approved by: telàlsemkin/siyam/chief Scott Benton Bill Williams Squamish Executive Director ation

More information

TAYLOR CANYON RANCH COLORADO - ROUTT COUNTY - STEAMBOAT SPRINGS

TAYLOR CANYON RANCH COLORADO - ROUTT COUNTY - STEAMBOAT SPRINGS TAYLOR CANYON RANCH COLORADO - ROUTT COUNTY - STEAMBOAT SPRINGS Tucked up against the steep valley shaped by Mt. Pau and rising to the Routt National Forest, Taylor Canyon Ranch is an easily accessible,

More information

Restore and implement protected status that is equivalent, or better than what was lost during the mid-1990 s

Restore and implement protected status that is equivalent, or better than what was lost during the mid-1990 s THE ROSSLAND RANGE, OLD GLORY AREA. Executive summary. The Friends of the Rossland Range Society, on behalf of the local outdoor community, seeks to accomplish the following with respect to the Old Glory

More information

RE: Access Fund Comments on Yosemite National Park Wilderness Stewardship Plan, Preliminary Ideas and Concepts

RE: Access Fund Comments on Yosemite National Park Wilderness Stewardship Plan, Preliminary Ideas and Concepts September 30, 2016 Superintendent Yosemite National Park Attn: Wilderness Stewardship Plan P.O. Box 577 Yosemite, CA 95389 RE: Access Fund Comments on Yosemite National Park Wilderness Stewardship Plan,

More information

RECREATION. 1. Conflict between motorized and non-motorized recreation uses,

RECREATION. 1. Conflict between motorized and non-motorized recreation uses, Island Unit Trail System Additions Project Chapter 3. Recreation RECREATION INTRODUCTION This section discusses the effects to public recreation opportunities and experiences. The type of recreational

More information

Percentage Participation

Percentage Participation 1. Sustainable Recreation Sustainable Recreation is defined as the set of recreation settings and opportunities on the National Forest System that is ecologically, economically, and socially sustainable

More information

Trail Phasing Plan. Note: Trails in the Clear Creek Canyon area (Segments will be finalized in the future to minimize wildlife impacts

Trail Phasing Plan. Note: Trails in the Clear Creek Canyon area (Segments will be finalized in the future to minimize wildlife impacts Note: Trails in the Clear Creek Canyon area (Segments 2 5 and a future JCOS connection) will be finalized in the future to minimize wildlife impacts Trail Phasing Plan P Parking 3 Easy Trail Intermediate

More information

Tracy Ridge Shared Use Trails and Plan Amendment Project

Tracy Ridge Shared Use Trails and Plan Amendment Project Tracy Ridge Shared Use Trails and Plan Amendment Project Scoping Document Forest Service Allegheny National Forest Bradford Ranger District McKean, County, Pennsylvania In accordance with Federal civil

More information

Wilderness Specialist s Report

Wilderness Specialist s Report United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service July 2009 Wilderness Specialist s Report Travel Management Rule EIS USDA Forest Service Southwestern Region Apache-Sitgreaves National Forests Prepared

More information

112th CONGRESS. 1st Session H. R. 113 IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

112th CONGRESS. 1st Session H. R. 113 IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES HR 113 IH 112th CONGRESS 1st Session H. R. 113 To provide for additions to the Cucamonga and Sheep Mountain Wilderness Areas in the Angeles and San Bernardino National Forests and the protection of existing

More information

ANAGEMENT. LAN November, 1996

ANAGEMENT. LAN November, 1996 M ANAGEMENT P LAN November, 1996 for Paul Lake Provincial Park Ministry of Environment, Lands and Parks BC Parks Department Paul Lake Provincial Park M ANAGEMENT P LAN Prepared by BC Parks Kamloops Area

More information

SOCIAL CONFLICT BETWEEN MOTORIZED AND NON-MOTORIZED RECREATIONAL ACTIVITIES.

SOCIAL CONFLICT BETWEEN MOTORIZED AND NON-MOTORIZED RECREATIONAL ACTIVITIES. SOCIAL CONFLICT BETWEEN MOTORIZED AND NON-MOTORIZED RECREATIONAL ACTIVITIES. There is a great disparity in opinions about the effects on a person s recreational experience when they encounter others on

More information

National Recreation Trail Application for Designation

National Recreation Trail Application for Designation National Recreation Trail Application for Designation Introduction Thank you for your interest in the National Recreation Trail (NRT) program. Completed NRT application packages must be submitted by December

More information

13.1 REGIONAL TOURISM ISSUES AND SUMMARY OF FINDINGS

13.1 REGIONAL TOURISM ISSUES AND SUMMARY OF FINDINGS 13 REGIONAL TOURISM T he County of Mariposa s recreation needs and facilities fall within two categories: regional tourism and local recreation. This Element focuses on regional tourism issues related

More information

Decision Memo for Desolation Trail: Mill D to Desolation Lake Trail Relocation

Decision Memo for Desolation Trail: Mill D to Desolation Lake Trail Relocation for Salt Lake County, Utah Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest Salt Lake Ranger District 1. Background The present location of the Desolation Trail (#1159) between Mill D and Desolation Lake follows old

More information

Bradley Brook Relocation Project. Scoping Notice. Saco Ranger District. United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service

Bradley Brook Relocation Project. Scoping Notice. Saco Ranger District. United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Bradley Brook Relocation Project United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Scoping Notice White Mountain National Forest February 2011 For Information Contact: Jenny Burnett White Mountain

More information

Kiowa and Rita Blanca National Grasslands Travel Management Environmental Assessment. Recreation Specialist Report

Kiowa and Rita Blanca National Grasslands Travel Management Environmental Assessment. Recreation Specialist Report Kiowa and Rita Blanca National Grasslands Travel Management Environmental Assessment Recreation Specialist Report (Unit K-109 accessed by National Forest System Road K107, Harding County, New Mexico) Prepared

More information

Draft Revised Land Management Plan and DEIS Comments

Draft Revised Land Management Plan and DEIS Comments December 28, 2017 Dan Dallas, Forest Supervisor Rio Grande National Forest Attn: Rio Grande Forest Plan Revision 1803 W. U.S. Highway 160 Monte Vista, CO 81144 rgnf_forest_plan@fs.fed.us Draft Revised

More information

National Recreation Trail Update Form

National Recreation Trail Update Form National Recreation Trail Update Form Introduction Thank you for taking the time to complete this form. Your assistance will help ensure that the National Recreation Trail (NRT) database is complete and

More information

Decision Memo Broken Wheel Ranch Equestrian Outfitter Special-Use Permit Proposed Action

Decision Memo Broken Wheel Ranch Equestrian Outfitter Special-Use Permit Proposed Action Decision Memo Broken Wheel Ranch Equestrian Outfitter Special-Use Permit USDA Forest Service Mississippi Bluffs Ranger District, Shawnee National Forest Jackson and Union Counties, Illinois Proposed Action

More information

SIMON CANYON AREA OF CRITICAL ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERN (ACEC)

SIMON CANYON AREA OF CRITICAL ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERN (ACEC) SIMON CANYON AREA OF CRITICAL ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERN (ACEC) Activities: Facilities: Season / Hours: Description: Hiking, backpacking, fishing, picnicking, watchable wildlife. A graveled parking area, picnic

More information

Sawtooth National Forest Fairfield Ranger District

Sawtooth National Forest Fairfield Ranger District United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Sawtooth National Forest Fairfield Ranger District P.O. Box 189 Fairfield, ID. 83327 208-764-3202 Fax: 208-764-3211 File Code: 1950/7700 Date: December

More information

Connie Rudd Superintendent, Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park

Connie Rudd Superintendent, Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park and Curecanti National Recreation Area Information Brochure #1 Wilderness and Backcountry Management Plan

More information

Response to Public Comments

Response to Public Comments Appendix D Response to Public Comments Comment Letter # Response 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39,

More information

Wallowa Falls Hydroelectric Project FERC Project No. P-308 Proposed Study Plans - Recreation August 2011

Wallowa Falls Hydroelectric Project FERC Project No. P-308 Proposed Study Plans - Recreation August 2011 Wallowa Falls Hydroelectric Project FERC Project No. P-308 August 2011 Prepared by: PacifiCorp Energy Hydro Resources 825 NE Multnomah, Suite 1500 Portland, OR 97232 For Public Review Wallowa Falls Hydroelectric

More information

Trail Beginning Elevation: 7553 ft The Poison Creek Trailhead is located at the end of National Forest Road 646E (NF-646E).

Trail Beginning Elevation: 7553 ft The Poison Creek Trailhead is located at the end of National Forest Road 646E (NF-646E). West Mountain Trails Poison Creek Trail #134 Length: 2.9 miles (4.7 km) Difficulty Horseback: A good trail for the first time west mountain rider, some steep sections Hiking: Most Difficult USGS Maps:

More information

Alternative 3 Prohibit Road Construction, Reconstruction, and Timber Harvest Except for Stewardship Purposes B Within Inventoried Roadless Areas

Alternative 3 Prohibit Road Construction, Reconstruction, and Timber Harvest Except for Stewardship Purposes B Within Inventoried Roadless Areas Roadless Area Conservation FEIS Summary Table S-1. Comparison of Key Characteristics and Effects by Prohibition Alternative. The effects summarized in this table A would occur in inventoried roadless areas

More information

Clearwater Lake Provincial Park. Draft Management Plan

Clearwater Lake Provincial Park. Draft Management Plan Clearwater Lake Provincial Park Draft Management Plan Clearwater Lake Provincial Park Draft Management Plan Table of Contents 1. Introduction... 3 2. Park History... 4 3. Park Attributes... 4 3.1 Location/Access...4

More information

St. Joe Travel Management Inventoried Roadless Area Report

St. Joe Travel Management Inventoried Roadless Area Report St. Joe Travel Management Inventoried Roadless Area Report Lynette Myhre and Tracy Gravelle July 2015 Regulatory Framework Idaho Roadless Rule Roadless area descriptions from the Idaho Roadless Conservation

More information

F. Forest Recreation Management

F. Forest Recreation Management F. Forest Recreation Management F.1) Park and Recreation Management F.1.A. Program Overview. The park and recreation program has been in existence since 1980. With ever increasing outdoor recreation demands

More information

Wilderness Process #NP-1810: Your letter ID is NP September 5, 2018

Wilderness Process #NP-1810: Your letter ID is NP September 5, 2018 Wilderness Process #NP-1810: Your letter ID is NP-1810-2602-96 September 5, 2018 RE: GMUG Wilderness Evaluation Revised Evaluation Criteria and Draft Report Forest Revision Planning Team: The Continental

More information

KANANASKIS COUNTRY PROVINCIAL RECREATION AREAS MANAGEMENT PLAN DRAFT TERMS OF REFERENCE - November 20, 2007

KANANASKIS COUNTRY PROVINCIAL RECREATION AREAS MANAGEMENT PLAN DRAFT TERMS OF REFERENCE - November 20, 2007 KANANASKIS COUNTRY PROVINCIAL RECREATION AREAS MANAGEMENT PLAN DRAFT TERMS OF REFERENCE - November 20, 2007 BACKGROUND There are 42 Provincial Recreation Areas (PRAs) within Kananaskis Country located

More information

System Group Meeting #1. March 2014

System Group Meeting #1. March 2014 System Group Meeting #1 March 2014 Meeting #1 Outcomes 1. Understand Your Role 2. List of Revisions to Existing Conditions 3. Information Sources Study Area The Purpose of Mountain Accord is to Preserve

More information

Salt River Allotments Vegetative Management EIS Draft Recreation Affected Environment Report Don R. Sullivan November 6, 2012

Salt River Allotments Vegetative Management EIS Draft Recreation Affected Environment Report Don R. Sullivan November 6, 2012 Salt River Allotments Vegetative Management EIS Draft Recreation Affected Environment Report Don R. Sullivan November 6, 2012 Introduction The area surrounding the Salt River Canyon, the Salt River Canyon

More information

3.6 Roadless Areas and Unroaded Areas

3.6 Roadless Areas and Unroaded Areas 3.6 Roadless Areas and Unroaded Areas Introduction This analysis focuses on the direct and indirect effects of activities proposed in the Meadow Vapor project on roadless area values, including unroaded

More information

Discussion Topics. But what does counting tell us? Current Trends in Natural Resource Management

Discussion Topics. But what does counting tell us? Current Trends in Natural Resource Management Discussion Topics What are the outputs of natural resource management How do we measure what we produce What are the outputs of resource recreation management Ed Krumpe CSS 287 Behavioral approach to management

More information

FOREST SERVICE MANUAL NATIONAL HEADQUARTERS (WO) WASHINGTON, DC

FOREST SERVICE MANUAL NATIONAL HEADQUARTERS (WO) WASHINGTON, DC Page 1 of 77 FOREST SERVICE MANUAL NATIONAL HEADQUARTERS (WO) WASHINGTON, DC FSM 2300 RECREATION, WILDERNESS, AND RELATED RESOURCE MANAGEMENT CHAPTER TRAIL, RIVER, AND SIMILAR RECREATION OPPORTUNITIES

More information

National Forests and Grasslands in Texas

National Forests and Grasslands in Texas United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service National Forests and Grasslands in Texas Sam Houston NF 394 FM 1375 West New Waverly, Texas 77358 Phone 936-344-6205 Dear Friends, File Code: 1950

More information

Table of Contents. page 3 Long term Goals Project Scope Project History. 4 User Groups Defined Trail Representative Committee. 5 Trail Users Breakdown

Table of Contents. page 3 Long term Goals Project Scope Project History. 4 User Groups Defined Trail Representative Committee. 5 Trail Users Breakdown Launched April 27th, 2010 1 Table of Contents page 3 Long term Goals Project Scope Project History 4 User Groups Defined Trail Representative Committee 5 Trail Users Breakdown 13 Trail Users Desires 16

More information

Rule Governing the Designation and Establishment of All-Terrain Vehicle Use Trails on State Land

Rule Governing the Designation and Establishment of All-Terrain Vehicle Use Trails on State Land Rule Governing the Designation and Establishment of All-Terrain Vehicle Use Trails on State Land 1.0 Authority 1.1 This rule is promulgated pursuant to 23 V.S.A. 3506. Section 3506 (b)(4) states that an

More information

FINGER-TATUK PROVINCIAL PARK

FINGER-TATUK PROVINCIAL PARK FINGER-TATUK PROVINCIAL PARK PURPOSE STATEMENT AND ZONING PLAN March 2003 FINGER-TATUK PROVINCIAL PARK Purpose Statement and Zoning Plan Finger-Tatuk Provincial Park is 17,151 ha in size. It includes the

More information

--- FINAL --- Platte Petroleum Project RECREATION TECHNICAL REPORT. Prepared by:

--- FINAL --- Platte Petroleum Project RECREATION TECHNICAL REPORT. Prepared by: --- FINAL --- Platte Petroleum Project RECREATION TECHNICAL REPORT Prepared by: David S. Hatch Forest Landscape Architect and Recreation Planner Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest U.S. Forest Service

More information

Decision Memo Ice Age Trail Improvement (CRAC 37)

Decision Memo Ice Age Trail Improvement (CRAC 37) Decision Memo Ice Age Trail Improvement (CRAC 37) U.S. Forest Service Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest, Medford-Park Falls Ranger District Taylor County, Wisconsin T32N, R2W, Town of Grover, Section

More information

Understanding user expectations And planning for long term sustainability 1

Understanding user expectations And planning for long term sustainability 1 Understanding user expectations And planning for long term sustainability 1 What is a natural surface trail? It can be as simple has a mineral soil, mulched or graveled pathway, or as developed as elevated

More information

WASHINGTON STATE PARKS LAND CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM

WASHINGTON STATE PARKS LAND CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM WASHINGTON STATE PARKS LAND CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM Administrative Code Establishing Land Classification System WAC 352-16-020 Land classification system. State park areas are of statewide natural, cultural,

More information

Proposed Action. Payette National Forest Over-Snow Grooming in Valley, Adams and Idaho Counties. United States Department of Agriculture

Proposed Action. Payette National Forest Over-Snow Grooming in Valley, Adams and Idaho Counties. United States Department of Agriculture United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service January 2012 Proposed Action Payette National Forest Over-Snow Grooming in Valley, Adams and Idaho Counties Payette National Forest Valley, Adams

More information

Deer Creek. Forest Plan Special Designations and Inventoried Roadless Area Report. Prepared by: Dan Gilfillan North Zone Recreation Staff.

Deer Creek. Forest Plan Special Designations and Inventoried Roadless Area Report. Prepared by: Dan Gilfillan North Zone Recreation Staff. Forest Plan Special Designations and Inventoried Roadless Area Report Prepared by: Dan Gilfillan North Zone Recreation Staff For: Bonner Ferry Ranger District Idaho Panhandle National Forest 8/28/2015

More information

St. Joe Travel Management EA CULTURAL RESOURCES

St. Joe Travel Management EA CULTURAL RESOURCES St. Joe Travel Management EA CULTURAL RESOURCES Bruce Gibson May 2015 Regulatory Framework Forest Plan The Idaho Panhandle National Forests (IPNF) Forest Plan requires systematic cultural resource inventory

More information

Draft Record of Decision

Draft Record of Decision United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Draft Record of Decision Ochoco Summit Trail System Project and Forest Plan Amendments Ochoco National Forest Crook and Wheeler Counties September

More information

BUTTE COUNTY FOREST ADVISORY COMMITTEE

BUTTE COUNTY FOREST ADVISORY COMMITTEE BUTTE COUNTY FOREST ADVISORY COMMITTEE November 24, 2014-4:00 P.M. ITEM NO. 1.00 2.00 Call to order Golden Valley Bank, 190 Cohasset Rd. Chico, CA 95926 (park in center of lot) Pledge of allegiance to

More information

Special Recreation Management Areas Extensive Recreation Management Areas Public Lands Not Designated as Recreation Management Areas

Special Recreation Management Areas Extensive Recreation Management Areas Public Lands Not Designated as Recreation Management Areas From the Proposed RMP: Special Recreation Management Areas SRMAs are an administrative unit where the existing or proposed recreation opportunities and recreation setting characteristics are recognized

More information

RUSHMORE CONNECTOR TRAIL PROPOSAL

RUSHMORE CONNECTOR TRAIL PROPOSAL PURPOSE AND NEED Background The U.S. Forest Service, Black Hills National Forest (Forest Service) has received a special use permit application from the State of South Dakota Department of Game, Fish and

More information

Wilderness Areas Designated by the White Pine County bill

Wilderness Areas Designated by the White Pine County bill Wilderness Areas Designated by the White Pine County bill SEC. 321. SHORT TITLE. This subtitle may be cited as the `Pam White Wilderness Act of 2006'. SEC. 322. FINDINGS. Congress finds that-- The White

More information

Buffalo Pass Trails Project

Buffalo Pass Trails Project Buffalo Pass Trails Project Hahns Peak/Bears Ears Ranger District, Medicine Bow-Routt National Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland Routt County, Colorado T6N 83W Sections 3-5, 8; T6N 84W Sections

More information