UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF THE CAYMAN ISLANDS

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1 UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF THE CAYMAN ISLANDS COURSE TITLE: CAYMANIAN SOCIETY HISTORY COURSE DESCRIPTION: The course focuses on the history, economy, governmental structure and processes of culture and social structure of the Cayman Islands. With such a focus as the centre of attention, the course begins with the location of Caymanian Society within the larger West Indian complex. Certain key concepts e.g. frontier society, pigmentocracy ex-patriates and voluntary colonialism are introduced and defined and similarities to as well as differences other from West Indian territories are highlighted. Using these themes as a launching pad the lectures and assigned readings take cognizance of the major developments in Caymanian society. Equal interest will be displayed into the social, political and economic development of island society with the objective of demonstrating how the economic development which had its genesis in the remittances of the Caymanian seamen was later predicated upon a synergistic and symbiotic relationship between expatriate and Caymanian efforts. There will be an opportunity to explore the relationship between the administering power and the colony with a view to examining how such a relationship lacks certain basic elements of what is a truly democratic relationship. The course will end with an examination of the islands emergence as a major player on the international financial market and the implications this has for the future of Caymanian society. 2. FORMAT: The course meets for a 1 ½ hour lecture discussion twice per week (see course schedule). Lecture-discussions are held at the University College of the Cayman Islands on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 4:30 p.m. until 6:30 p.m. 1

2 3. ESSAY, ASSIGNMENTS, EXAMINATION AND GRADING Course participants will be required to do a research paper on a topic ordinarily based on a lecture or a theme relevant to course work. Such a paper or theme must be chosen in consultation with the course presenter. Please note: work will be accepted from students only if it is original in conception, organization and phasing and if it is specifically prepared for this course. All sources consulted in the preparation of the essay must be fully acknowledged (see Publication Manual of the APA). 4. GRADES FOR THE COURSE WILL BE DETERMINED ON THE FOLLOWING BASIS: Course Work & Class participation 20% Mid-Semester Exam 30% Final examination 50% 5. READING AND COURSE PREPARATION: Course participants are urged to read as fully as possible the selections prescribed for lectures. The reading lists associated with lectures will not be limited to the required texts. Participants are encouraged to keep current with their readings as this will enable full class participation and thus guarantee maximum marks for class preparation and participation as well as familiarity with lecture material. 2

3 6. REQUIRED TEXTS: There are two required texts for the course and these are as follows: Bodden, J.A. Roy The Cayman Islands in Transition: The Politics, History and Sociology of a Changing Society Ian Randle Publishers Kingston, Ja 2007 Craton, Michael and the New History Committee Founded Upon the Seas: A History of the Cayman Islands and Their People Ian Randle Publishers Kingston, Ja RECOMMENDED TEXTS The following are recommended for the Library s Browsing collection so as to provide additional reference sources. Barrow-Giles, Cynthia Introduction to Caribbean Politics Ian Randle Publishers Kingston, Ja 2002 pp. 15; pp ; pp Kieran, Brian L The Lawless Caymanas Brian Kieron Bournemouth 1992 Lewis, Gordon K. The Growth of the Modern West Indies Ian Randle Publishers Kingston, Ja

4 8. COURSE SCHEDULE: 1) The Cayman Islands in the Larger West Indian Complex Parts 1 & 2 The Cayman Islands in Transition: The Politics, History and Sociology of a Changing Society - Chapter 1 Founded upon the Seas - Chapters 1 thru 3 The Growth of the Modern West Indies - Chapter 2 1) The Legacy of Colonialism 2) The Cayman Islands as a Society with Slaves The Cayman Islands in Transition - pp Founded Upon the Seas - Chapters 4 thru 5 Recommended Reading: The Lawless Caymanas - Chapters 1 & 2 4

5 1) Slavery and its Aftermath 2) The Caymanian Diaspora The Cayman Islands in Transition - pp Founded upon the Seas - pp & pp ) The Frontier Society ) The First Commissioners Founded Upon the Seas - pp and pp ) The Islands Time Forgot ) The Emergence of Caymanian Society Founded Upon the Seas - pp and pp

6 1) Ethnicity, Race and Class in Caymanian Society 2) The Islands Time Forgot The Cayman Islands in Transition - pp Founded Upon the Seas - pp ) Commissioner Cardinall and the Changing Caymanian Society 2) The Challenges of Modernity Founded Upon the seas - pp (some repetitive reading) 1) World War II and it s Aftermath 2) Andrew Morris Gerrard and the New Caymanian Society The Growth of the Modern West Indies - pp

7 1) Politics, Parties and Populism Parts Founded Upon the Seas - pp The Growth of the Modern West Indies - pp LECTURES 1) Federation, Fractiousness and Failure 2) The Politics of Change The Growth of the Modern West Indies - pp The Cayman Islands in Transition - pp LECTURES: 1) The Black Ball - White Ball Confusion 2) The Cayman Islands and Voluntary Colonialism The Cayman Islands In Transition - pp Introduction to Caribbean Politics - pp

8 1) 1959 and the New Constitution 2) The Struggle for Universal Adult Suffrage and Women s Rights To be provided 1) Voluntary Colonialism and Constitutional Modernization 1971 to Present The Oxford and Asquith Report; the Smith and Wallace Report and the Draft Constitution 1992, the Ebanks, Ebanks and Hunter Report 2001 The Cayman Islands in Transition - Chapter 3 1) From Frontier Society to International Financial Centre Part 1 & Part 2 The Cayman Islands in Transition - Chapter 5 Founded Upon the Seas - Chapter 15 8

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