General Considerations For Cross Country Orienteering Courses: Design and Set Guidelines

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "General Considerations For Cross Country Orienteering Courses: Design and Set Guidelines"

Transcription

1 General Considerations For Cross Country Orienteering Courses: Design and Set Guidelines Objective Orienteering's slogan is that it is "the thinking sport." Doing well requires a combination of physical and mental skills. These skills are put to the test by the course setter, working in the framework of the given map and terrain. It is nearly impossible to set a course that does not offer a good physical test, providing that it is of the proper length; the challenge for the course setter is to offer a mental test appropriate to the skill level of those for whom the course is intended. Skill not Luck You are setting the course for an orienteer, not a surveyor, so the feature you use must be distinct. You should avoid such control sites as "the middle of the marsh" (unless it is a very small marsh) or "the hillside because they introduce too much of an element of luck into the competition. The competitor should be able to orienteer directly to the control if he is skillful, and not have to count on finding it by using a systematic search (he may end up doing that anyway, but he should not have to). Your features for control sites can be small, but they must be distinct. A contour line might have a gradual bend in it that could be called a spur (or reentrant) but it may be hard out in the woods to tell just where the spur or reentrant is. In general, avoid dense areas for controls, especially if the terrain is somewhat vague. Again, it is a matter of what is fair; are you requiring skill or luck? Finding a control point (for example, a pit) in the middle of a large, flat, dense area places too great a premium on luck, even if the point itself (for example, a pit) is distinct. Dense areas may be okay if the terrain is well defined. Start-Finish Location Good terrain for White and Yellow courses with plenty of linear features often dictates where the Start will be. Most competitors like to have the Finish/Competition Center as close to the parking as possible. Moving the Start to a higher elevation can reduce climb on the courses. Almost without exception, the ideal location for the White course, because of its length, dictates or constrains the Start area for all courses. The practice of having separate Start areas for one or more of the lower courses should be discouraged. Herding beginners and youngsters to a separate competitive area is detrimental to development as a whole, both of the individual and of the sport. The mix of competitors of widely different ages and skill levels epitomizes the fun and vitality of orienteering. Avoid Doglegs Leaving a control, there should not be a logical route that doubles back through the same area from which the control was approached. Why? Because competitor A may have competitor B just behind him, so that A reveals the location of the control as he is leaving it, thereby helping B. Since some competitors may be luckier than others it is at least potentially unfair. Doglegs may be obvious or not so obvious. For example, the best route to a control may be along the base of a hill to a reentrant and then continue along the base of the hill. This route creates a dogleg into the reentrant, even though the straight lines you use to connect the points on the map do not show this. To avoid doglegs, you can put in a short leg to 300 meters long -- to move the competitor away from the previous control to the start of another long leg. A similar problem can occur if you use the same control on more than one course, if runners on one course leave the control in the direction from which the people on the other course are arriving. Avoid this situation as well. Under some conditions, it may be necessary to have a dogleg on a White course in order to have clarity. While not desirable, a dogleg on White is preferable to a course that is confusing or too difficult.

2 Avoid Dangerous Areas Avoid including dangerous areas such as cliffs with poor visibility, sink holes, large areas of poison ivy or poison oak, or deep swamps. Remember, a White or Yellow runner may go into these areas accidentally, while a Red or Blue runner may be tempted to try a dangerous short cut. Controls on Similar Features Have no less than 60 meters distance between any two controls on different courses if the features are similar enough to be confused at all and no less than 30 meters between any two controls on different courses regardless of the feature. For Sprint courses (on 1:5000 or 1:4000 maps) the minimum control spacing is 30 meters on similar features and 15 meters regardless of the feature. Optimum Route and Climb Determine the "optimum route" that an orienteer would take on all of your courses. Measure its length in meters with the edge of a piece of paper or a string. Then count how many contour lines this route crosses going uphill. Multiply this number of contour lines by the contour interval in meters. This "climb" should normally not exceed 4% of the optimum route distance. For example, a 6.7km Red course with an optimum distance of 7.5km should normally not have over 300 meters of climb. If it does, change your course so that there is less climb. Try a design that offers contouring along hillsides as the optimal route. A longer walk to get to a higher Start area can also help. Split Courses If for some reason you are having multiple courses for any level, try to make them very similar in length, climb and number of controls. The first control must not be the same for any two courses. Course Purpose For the design of the less difficult courses, it is important to be mindful of three overriding considerations which distinguish these courses from the advanced courses (Brown, Green, Red and Blue): 1. While as a general rule the advanced courses each should be designed to be as technically difficult as terrain and map permit (and of equal technical difficulty), each of the lower courses -- White, Yellow and Orange -- must be designed to fit a distinct range of technical difficulty. 2. Because each of the lower courses is an A level or championship course for certain classes, the correct design of such courses is just as important as that of the advanced. 3. Because beginners and developing orienteers spend at least a season or two (usually longer) running the lower courses, it is especially important to the development and success of the sport that these courses be well designed.

3 White Course Winning time: Sprint min, Middle min, Long min, Classic min. The White course should be designed for people who may have no orienteering experience and have had perhaps 15 minutes of instruction before setting out. While it is the championship course for M-12 and F-12, the major complaints about White courses have been that they were too difficult. A White course must be designed in a section of the map which has an appropriate sequence of linear features, where the mapping is absolutely accurate and where, preferably, there is an interesting variety of topographic features. An ideal example would be a small lake, which can be circumnavigated without fear of losing one's way and with the expectation of a good trail system and interesting features. Usually the area of the map having the most trails is best for White course location. 1. An Easy Start. Make the first two or three points particularly easy. This allows the competitor to get familiar with the map and keeps him from getting discouraged from the very beginning. The first control should be as simple as possible -- in fact; it can even be visible from the starting point. 2. Linear Features. Generally, the terrain you use for a White course should be "friendly," with lots of good handrails, no excessively rugged features, etc. Keep every leg along well-marked trails or a similar linear feature such as a road, a stone wall, a field edge, a stream or the like (trails are much preferred, however). 3. Short Legs. Generally the legs should be kept fairly short -- certainly no more than 400 meters. It is better to have six to eight short legs than three or four long ones. On the other hand, don't use twenty legs each 100 meters long. 4. Large features for control points. Make the difficulty of the control fit the course. Use large, obvious features -- top of a big, distinct hill, rather than the backside of a three-meter knoll; a trail junction rather than a reentrant. Rarely, therefore, will a control be suitable for both the White course and the Orange course. 5. Avoid vague and dense areas. As with any course, the features you choose for control sites must be distinct; even large features can be vague, as for example the top of a large flat-topped hill. Also, if you pick precise spots, you will get fewer comments about controls being a little bit off. Never put a White control in a dense area. 6. Very simple route choices. It is not necessary to have a route choice on a White course, but sometimes it is nice to offer a little toward the end. The options should be rather simple. Remember, people on the White course may take routes that you would never dream of! A good example would be a leg having a long, safe route (e.g., along a trail) and a shortcut (through woods, along a stream, etc.), provided there is no danger of getting seriously lost. Such a design introduces some elementary navigation factors and adds challenge and variety. If necessary, a leg can be run through the woods guided by streamers, but this should be used only in exceptional circumstances where needed to optimize distance due to lack of linear features. 7. No Use of Compass. Avoid directions or features that require the use of a compass. A White course should be able to be completed without having to use a compass. Yellow Course Winning time: Sprint min, Middle min, Long min, Classic min. The Yellow course is designed for males or females who are 13 to 14 years old and for older orienteers who are relatively new to the sport. It offers the beginning orienteer an initial experience with the application of orienteering techniques, and the course designer should make an effort to involve as many fundamental skills as possible -- compass, map reading, distance measurement and pace: 1. Basic Design. Just as with White, it is critical that the Yellow course be set in an area having well-mapped, clear features. It is vital to appreciate that, in several senses, the basic difference from White is that Yellow takes the runner from the trail into the woods. While trails can be used for a route on a Yellow leg, an off-trail route should also be available for the same leg. 2. Easy Start. Make the first two or three controls relatively easy so that the competitor may become familiar with the map. 3. Easy Course. Yellow should still be an easy course. The technical difficulty for Yellow is confined to a rather narrow range whose objective is accomplished by the use of a handrail for much of each leg's length, with a catching

4 feature near each control (within 25-50m). The best Yellow legs are along handrails such as streams, ridges, and vegetation boundaries or stone walls. 4. Variety of lengths of legs. Vary the lengths of the legs, but tend toward keeping them short. The maximum length should be about 600 meters. Legs should be longer than for White; usually meters is good for Yellow. 5. Large features for control points. Use large features within visual distance and rather obvious features, such as a large boulder near a trail junction, on top of a hill, north side of pond. When a point feature is used, it should be within visual distance of a large feature. 6. Route Choice. As with White, again some challenge can be used by shortcuts through open woods, but only if the distance is relatively short (up to 200m, at most), and provided a catching feature exists. And even in such cases, a longer "safe" route should also exist. 7. Control placement. Put each control on or just after an obvious collecting feature. If the control is not on a collecting feature, put it within 100 meters of one, preferably just after it. 8. Catching Features. If a control is not on a collecting feature, a catching feature must be within 100 meters after the control. 9. Avoidance of Dense Areas. Never put a Yellow control inside of a dense area. 10. Limited Use of Compass. A Yellow course should be able to be completed with minimal the use of precision compass. A leg where use of a compass could result in a faster route is appropriate; however, that leg should have a reasonable route where a compass is not required. 11. Shared Controls. The practice of sharing a leg or control with White or Orange should be avoided, especially if a large turnout is expected. Because each of the three lower courses has a discrete range of technical difficulty, overlaps invariably cause compromise with correct standards. Orange Course Winning time Sprint min, Middle min, Long min, Classic min.. 1. Moderately but not extremely difficult navigation. The controls and best routes should invite the intermediate orienteer away from strong collecting features (roads, trails) that the beginners must rely on. However, the penalty for navigational errors should not be extreme. An Orange control may be placed in an area of intricate small features, but only if there is at least one good attack point nearby (preferably several) to help the competitors find it, and also a catching feature nearby to which they can "bail out" if they become confused. 2. Route Choice. Set a course that forces the orienteer to make decisions constantly. Make sure that the competitor must continue to pay attention and think in order to execute his choice properly -- it should not be, for example, just a matter of choosing which one of two main roads to follow for one kilometer. The best Orange legs require, and reward, constant navigation. Handrails should be more suitable than for Yellow -- e.g., a long, broad reentrant. Rather, the runner should pick off point markers (cliffs, boulders, knolls, marshes, etc.) as he proceeds along his chosen route. A trail -- or a road -- run should seldom be the best choice. 3. Variety. For variety, easy legs near Yellow in difficulty should be mixed with challenging, more advanced; in addition, a mix of short ( m) and longer ( m) legs is desirable. It is important that the whole course contains as much variety as feasible. This variety should also cover control features, direction, route choice and navigational problems. 4. Control Features. The control feature should be fairly prominent, unless a good attack point and catching features are nearby. The Orange runner should be forced to use all of his orienteering skills in the overall course. 5. The fastest time appropriate to the format. Keep in mind that some very skillful runners will be on Orange: so the course must not be too easy. A typical mistake is failure to reduce length due to climb, difficult footing (rocks) and slow run (fight). 6. Precision Compass, Measure and Pace. Legs requiring nothing but precision compass, measure and pace should be limited to one or two. 7. Difficult Controls. Difficult controls may be used, but a good attack point should be within 50 to 200 meters.

5 Brown, Green, Red and Blue Courses Winning times: Brown: Sprint min, Middle min, Long min, Classic min. Green: Sprint min, Middle min, Long min, Classic min. Red (except F21): Sprint min, Middle min, Long min, Classic min. Red (F21): Sprint min, Middle min, Long min, Classic min. Blue: Sprint min, Middle min, Long min, Classic min. The advanced courses should be set so that the very experienced orienteer is well challenged. The element of luck should be eliminated if possible. The Brown, Green, Red and Blue courses all should be of the same technical level -- difficult. General requirements are the same; however, special consideration noted at the end of this section is required for Brown. 1. Start. Choose the Start for Brown, Green, Red and Blue courses with regard to proximity to a good White/Yellow course area with lots of trails and linear features. In hilly areas, place the Start at a high elevation to help minimize unnecessary climb on the courses. 2. Course Length. Try to keep your course length reasonable, especially on hilly courses or in thick vegetation, to meet these times. Remember that it is expected winning time which is decisive in determining course length. Try not to over set courses. [Use previous course results if available and talk to previous competitors who have used this terrain to gage length and climb.] 3. Control Feature Size. Avoid large features, which are usually very easy to find such that the competitor does not need to use precision skills. Too big a feature might be the top of a large hill, the edge of a large clearing, a point along a trail or stream (if there are any confusing trails or streams, this could be okay), etc. In fact, having a control within meters of a big feature is probably too easy as well. Use small features -- boulders, cliffs, small reentrants, spurs and knolls, small marshes, depressions, etc. 4. Controls too close to attack points. Placing a control soon after a collecting feature, for example, 100 meters after a road, will usually make it too easy to find even if the feature is small. Furthermore, the competitor will probably be able to run to the road without thinking, making the leg too easy. Instead, place the control some 200 meters before the road. That way the less skilled orienteer will have to cover the extra 400 meters if he must use the road to find his bearings. Collecting features are long features lying across the competitor's direction of travel, such as roads, large trails, streams, ridges, clearings, large marshes, etc. Concentrate on this: if the competitor uses them to make his route or his navigation easier, make him travel farther out of his way. Don't make the direct route the easier route. 5. Lost Kilometers. Any parts of a course that require little or no thinking, merely physical effort, should be avoided as much as possible. If a control is on top of a large hill, the leg becomes a hill-climb event instead of an orienteering event. If the control is placed right after a big collecting feature, the competitor can turn off his mind until he reaches the feature. If the best route is along a trail for several hundred meters, again the leg becomes a racing event requiring little or no thinking. 6. Handrails. Try to avoid having the routes parallel to obvious linear features such as roads, trails, streams, fences or power lines. To prevent a parallel route from simplifying the leg significantly keep such features more nearly perpendicular to your route unless the linear feature network is complex. 7. Catching Features. Advanced courses should not have controls placed too close to catching features. Controls should not be located beyond a catching feature; rather, any catching feature should be at least 200 meters beyond a control. 8. Climb. Climb should normally not exceed 4%. See "Optimum Route" on the second page for computation method. 9. Long Legs. For Classic/Long courses, include at least one long leg (~600 meters on Brown and 800 meters or greater for the longer advanced courses). Courses should include multiple long legs if the terrain allows it. 10. Route Choice. Maximize route choice and navigation difficulties while minimizing the luck element and the lost/dead kilometers. The navigationally challenging route should be faster for those with good woods running skills than the "easy way around." 11. Variety. A good course offers variety in both controls and routes. The larger the number and the greater variety of O-tests built into a course, the greater the chance that luck is eliminated and the orienteer with the best ability wins. 12. Brown Course. Some orienteers on this course may have some vision problems and only limited leg strength. The climb should be closer to 3%, at most 4%. Tough and dangerous areas must be avoided. While it must be less demanding physically, the Brown course should require the maximum in orienteering skills. Since vision may be a major problem for the older orienteer, try to keep controls out of areas that have much fine detail on the map so that finding the control is by skill rather than luck.

6 USOF Cross-Country Orienteering Course Setting Guidelines Control Flag Placement It is fair, and often desirable, to block the view of the control flag by a mapped feature, especially where it is the control feature, such as a cliff, boulder, etc. But, be sure the feature is appropriately visible. It is hard to improve upon a control on the far side of a knoll, seen first as the runner reaches the crest or comes around the side. On the other hand, nothing is worse than a control flag hidden behind a tree, log, bush or other unmapped obstruction, which punishes all but the lucky few who stumble upon it. It is required to place controls from different courses at least 30 meters apart regardless of the control feature. Hidden Controls The only reason we hang a flag is to help competitors find the find the punch or marking device. A non-mapped feature for any course should never hide control flags. It is extremely frustrating for the orienteer to navigate a leg properly only to lose time searching for a hidden flag. Likewise, it is just as frustrating to reach for a marker or punch and find that it is attached to something other than the flag or stand near the flag. We call that hidden in plain sight. Remember, unless the control description clearly implies otherwise, every control flag should be equally visible from all directions. Despite the consideration that the feature, not the flag, should be seen first, do not hide flags, especially in pits. Do not place the control against the side of the pit in the bottom because it may be hidden from certain approaches. If you use a pit, place the control in the middle so that it is visible from all approaches. White and Yellow Control flags should usually be visible from the trail or road used to navigate. If not, locate the control at such a feature, but be sure it (the feature or even the control flag) can be seen from the trail. Make sure that there are no similar features nearby to confuse the competitor. Flags for White courses should be hung higher than on advanced courses. Flags on Yellow courses can be lower; approximately waist-high on an adult. Remember that the participants on White and Yellow may be children, so place flags and markers at a height which they can see and reach. Orange Orange controls should be hung just above the knee of an adult. Brown, Green, Red and Blue For all of these courses, the control feature should be seen first and then the flag. Flags should be hung just below the knee. Make the competitor orienteer to the feature first. If he is coming from the South, for example, place the control flag on the North side of a knoll or boulder. The flag should always be fully open when hung, not folded on the ground. In no case should the control be hung with any part of the bag resting on the ground. Err on the side of visibility. If you have to build something to gain the placement you desire (such as laying a stick across a pit to hang the control on) do not hesitate to make a small construction out of available materials. It pays to have a good imagination. Field Check (Vetting) You must check the planned control locations out in the field. Many control locations that look good on the map are unsuitable due to map problems. An alternate control can usually be found only a short distance away, so that the leg can remain intact. White courses For White Courses, be sure to check the other courses to ensure that there are no nearby controls from them which may confuse the White course runners.

Below is an example of a well laid-out template of a route card used by the Sionnach Team which is a good format to begin with.

Below is an example of a well laid-out template of a route card used by the Sionnach Team which is a good format to begin with. Route Card A route card is used as a navigational aid to hill walkers by setting out a step by step plan for an intended hike. It is good practice to make out a route card before every hike you or your

More information

Orienteering. Requirement 1: First Aid. Requirement 1: First Aid. Requirement 1: First Aid. Class Notes /3/2014

Orienteering. Requirement 1: First Aid. Requirement 1: First Aid. Requirement 1: First Aid. Class Notes /3/2014 Orienteering Class Notes 2014 Cuts and scratches: stop the bleeding, clean the wound, apply antibiotic, cover the wound, get stiches if the wound is deep, watch for infection. Copperhead Rattlesnake Blisters:

More information

LAKE NEEDWOOD ORIENTEERING MEET QUANTICO ORIENTEERING CLUB SEPTEMBER 18, 2011

LAKE NEEDWOOD ORIENTEERING MEET QUANTICO ORIENTEERING CLUB SEPTEMBER 18, 2011 NATIONAL ORIENTEERING DAY LAKE NEEDWOOD ORIENTEERING MEET QUANTICO ORIENTEERING CLUB SEPTEMBER 18, 2011 COMBINED EVENT NOTES, including: National Orienteering Day Course Designer s Notes Super String-O

More information

The Atlas of Hillforts of Britain and Ireland. Hillfort survey notes for guidance

The Atlas of Hillforts of Britain and Ireland. Hillfort survey notes for guidance The Atlas of Hillforts of Britain and Ireland Hillfort survey notes for guidance The collection of surveys for the Atlas is now finished but you can use this form and the accompanying Notes for Guidance

More information

4.1 Landforms. Note: dimensions are specified in mm at the scale of 1: All drawings are at 1:7 500 for clarity only.

4.1 Landforms. Note: dimensions are specified in mm at the scale of 1: All drawings are at 1:7 500 for clarity only. 4.1 Landforms Note: dimensions are specified in mm at the scale of 1:15 000. All drawings are at 1:7 500 for clarity only. OM = Outside measure IM = Inside measure CC = Centre to centre 0.2 0.4 OM 0.4

More information

Introduction to Topographic Maps

Introduction to Topographic Maps Introduction to Topographic Maps DIRECTIONS: Read all of the following content. READ EVERYTHING!! At the end of the packet, you will find two topographic maps. Your task is to indentify each of the elevations

More information

Hiking. Lesson 4.1. Fitness. Hiking

Hiking. Lesson 4.1. Fitness. Hiking Lesson 4.1 By Carone Fitness If you enjoy walking, you will probably enjoy hiking. The main difference between hiking and fitness walking is the change in terrain. is typically done in a forest, wilderness,

More information

Kirigalpoththa Nature Trail Horton Plains National Park

Kirigalpoththa Nature Trail Horton Plains National Park Kirigalpoththa Nature Trail Horton Plains National Park Trail Difficulty: Easy Moderate Strenuous Tough Trail Head: Horton Plains Visitor Centre Nearest Town: Pattipola Nearest City: Nanu-Oya Access to

More information

White Horse. For your own safety warn the MCA Coastguard Helicopter (01305) They have been known to low fly in this area

White Horse. For your own safety warn the MCA Coastguard Helicopter (01305) They have been known to low fly in this area Site Code 2.078 OS Grid Ref: SY 715 844 (Map 194) GPS: N50:39.514 Owned and farmed by: Nearest Phone: Casualty Units: W2:24:273 P & J Critchell Farm Osmington 01305 834314 Broadmayne or Sutton Poyntz County

More information

Looking back across Emerald Lake at Wapta Mountain (on the left) and Mount Burgess (on the right):

Looking back across Emerald Lake at Wapta Mountain (on the left) and Mount Burgess (on the right): YOHO LAKE FROM EMERALD LAKE, YOHO NATIONAL PARK, BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA We decided to hike to Yoho Lake from Emerald Lake even though the distance is longer than the trail from Takakkaw Falls (about

More information

MAPPING OF ROCK FEATURES 2.9

MAPPING OF ROCK FEATURES 2.9 MAPPING OF ROCK FEATURES 2.9 Introduction 1 The mapping of rock in recent years has been one of the strengths of orienteering in Australia. This has been largely because our granite terrain has presented

More information

International Specification for Control Descriptions

International Specification for Control Descriptions International Specification for Control Descriptions INTERNATIONAL ORIENTEERING FEDERATION 2018 INTERNATIONAL ORIENTEERING FEDERATION International Orienteering Federation Drottninggatan 47, 3 1/2 tr.

More information

CRAZY HORSE TRAIL GUIDE

CRAZY HORSE TRAIL GUIDE CRAZY HORSE TRAIL GUIDE Abridged Version: July 2016 This is a short form of our interpretive trail guide for the Crazy Horse Trail. The full version of the guide has a more detailed description of the

More information

INTERNATIONAL ORIENTEERING FEDERATION 2010

INTERNATIONAL ORIENTEERING FEDERATION 2010 INTERNATIONAL ORIENTEERING FEDERATION 2010 Valid from 15 May 2010 1 INTRODUCTION Orienteering is a world-wide sport. A common approach to the interpretation and drawing of orienteering maps is essential

More information

HIKING IN THE CANADIAN ROCKIES

HIKING IN THE CANADIAN ROCKIES HIKING IN THE CANADIAN ROCKIES Distance Time Elevation y MORAINE LAKE TRAILS THE ROCKPILE 0.8 km (0.5 mi) 20 min 30 m (98 ft) Located adjacent to the Lodge, the short interpretive trail up the Rock Pile

More information

TROOP 22 TOTIN' CHIP REQUIREMENTS

TROOP 22 TOTIN' CHIP REQUIREMENTS TROOP 22 TOTIN' CHIP REQUIREMENTS References: Boy Scout Handbook, 11th Ed. pp. 77-85 and 218-219; Boy Scout Handbook, 10th Ed. pp. 63-76 (superior to 11th Ed. but still deficient); Boy Scout Handbook,

More information

A Step By Step Instructional Guide

A Step By Step Instructional Guide A Step By Step Instructional Guide Paracord Survival Bracelet Table of Contents iii Table of Contents Table of Contents... iii Introduction... vii 1 History and Useful Information... 3 1.1 History of Paracord...

More information

CMC Member Guide to the CMC Website

CMC Member Guide to the CMC Website CMC Member Guide to the CMC Website HOW TO: Sign Up or Cancel a Trip/Event/Class Change Your Personal Information PLUS HOW TO FIND: Renew Your Membership Trip classification information Denver Group Classification

More information

Design Considerations For Accessible Parks & Trails

Design Considerations For Accessible Parks & Trails Design Considerations For Accessible Parks & Trails Measuring Up: Campbell River 2008 Dave Calver Consulting City of Campbell River Legacies Now: Measuring Up Design Guidelines Design Considerations for

More information

Lab Skills: Introduction to the Air Track

Lab Skills: Introduction to the Air Track Lab Skills: Introduction to the Air Track 1 What is an air track? An air track is an experimental apparatus that allows the study of motion with minimal interference by frictional forces. It consist of

More information

Snowmobile GUIDELINES FOR TRAIL SIGNING

Snowmobile GUIDELINES FOR TRAIL SIGNING STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE BUREAU OF TRAILS Snowmobile GUIDELINES FOR TRAIL SIGNING TRAIL FUNDED BY REGISTRATION FEES Table of Contents Introduction... Some Things to Take Into Consideration... BOT Provided

More information

Route Combo) Mt. Bierstadt - Bierstadt, Sawtooth, Evans

Route Combo) Mt. Bierstadt - Bierstadt, Sawtooth, Evans Climbing 14ers can be very dangerous, please read the Mountaineering Safety Page and make sure you have a map+compass and can use them effectively, without the help of electronic devices. Route Combo)

More information

AIRMAN S INFORMATION MANUAL. Enroute

AIRMAN S INFORMATION MANUAL. Enroute AIRMAN S INFORMATION MANUAL AIM 52 AIRPORT LIGHTING AND MARKING AIDS Airport Beacons Operation of the airport rotating beacon during the daytime indicates the weather in the Class D airspace is below basic

More information

Chapter 7 Geography and the Early Settlement of Egypt, Kush, and Canaan

Chapter 7 Geography and the Early Settlement of Egypt, Kush, and Canaan Chapter 7 Geography and the Early Settlement of Egypt, Kush, and Canaan How did geography affect early settlement in Egypt, Kush, and Canaan? Section 7.1 - Introduction RF/NASA//Corbis This satellite photograph

More information

Glacial Geomorphology Exercise

Glacial Geomorphology Exercise James Madison University Field Course in western Ireland Glacial Geomorphology Exercise 3-day road log (abbreviated) Striations Large kame terrace Cirque with moraines Kame delta Striations Eskers Raised

More information

Witte Museum Tour Painted Shelter on the Rio Grande River Saturday June 2, :30 A.M. 3:00 P.M.

Witte Museum Tour Painted Shelter on the Rio Grande River Saturday June 2, :30 A.M. 3:00 P.M. Witte Museum Tour Painted Shelter on the Rio Grande River Saturday June 2, 2018 9:30 A.M. 3:00 P.M. This tour is limited to 35 participants (Ages 12 and up) All minors must be accompanied by a parent or

More information

The Mountains are for Everyone. Hillwalking Adventure Skill General Guidance Stages 1 to 9

The Mountains are for Everyone. Hillwalking Adventure Skill General Guidance Stages 1 to 9 The Mountains are for Everyone Hillwalking Adventure Skill General Guidance Stages 1 to 9 Hill Walking Adventure Skills Key Elements Part of the Larger ONE programme roll out A 9 Stage Scheme from first

More information

Skiing and Snowshoes on Un-groomed Fernan Saddle Terrain

Skiing and Snowshoes on Un-groomed Fernan Saddle Terrain Skiing and Snowshoes on Un-groomed Fernan Saddle Terrain Three ski or snowshoe routes are available from the Fernan Saddle Parking Lot which either do not cover routes ordinarily groomed for snow machine

More information

Rapid Deployable System (RDS)

Rapid Deployable System (RDS) Rapid Deployable System (RDS) The deployable system utilized by the RDS is based on structural/mechanical principles that deliver measurable improvement over existing deployable tent systems. 2014 Johnson

More information

CHAPTER 5 SEPARATION METHODS AND MINIMA

CHAPTER 5 SEPARATION METHODS AND MINIMA CHAPTER 5 SEPARATION METHODS AND MINIMA 5.1 Provision for the separation of controlled traffic 5.1.1 Vertical or horizontal separation shall be provided: a) between IFR flights in Class D and E airspaces

More information

WHITTLING CHIP CLASS I. Session 1

WHITTLING CHIP CLASS I. Session 1 WHITTLING CHIP CLASS I. Session 1 A. Overview 1. Review today s session. 2. Review the next two sessions. B. Whittling Chip card 1. Show Whittling Chip card and pass it around. 2. Explain what the card

More information

ICAO Recommended Airport Signs, Runway And Taxiway Markings. COPYRIGHT JEPPESEN SANDERSON, INC., ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Revision Date:

ICAO Recommended Airport Signs, Runway And Taxiway Markings. COPYRIGHT JEPPESEN SANDERSON, INC., ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Revision Date: ICAO Recommended Airport Signs, Runway And Taxiway Markings Revision Date: 20051230 MANDATORY INSTRUCTION SIGNS A mandatory instruction sign identifies a location beyond which an aircraft taxiing shall

More information

Balloon Federation of America Pilot Achievement Award Program

Balloon Federation of America Pilot Achievement Award Program Balloon Federation of America Pilot Achievement Award Program 2000 3 rd revision (with 2001 Revisions) This program was developed by the BFA Events Committee in 1982 for the purpose of advancing the sport

More information

Route #1) Mt. of the Holy Cross - North Ridge

Route #1) Mt. of the Holy Cross - North Ridge Climbing 14ers can be very dangerous, please read the Mountaineering Safety Page and make sure you have a map+compass and can use them effectively, without the help of electronic devices. Route #1) Mt.

More information

Lordenshaw. What are cup & ring marks?

Lordenshaw. What are cup & ring marks? Lordenshaw Lordenshaw hill has one of the largest clusters of ancient cup and ring marked stones in the UK. We ve chosen four interesting spots we d like to share with you. What are cup & ring marks? The

More information

Kakadu Highlights No. 9: September 23 - October 6, 2018

Kakadu Highlights No. 9: September 23 - October 6, 2018 Kakadu Highlights No. 9: September 23 - October 6, 2018 Section 1: Barramundi Creek: September 23-26 We begin with a four to six hour, 350 kilometre drive from Darwin. The last 45 kilometres is on a 4WD

More information

Pricing Challenges: epods and Reality

Pricing Challenges: epods and Reality Pricing Challenges: epods and Reality Dr. Peter P. Belobaba 16.75J/1.234J Airline Management May 8, 2006 1 PODS: Passenger Choice of Path/Fare Given passenger type, randomly pick for each passenger generated:

More information

A Good Trail A good trail is one that everyone enjoys: the hare; the pack; everyone.

A Good Trail A good trail is one that everyone enjoys: the hare; the pack; everyone. Geneva Hash Trail Guide for Hares page 1 of 7 August 2001 A Good Trail A good trail is one that everyone enjoys: the hare; the pack; everyone. A good trail is also a battle of wits between the hare (who

More information

Using Cuisenaire Rods. Geometry & Measurement

Using Cuisenaire Rods. Geometry & Measurement Using Cuisenaire Rods Geometry & Measurement Table of Contents Introduction Exploring ith Cuisenaire Rods 2 Ho Lessons Are Organized 4 Using the Activities 6 Lessons Cover the Camel Counting, Area, Spatial

More information

FEASIBILITY CRITERIA

FEASIBILITY CRITERIA This chapter describes the methodology and criteria used to evaluate the feasibility of developing trails throughout the study areas. Land availability, habitat sensitivity, roadway crossings and on-street

More information

Appendix B Ultimate Airport Capacity and Delay Simulation Modeling Analysis

Appendix B Ultimate Airport Capacity and Delay Simulation Modeling Analysis Appendix B ULTIMATE AIRPORT CAPACITY & DELAY SIMULATION MODELING ANALYSIS B TABLE OF CONTENTS EXHIBITS TABLES B.1 Introduction... 1 B.2 Simulation Modeling Assumption and Methodology... 4 B.2.1 Runway

More information

Your Bees Are About To Arrive Are You Ready? February 2017

Your Bees Are About To Arrive Are You Ready? February 2017 Your Bees Are About To Arrive Are You Ready? (And, For Those Existing Hives, Are Your Ready For Spring?) February 2017 Micky Cross Co-First Vice President OVERVIEW Hive Location Hive Set Up Receiving Bees

More information

LFMN / Nice Côte-d Azur / NCE

LFMN / Nice Côte-d Azur / NCE This page is intended to draw commercial and private pilots attention to the aeronautical context and main threats related to an aerodrome. They have been identified in a collaborative way by the main

More information

CHAPTER 12: AERONAUTICAL CHARTS AND NAVIGATION

CHAPTER 12: AERONAUTICAL CHARTS AND NAVIGATION CHAPTER 12: AERONAUTICAL CHARTS AND NAVIGATION Once you start to venture out from your home gliderport, you need to be able to figure out where you are and how to get where you want to go. Aeronautical

More information

SECTION 4 - APPROACH CONTROL PROCEDURES

SECTION 4 - APPROACH CONTROL PROCEDURES SECTION 4 - APPROACH CONTROL PROCEDURES CHAPTER 1 - PROVISION OF SERVICES 1.1 An approach control unit shall provide:- a) Approach control service. b) Flight Information service. c) Alerting service. RESPONSIBILITIES

More information

Hiking Las Vegas.com

Hiking Las Vegas.com Hike: Mt. Wilson via First Creek Canyon route Trailhead: First Creek marked Distance: 10 miles up and back Elevation gain: 3,400 feet Elevation of Peak: 7,070 feet Time: 7 to 9 hours (up and back) Difficulty:

More information

Mandolin Slicer Quite possibly the safest mandolin in the world

Mandolin Slicer Quite possibly the safest mandolin in the world Mandolin Slicer Quite possibly the safest mandolin in the world MANDOLIN & COMPONENTS Handle Upper Plate Safe Hands Food Holder Non-Slip Retractable Leg Julianne Blades (3 sizes) Waffle / Crinkle Cut Blade

More information

Campfire. I. Preparation Before Activity

Campfire. I. Preparation Before Activity Campfire December 2010 Concepts: 1. The origin of the campfire is unknown; however, it has been used throughout human history as a means of warmth, light, social gathering, and entertainment. 2. Participating

More information

1 Definition of CIVL Competition Class gliders

1 Definition of CIVL Competition Class gliders CIVL 2014 PLENARY ANNEX 18A PARAGLIDING COMMITTEE S PROPOSALS 1 Definition of CIVL Competition Class gliders The 2013 Plenary implemented that "from 1st of January 2015, paragliders permitted to fly in

More information

Lava Mountain Trail Distance: Elevation Range: Trail Type: Difficulty: Season: Driving Distance: Driving Time: USGS Maps: Pros Cons

Lava Mountain Trail Distance: Elevation Range: Trail Type: Difficulty: Season: Driving Distance: Driving Time: USGS Maps: Pros Cons Lava Mountain Trail Distance: 13.4 miles (including the side trip to North Star Lake) Elevation Range: 5900'-8330' Trail Type: singletrack Difficulty: moderate Season: late June-October Driving Distance:

More information

ADOPT-A-TRAIL MANUAL C. Bailey-May

ADOPT-A-TRAIL MANUAL C. Bailey-May ADOPT-A-TRAIL MANUAL C. Bailey-May 2011 1 ADOPT-A-TRAIL VOLUNTEER DUTIES Welcome to the White Mountain National Forest s Adopt-A-Trail (AAT) program and thank you for volunteering with us! This volunteer

More information

European Youth Orienteering Championships June 1 July Bulletin 2.

European Youth Orienteering Championships June 1 July Bulletin 2. European Youth Orienteering Championships 2018 28 June 1 July 2018 Bulletin 2 Sponsors Partners Become a sponsor or a partner for EYOC 2018 Write to us for more information Organizers 2 Organizers Contacts

More information

Professional Mandoline Manual. Model: 90797

Professional Mandoline Manual. Model: 90797 Professional Mandoline Manual Model: 90797 Introduction Your MIU France Stainless Steel Mandoline features a selection of blades with variable thickness adjustments which make it one of the most versatile

More information

Hillwalking. Hillwalking Adventure Skill

Hillwalking. Hillwalking Adventure Skill Hillwalking Hillwalking Adventure Skill External qualification BOS - the Irish Mountain Training Board in the South and MLTNI in Northern Ireland run a number of Mountain Leadership courses. Those who

More information

Development and performance of the common Keren Stove Yogyakarta, November 2012 March C Pemberton Pigott

Development and performance of the common Keren Stove Yogyakarta, November 2012 March C Pemberton Pigott Development and performance of the common Keren Stove Yogyakarta, November 2012 March 2013 C Pemberton Pigott 1. Overview: 1.1. The Keren stove is the most common single pot cooking device in Central Java.

More information

White Paper: Assessment of 1-to-Many matching in the airport departure process

White Paper: Assessment of 1-to-Many matching in the airport departure process White Paper: Assessment of 1-to-Many matching in the airport departure process November 2015 rockwellcollins.com Background The airline industry is experiencing significant growth. With higher capacity

More information

How to Build Your Own Flour Mill and Sifter

How to Build Your Own Flour Mill and Sifter Prototype and plans developed by Hugo Gervais Custom Fabrication, North Hero, VT Materials List: How to Build Your Own Flour Mill and Sifter Quantity Materials 4 2 X 2 X 26 3 / 16 Square tubing 1 2 X 2

More information

Chapter 7. Geography and the Early Settlement of Egypt, Kush, and Canaan

Chapter 7. Geography and the Early Settlement of Egypt, Kush, and Canaan Chapter 7 Geography and the Early Settlement of Egypt, Kush, and Canaan Chapter 7 Geography and the Early Settlement of Egypt, Kush, and Canaan How did geography affect early in Egypt Kush, and Canaan?

More information

UP Kuna The safest, easiest entry into the world of paragliding

UP Kuna The safest, easiest entry into the world of paragliding UP Kuna The safest, easiest entry into the world of paragliding UP Kuna The safest, easiest entry into the world of paragliding You are a beginner, or an occasional pilot You want safe, easy and satisfying

More information

The Nest Bouldering Guide By Marc Eveleigh Updated March 24 th, 2016

The Nest Bouldering Guide By Marc Eveleigh Updated March 24 th, 2016 The Nest Bouldering Guide By Marc Eveleigh Updated March 24 th, 2016 Introduction The Nest is a small bouldering area set in a neat section of canyon with a rushing stream. Originally called Mophead a

More information

Victoria Falls and Grose Valley to Blackheath Station

Victoria Falls and Grose Valley to Blackheath Station Victoria Falls and Grose Valley to Blackheath Station 3 Days Experienced only 22.5 km One way 5 158m This walk explores a fantastic section of the Grose Valley. Starting above Victoria Falls, the walk

More information

San Luis Obispo. Bishop Peak Felsman Loop Eagle Rock Maino Open Space Poly Canyon Poly P Other Areas

San Luis Obispo. Bishop Peak Felsman Loop Eagle Rock Maino Open Space Poly Canyon Poly P Other Areas San Luis Obispo Bishop Peak Felsman Loop Eagle Rock Maino Open Space Poly Canyon Poly P Other Areas 1 JCT. ELEV. 72 400 00 0 FELSMAN LOOP GATE LOOP RIDGE 600 FENCE JCT. ELEV. 860 1000 1200 BISHOP PEAK

More information

BIOMASS STOVE SAFETY PROTOCOL GUIDELINES

BIOMASS STOVE SAFETY PROTOCOL GUIDELINES BIOMASS STOVE SAFETY PROTOCOL GUIDELINES The process of designing stoves should include evaluation of safety. Seeing that there was no published standardized methodology for evaluating stove safety, Nathan

More information

Helping Your Child Understand Spina Bifida

Helping Your Child Understand Spina Bifida The following information should be seen as a guide. It offers simple answers to questions young child may ask and activities which can be used to help your child better understand and explore new ways

More information

Avalanche Awareness and Leading a Companion Rescue

Avalanche Awareness and Leading a Companion Rescue Avalanche Awareness and Leading a Companion Rescue Introduction: Traveling in the backcountry is a great way to enjoy the outdoors and friends. It s important that when we travel in the backcountry we

More information

Mark Beyer SMOKEJUMPERS. Life Fighting Fires

Mark Beyer SMOKEJUMPERS. Life Fighting Fires Mark Beyer SMOKEJUMPERS Life Fighting Fires Extreme Risk Fighting forest wildfires is a dangerous business. Some wildfires, however, are easier to get to than others. They can begin to burn near roads,

More information

AND LOAD CANOPY RACK SPECIFICATIONS

AND LOAD CANOPY RACK SPECIFICATIONS 8MAY15 INSTRUCTIONS for the LOCK AND LOAD CANOPY RACK SPECIFICATIONS and SAFE LOADING REQUIREMENTS The Lock and Load ladder carrier for Truck Caps is a rack designed to mount to the top of a pickup truck

More information

SLOPE CALCULATION. Wilderness Trekking School 1

SLOPE CALCULATION. Wilderness Trekking School 1 SLOPE CALCULATION By Joe Griffith, February 2014 Objectives Upon completion of this chapter, you will be able to: Read the rise-over-run from a topographic map. Convert the rise-over-run into a slope angle

More information

Recreation Opportunity Spectrum for River Management v

Recreation Opportunity Spectrum for River Management v Recreation Opportunity Spectrum for Management v. 120803 Introduction The following Recreation Opportunity Spectrum (ROS) characterizations and matrices mirror the presentation in the ROS Primer and Field

More information

CLASS D CONTROLLED AIRSPACE GUIDE

CLASS D CONTROLLED AIRSPACE GUIDE CLASS D CONTROLLED AIRSPACE GUIDE Introduction Norwich International Airport is surrounded by Class D Controlled Airspace (CAS). This airspace is made up of a Control Zone (CTR) and a Control Area (CTA).

More information

Notes for Suitcase Oceanography Icebergs and Sea Ice Lesson 1 Where do Icebergs come from?

Notes for Suitcase Oceanography Icebergs and Sea Ice Lesson 1 Where do Icebergs come from? Notes for Suitcase Oceanography Icebergs and Sea Ice Lesson 1 Where do Icebergs come from? 1. In Advance a. One day in advance of you arriving have the teacher give the kids the preevaluation test. b.

More information

Sandbag Barrier. Suitable Applications Sandbag barriers may be suitable: As a linear sediment control measure:

Sandbag Barrier. Suitable Applications Sandbag barriers may be suitable: As a linear sediment control measure: Categories EC Erosion Control SE Sediment Control TC Tracking Control WE Wind Erosion Control Non-Stormwater NS Management Control Waste Management and WM Materials Pollution Control Legend: Primary Category

More information

Practical Risk Management

Practical Risk Management Practical Risk Management During this second hour, we are going to take a look at the practical side of Risk Management, also we are going to talk about ADM and SRM and finally we will participate in risk

More information

Geomorphology. Glacial Flow and Reconstruction

Geomorphology. Glacial Flow and Reconstruction Geomorphology Glacial Flow and Reconstruction We will use simple mathematical models to understand ice dynamics, recreate a profile of the Laurentide ice sheet, and determine the climate change of the

More information

Safe and successful firework displays

Safe and successful firework displays Safe and successful firework displays These tips are intended for those organisers who are mounting firework displays for the general public. There is also important information about your responsibilities

More information

PRAJWAL KHADGI Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering Northern Illinois University DeKalb, Illinois, USA

PRAJWAL KHADGI Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering Northern Illinois University DeKalb, Illinois, USA SIMULATION ANALYSIS OF PASSENGER CHECK IN AND BAGGAGE SCREENING AREA AT CHICAGO-ROCKFORD INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT PRAJWAL KHADGI Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering Northern Illinois University

More information

Fixed Wing (Power) Basic Pilots Course Lesson Plans

Fixed Wing (Power) Basic Pilots Course Lesson Plans Fixed Wing (Power) Basic Pilots Course - Lesson Plans Fixed Wing (Power) Basic Pilots Course Lesson Plans Version: 3.1 Date: 28 Nov 2011 Fixed Wing (Power) Basic Pilots Course - Lesson Plans Contents 1.

More information

Code: T-II-16 Progressive Hose Lay and Packing the Modified Gasner Pack

Code: T-II-16 Progressive Hose Lay and Packing the Modified Gasner Pack Santa Barbara City Fire Department - Standard Operating Procedures Training Operations Code: T-II-16 Progressive Hose Lay and Packing the Modified Gasner Pack Chpt: II Hose Lays Revised: 2/13/13 Pages:

More information

SAFETYSENSE LEAFLET 11 -

SAFETYSENSE LEAFLET 11 - SAFETYSENSE LEAFLET 11 - INTERCEPTION PROCEDURES 1 INTRODUCTION 2 PROCEDURES 3 INTERCEPTING AIRCRAFT SIGNALS AND YOUR RESPONSES 4 SIGNALS INITIATED BY YOUR AIRCRAFT AND RESPONSES BY INTERCEPTING AIRCRAFT

More information

Single and four quadrant versions of the coordinate grid support a differentiated approach.

Single and four quadrant versions of the coordinate grid support a differentiated approach. TEACHERS NOTES About this activity This activity helps pupils practice plotting and using coordinates, using a real life scenario set at Manchester Airport. Taking off can be the noisiest part of a flight

More information

IMPORTANT NOTICE. Professional Mandoline Manual

IMPORTANT NOTICE. Professional Mandoline Manual IMPORTANT NOTICE PLEASE DO NOT RETURN TO STORE. If you have any problems with this unit, contact Consumer Relations for service. PHONE: 206-605-0555 Please read operating instructions before using this

More information

MIT ICAT. Robust Scheduling. Yana Ageeva John-Paul Clarke Massachusetts Institute of Technology International Center for Air Transportation

MIT ICAT. Robust Scheduling. Yana Ageeva John-Paul Clarke Massachusetts Institute of Technology International Center for Air Transportation Robust Scheduling Yana Ageeva John-Paul Clarke Massachusetts Institute of Technology International Center for Air Transportation Philosophy If you like to drive fast, it doesn t make sense getting a Porsche

More information

With God all things are possible. Matthew 19:26, NIV. Walking on Water Matthew 14: Jesus walks on the water and helps His friends.

With God all things are possible. Matthew 19:26, NIV. Walking on Water Matthew 14: Jesus walks on the water and helps His friends. OVERVIEW CARD Key Question: Bottom Line: Memory Verse: Bible Story Focus: Coloring Page: Music: Bible Lesson: Who can do that? Only Jesus can do that! Jesus can do what is impossible. Walking on Water

More information

Jeppesen Total Navigation Solution

Jeppesen Total Navigation Solution Jeppesen Total Navigation Solution Executive summary Do more with less. It s a challenge we all face, and it s the reality of military operations. Jeppesen s Total Navigation Solution (TNS) gives you enterprise,

More information

MAXIMUM LEVELS OF AVIATION TERMINAL SERVICE CHARGES that may be imposed by the Irish Aviation Authority ISSUE PAPER CP3/2010 COMMENTS OF AER LINGUS

MAXIMUM LEVELS OF AVIATION TERMINAL SERVICE CHARGES that may be imposed by the Irish Aviation Authority ISSUE PAPER CP3/2010 COMMENTS OF AER LINGUS MAXIMUM LEVELS OF AVIATION TERMINAL SERVICE CHARGES that may be imposed by the Irish Aviation Authority ISSUE PAPER CP3/2010 COMMENTS OF AER LINGUS 1. Introduction A safe, reliable and efficient terminal

More information

1.2 An Approach Control Unit Shall Provide the following services: c) Alerting Service and assistance to organizations involved in SAR Actions;

1.2 An Approach Control Unit Shall Provide the following services: c) Alerting Service and assistance to organizations involved in SAR Actions; Section 4 Chapter 1 Approach Control Services Approach Control Note: This section should be read in conjunction with Section 2 (General ATS), Section 6 (Separation Methods and Minima) and Section 7 (ATS

More information

International Specification for Sprint Orienteering Maps (ISSOM) Final draft IOF Map Commission 2004 FOREWORD

International Specification for Sprint Orienteering Maps (ISSOM) Final draft IOF Map Commission 2004 FOREWORD International Specification for Sprint Orienteering Maps (ISSOM) Final draft 004 FOREWORD The Map Commission within the International Orienteering Federation is responsible for all matters related to orienteering

More information

Outdoor Developed Areas

Outdoor Developed Areas The United States Access Board is an independent federal agency that promotes equality for people with disabilities through leadership in accessible design and the development of accessibility guidelines

More information

Completing a Constructed Travel Worksheet Voucher

Completing a Constructed Travel Worksheet Voucher 02/16/2018 DEFENSE TRAVEL MANAGEMENT OFFICE Completing a Constructed Travel Worksheet Voucher Overview of Constructed Travel..... Page 1 Traveler Instructions........ Page 3 AO Instructions....... Page

More information

THE WITTE MUSEUM ROCK ART FOUNDATION 24th ANNUAL RENDEZVOUS February 23-25, 2018

THE WITTE MUSEUM ROCK ART FOUNDATION 24th ANNUAL RENDEZVOUS February 23-25, 2018 THE WITTE MUSEUM ROCK ART FOUNDATION 24th ANNUAL RENDEZVOUS February 23-25, 2018 Participation is limited to 130 guests. The format of the Rock Art Rendezvous will focus on site tours of the remarkable

More information

Tri-Glide Instruction Manual

Tri-Glide Instruction Manual Tri-Glide Instruction Manual 12 Timber Lane Marlboro NJ 07746 09/09/2011 tel: 732.462.6277 fax:732.462.6355 email: sales@hilmanrollers.com CONTENTS Contents Page Warnings 3 Operating Instructions 4 General

More information

International Specification for Sprint Orienteering Maps (ISSOM) Final draft. IOF Map Commission 2003 FOREWORD

International Specification for Sprint Orienteering Maps (ISSOM) Final draft. IOF Map Commission 2003 FOREWORD FOREWORD International Specification for Sprint Orienteering Maps (ISSOM) Final draft The Map Commission within the International Orienteering Federation is responsible for all matters related to orienteering

More information

Guide to. Suffolk. Walking. Trails. Lake Meade Park

Guide to. Suffolk. Walking. Trails. Lake Meade Park Walking Lake Meade Park Guide to Suffolk Trails Lake Meade Park Lonestar Lake Regional Park Walking Safety Tips Avoid walking alone on trails. Walking with friends is recommended. Tell someone where you

More information

Consideration will be given to other methods of compliance which may be presented to the Authority.

Consideration will be given to other methods of compliance which may be presented to the Authority. Advisory Circular AC 139-10 Revision 1 Control of Obstacles 27 April 2007 General Civil Aviation Authority advisory circulars (AC) contain information about standards, practices and procedures that the

More information

It s going to be minute clean up minimum. You re going to be running late today for sure.

It s going to be minute clean up minimum. You re going to be running late today for sure. ***IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER*** Please DO NOT copy and paste directly to your site without changing the article considerably to suit your niche site's original angle (Google WILL penalize duplicate content)

More information

Runway Roughness Evaluation- Boeing Bump Methodology

Runway Roughness Evaluation- Boeing Bump Methodology FLIGHT SERVICES Runway Roughness Evaluation- Boeing Bump Methodology Michael Roginski, PE, Principal Engineer Boeing Airport Compatibility Engineering ALACPA X Seminar, Mexico City, Mexico September 3-

More information

Safety Tips for Children Grades K-5

Safety Tips for Children Grades K-5 Safety Tips for Children Grades K-5 Sexual Assault Most grown-ups are nice to kids and care about what happens to them. But every now and then there are grown-ups who try to touch a child in a way that

More information

The Witte Museum Rock Art Foundation White Shaman Preserve Guided Tours

The Witte Museum Rock Art Foundation White Shaman Preserve Guided Tours The Witte Museum Rock Art Foundation White Shaman Preserve Guided Tours Every Saturday, September through May These tours are limited to 20 participants (ages 12 and up) All minors must be accompanied

More information

LEAVE NO TRACE GIANT BOARD GAME: Intro: Help protect the backcountry. You are a visitor there. When you stay at a friend s house, you wouldn t

LEAVE NO TRACE GIANT BOARD GAME: Intro: Help protect the backcountry. You are a visitor there. When you stay at a friend s house, you wouldn t LEAVE NO TRACE GIANT BOARD GAME: Intro: Help protect the backcountry. You are a visitor there. When you stay at a friend s house, you wouldn t trample the flowers, chop down trees, put soap in the drinking

More information

D EVLIN L AW F IRM P.C. P.O. B OX P HOENIX, A RIZONA

D EVLIN L AW F IRM P.C. P.O. B OX P HOENIX, A RIZONA D EVLIN L AW F IRM P.C. P.O. B OX 10477 P HOENIX, A RIZONA 85064-0477 L I S A S O M M E R D E V L I N Solving Room Block Management Issues: Requiring Attendees to Reserve Rooms in the Official Room Block.

More information